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Welcome

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With the current focus on weight loss, consumers may be more receptive to ... Create tips just for me. Are you a serious chocoholic? ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Welcome


1
Welcome …
  • to a New Nutrition
  • Conversation with
  • Consumers …

… about CARBOHYDRATES IN FOOD !
2
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3
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4
What are they saying about carbohydrates?
  • It gives you energy.
  • Turns into sugar in your body.
  • They are temporary fuel for your body, but the
    aftereffects cause you to be really sluggish.
  • They are like a high that makes you feel good
    when you eat them.

SOURCE IFIC Foundation, 2004
5
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Consumers are confused about who and what to
believe when it comes to nutrition …
SOURCE IFIC Foundation, 2004
7
What did they say?
Theres so much talk about carbs now that you
dont know what to eat and what not to eat. Ten
years ago they carbohydrates were good. Now it
has shifted. Eating healthy is definitely a
deprivation.
SOURCE IFIC Foundation, 2004
8
Many people find it difficult to separate valid
recommendations from fad diet advice.
Web Sites
Consumers are bombarded with nutrition
information from a variety of sources.
TV and Radio News
Food Labels
Popular Magazines
Medical Experts
Nutrition information is often seen as
contradictory, even from equally valid sources.
Consumer
Media Images
Fad Diet Gurus
Friends and Family
Food Ads
Govt Guidelines
SOURCE IFIC Foundation, 2004
9
Consumers are especially confused about
carbohydrates … What are they? What foods do
they come from? Do foods with carbohydrates offer
any health benefits? Do I
have to eliminate them all?
SOURCE IFIC Foundation, 2004
10
?
11
Communicating with consumers about the role of
carbohydrates
in a healthy lifestyle
12
  • GOAL
  • Balanced lifestyle based on consumers desire
    for a healthy weight
    and good health

13
  • What consumers say …

14
Who were the participants?
  • Focus groups
  • Females and males concern about their weight
  • BMI 22 to 29 - working to maintain a healthy
    weight
  • Four different viewpoints
  • Nutritionally Savvy Women Conscious about
    nutrition, claim to know a good deal about it,
    and carefully monitor the types/amount of food
    they eat.
  • Common Sense Women Carefully choose certain
    foods for their diets, and use common sense rules
    to govern nutrition choices.
  • Dieters Restricting Foods/Food Groups Men and
    women who dont eat certain foods because of
    dietary restrictions or are following a popular
    diet.
  • Diet OpposedMen and women who are opposed to
    using fad diets that exclude foods or food
    groups.

SOURCE IFIC Foundation, 2004
15
What did they say?
You know that you shouldnt be eating certain
foods. … Ive heard these things before and I
havent changed my lifestyle. We need a more
precise definition of a balanced life.
Now, its hard to apply
this. I would like to know how much sugar I
need everyday.
SOURCE IFIC Foundation, 2004
16
What did they say about sugars and carbs?
  • It gives you energy. (Nutritionally Savvy)
  • Its fuel. (Common Sense)
  • Turns into sugar in your body.
    (Nutritionally Savvy)
  • They make you fat, raise insulin levels, and slow
    down your metabolism.
    (Nutritionally Savvy)
  • They are like a high that makes you feel good
    when you eat them. (Common Sense)

SOURCE IFIC Foundation, 2004
17
Consumers tend to see
carbohydrates, sugars, and sweet foods as tasting
good, BUT needing to be restricted or eliminated.
SOURCE IFIC Foundation, 2004
18
What did they say?
  • Some bad foods just taste good. (Restricting)
  • Fresh fruits are healthy in my mind. I really
    love fruit but I tend to avoid them because they
    are high in carbs. I really miss eating fruit.
    (Restricting)
  • I know what I should eat, but sometimes I choose
    to eat what I want. (Common Sense)
  • If Im in the mood for certain foods, other
    options just arent going to cut it.
    (Nutritionally Savvy)

SOURCE IFIC Foundation, 2004
19
Consumers see a difference between eating for
health and
eating for weight loss.
SOURCE IFIC Foundation, 2004
20
What did they say?
  • I limit carbs primarily for weight.
  • Ideal weight is based on what looks good. Health
    is something different.
  • The carb conscious lifestyle is marketed as
    healthy, but I dont think that it is.
  • There is no such thing as eating for weight loss
    in your 40s, 50s. You have to eat for health.
  • Low carb diets provide immediate results.

SOURCE IFIC Foundation, 2004
21
  • Consumers need help learning HOW to eat for good
    health, weight loss, and taste at the
    same time.

SOURCE IFIC Foundation, 2004
22
HOW consumers view weight management
How active you are
HOW MUCH you eat
WHAT you eat
  • Consumers feel that all three are connected.
  • No one said there is a single approach to
    managing weight. Nearly everyone focuses on a
    combination of all three approaches.
  • While some people place equal emphasis on all
    three, others claim to de-emphasize one in favor
    of a combination of the other two.

