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The MultiSite Church Planting Strategy: One church operating in multiple locations

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Excerpted from the Encyclopedia of Church Planting by T Cheyney ... Excerpted from the Encyclopedia of Church Planting by T Cheyney. What does it look like today? ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: The MultiSite Church Planting Strategy: One church operating in multiple locations


1
The Multi-Site Church Planting StrategyOne
church operating in multiple locations!
  • By
  • Tom Cheyney

2
Original Material
  • The original material for this resource grew out
    of my personal experience with Elmer Towns
    (1984), when he challenged a group of us to
    consider Multi-site and Expanded Geographic
    Strategy for our present church plants.
    Additionally, it grew out of chapters 16 and 17
    of a church planting manual I authored in 1989.
    It has been updated with current on-field
    multi-site church planting. In the past, about
    12 churches were trying these planting
    strategies. Today, there are over 1,200
    multi-site churches, and the number is increasing!

3
The Challenge
  • Many new church plants, and existing churches,
    are faced with the challenge of having located in
    a community where there is little growth.
    Usually, for new churches, it is due to
    inadequately understanding the shifts taking
    place in the target area.

4
The Challenge
  • For long established churches, they are faced
    with the challenge of having located in a
    community where there is little growth compared
    to 20 years ago! When this happens, these
    churches look toward new, developing areas
    outside their community.

5
The Potential
  • Perhaps, they ought to relocate.
  • Perhaps, they ought to plant another church!
  • What is the answer?
  • How about doing both -- in a better way?

6
What to doWhat to do?
  • Many new and established churches have seen many
    of their members move into new areas across town
    or out on the fringe of town.
  • Faced with such situations, many new and
    established churches begin the laborious work of
    relocation.

7
What to doWhat to do?
  • How about starting another new church by
    developing multiple sites?
  • Lets consider this idea Stay here and move
    there!

8
Point to ponder!
  • Our strong churches are growing large by growing
    smaller simultaneously.
  • They blend the strength that size offers, with
    the convenience of smaller and closer venues.
  • Multi-site plants enable the new work to have
    punch, while keeping the excitement of something
    new!

9
THE EXPANDED GEOGRAPHIC STRATEGY
  • The eighth innovative strategy, which we will
    discuss briefly, is one that was just beginning
    to be used in the United States in the early
    1980s.
  • It is the Expanded Geographic Strategy. This
    strategy is when a new or existing church
    begins to expand its ministry by developing
    satellite locations.
  • The first pastor to develop this concept was Fred
    Smith out of Texas. He started these satellites
    as additional preaching opportunities on Sundays.

10
THE EXPANDED GEOGRAPHIC STRATEGY
  • Once they grew to sufficient size, he called a
    church planter on staff to lead it further. As he
    added the extra staff, the church quit being an
    expanded geographic church, and became its own
    automous work.
  • An Expanded Geographic Strategy has at least two
    locations. The church ministers in both places
    every Sunday.

11
THE EXPANDED GEOGRAPHIC STRATEGY
  • AN EXAMPLE FROM THE PAST (Circa 1980S)
  • In the San Fernando Valley of California, there
    is an early example of this type of strategy. It
    is the Church on the Way (Jack Hayford, pastor).
  • Some church structures would say this concept is
    where one complete staff pastors two different
    congregations.

12
THE EXPANDED GEOGRAPHIC STRATEGY
  • Originally, this church was called The Van
    Nuys Foursquare Church, but was later changed. It
    identifies itself with Jesus, who called Himself
    "the Way," and with Christians, who are willing
    to be "on the way with Jesus" to touch needy
    people.

13
THE EXPANDED GEOGRAPHIC STRATEGY
  • The Church on the Way, like many of the other
    churches that are innovative, design their
    services for the nonbeliever, as well as the
    believer.
  • This church has experienced growth without some
    of the traditional methods, such as revivals or
    evangelistic preaching, altar calls, and
    visitation programs.
  • At The Church on the Way, the preaching does not
    center on denouncing sin, but on exalting Christ.
    One very important aspect of Expanded Geographic
    churches is that it focuses on new worship
    dynamics and experiences.