SOURCE IFIC Foundation, 2004
23
Consumers identify
various weight management strategies.
Consumers see that many different strategies -
like reading food labels - might help them meet
their goals.
  • Read food labels.
  • Control portions.
  • Use willpower.
  • Make healthier food choices.
  • Avoid extremes achieve better balance.
  • Exercise.
  • Get more sleep.
  • Drink more water.

SOURCE IFIC Foundation, 2004
24
Build on consumer weight
management strategies.
With the current focus on weight loss, consumers
may be more receptive to messages about how much
they eat.
  • Read food labels.
  • Control portions.
  • Use willpower.
  • Make healthier food choices.
  • Avoid extremes achieve better balance.
  • Exercise.
  • Get more sleep.
  • Drink more water.

SOURCE IFIC Foundation, 2004
25
Build on consumer weight
management strategies.
  • Read food labels.
  • Control portions.
  • Use willpower.
  • Make healthier food choices.
  • Avoid extremes achieve better balance.
  • Exercise.
  • Get more sleep.
  • Drink more water.

They want specific ways bring better balance into
their eating habits - and into their their lives.
SOURCE IFIC Foundation, 2004
26
Consumers need how-to information about
CARBOHYDRATES that is …
  • SIMPLE
  • POSITIVE
  • PRACTICAL
  • CONSISTENT

27
2005 Dietary Guidelines
  • Page 3 Make half your grains whole. Eat at least
    3 ounces of whole-grain cereals, breads,
    crackers, rice, or pasta every day.
  • Page 6 Since sugars contribute calories with
    few, if any, nutrients, look for foods and
    beverages low in added sugars.

28
HOW to find carbohydrates on Nutrition Facts
panels
Total Carbohydrate (grams and ) Dietary Fiber
(grams and ) Sugars (grams)
29
Use tested, do-able messages ...
  • You can include
  • sweet foods
  • in moderation
  • as part of a healthy
  • eating plan.

SOURCE IFIC Foundation, 2001
30
Use tested, do-able messages ...
  • Dont go to extremes! Build a
    balanced diet from a mix of carbohydrates, fat
    and protein.

SOURCE IFIC Foundation, 2004
31
TIPS … the missing ingredients!!
Tell us HOW to do it!!
Dont just tell us what to do.
32
Craft how-to tips with consumer appeal ...
  • Be positive.
  • Keep tips short and simple.
  • Create tips just for me.
  • Make tips specific and manageable.
  • Provide the payoff.
  • Talk food and fun.

33
Be positive.
  • Set an example for your children. Order
    milk, water, or an occasional small or medium
    soft drink instead of extra large, and skip the
    refills. Consider a diet or low-calorie version
    of the soft drink.

34
Be positive.
  • Order once, enjoy twice. Eat half your pasta
    dinner at the restaurant, take the rest home for
    lunch tomorrow.

35
Keep tips short and simple.
  • Have a single dip ice
    cream cone instead of
    a double.

36
Keep tips short and simple.
  • Use smaller plates and bowls - your naturally
    smaller portions will seem bigger.

37
Create tips just for me.
  • Lots of high-powered breakfast meetings? Balance
    your morning by choosing a carbohydrate (bread or
    cereal), a protein (eggs or yogurt), and fruit at
    each meal.

38
Create tips just for me.
  • Are you a serious chocoholic? No need to give up
    your after-dinner dessert - just ask for two
    forks and share with a friend.

39
Make tips specific and manageable.
  • Not a fan of plain fiber cereals? Create your own
    breakfast brand by mixing 2 or 3 different
    cereals. Choose at least one that says high in
    fiber on the box.

40
Make tips specific and manageable.
  • Create your own high-energy snack
    mix 1/4 cup nuts 1/4 cup dried fruit a
    handful of your favorite snack crackers.

41
Provide the payoff.
  • Need more iron for energy, strong muscles, and
    brain power? Pump up your iron levels with
    fortified breads and cereals.

42
Provide the payoff.
  • Eat a lighter breakfast and lunch to plan for
    pizza with the works at dinner. Youll enjoy
    your pizza - and a guilt-free evening too.

43
Talk food and fun.
  • Get untangled from your usual spaghetti and
    experiment with 350 varieties of pasta. Choose
    from A to Z - with fun shapes, like fusilli,
    mezzani, rotini, and tufoli.

44
Talk food and fun.
  • Want a cookie? Eat a cookie! Just dont eat 10
    cookies.

45
Tips are not one-size-fits-all ...
  • PERSONALIZE
  • whenever possible.

46
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47
For more information, contact International
Food Information Council (IFIC) Foundation 1100
Connecticut Avenue, NW Suite 430 Washington, DC
20036 Phone 202-296-6540 Online
www.ific.org
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