14
THE EXPANDED GEOGRAPHIC STRATEGY
  • Hayford says the church must "redefine,
    unwrap and unseal" worship. To him, this means
    that worship must be more than the adoration of
    God it also includes intimacy between the
    worshiper and God.1 The unwrapping means
    removing sectarian prejudices. Unsealing worship
    means that worship becomes a whole-person
    reformation process.
  • 1Jack Hayford, The Billy Graham School
    of Evangelism, Wheaton, 1991, July 14-18.

15
THE EXPANDED GEOGRAPHIC STRATEGY
  • For a further understanding, his book,
    Worship His Majesty, is an excellent source of
    this worship strategy.
  • Another excellent resource is Sally
    Morgenthalers book, Worship Evangelism Inviting
    Unbelievers into the Presence of God.

16
THE EXPANDED GEOGRAPHIC STRATEGY
  • CONCLUDING THOUGHTS ON THE EXPANDED
    GEOGRAPHIC STRATEGY
  • The only way a strong, expanded, geographic
    church can continue is for the professional staff
    to be completely committed to the strategy.
    Having a two campus church can be exciting, but
    it also could lead to growth pains along the way.

17
THE EXPANDED GEOGRAPHIC STRATEGY
  • In order to facilitate an expanded location
    ministry, The Church on the Way used two
    facilities, about one quarter of a mile apart.
    The congregations use both auditoriums and Sunday
    School space, but they alternate locations each
    hour in order to solve the problem of parking
    between services.
  • The Expanded Geographic Strategy is an idea we
    will hear more about as we face the turn of the
    century.

18
THE EXPANDED GEOGRAPHIC STRATEGY
  • Well, we are here in the 21st Century and the
    strategy that started with a few churches has
    blossomed!
  • (More on that later.)

19
What does it look like today?
  • Conjoined congregations One church meeting
    simultaneously in two or more locations. They
    usually share the preacher by one site live and
    the other video linked.
  • Example Larry Osborne,
  • North Coast Church, Ca.
    Jack Hayford,
  • The Church on the Way,
    Ca.
  • 2. Video Cafes Multiple congregations of one
    church, meeting at different times on the main
    campus, often with different worship formats,
    watch the same preacher on recorded video or live
    link.

20
What does it look like today?
  • Satellite Congregations Multiple congregations,
    still controlled by the mother church but
    operating on remote campuses, watch recorded
    sermons of the preacher at the main campus.
  • Examples Andy Stanley, Bill Hybels and Dave
    Ferguson

21
What does it look like today?
  • The Preacher-less Church An independent
    congregation that uses recorded sermons from
    another ministry, while providing its own
    worship, leadership, programming, and governing
    body. Example Charles Stanley and
  • Bill Hybels

22
Same Idea Different Location
23
THE EXTENDED GEOGRAPHIC STRATEGY
  • The ninth strategy, and the second along the
    line of geographic-oriented strategies, is the
    Extended Geographic Strategy. Like the previous
    strategy, there was not a lot of written work on
    the concept in the early 1980s. As we moved into
    the 21st Century, that all changed. In 1990,
    Elmer L. Towns, Vice President of Liberty
    University and Dean of their School of Religion,
    coined the term "Extended Geographical Parish
    Church."ii For the next three years, there
    would only be one example.
  • iiTowns, p. 90.

24
THE EXTENDED GEOGRAPHIC STRATEGY
  • AN EXAMPLE FROM THE PAST (Circa 1980S)
  • It worked and it didnt! Others tried it and
    they were successful.
  • Again, Elmer Towns states, "Inasmuch as a church
    is the extension of the length and shadow of its
    pastor, so is the unusual extended geographical
    strategy of Perimeter Church to reach the entire
    metropolitan population of Atlanta."iii
  • iii Towns, p. 90.

25
THE EXTENDED GEOGRAPHIC STRATEGY
  • Their pastor, Randy Pope, originally had a
    vision of planting 100 church fronts around the
    interstate perimeter of Atlanta, Georgia. That is
    how it actually got its name. Popes vision was
    to touch the entire metro area of Atlanta for
    Christ. Pastor Pope states, "I didn't want to
    build just one super church touching only one
    socioeconomic group in one part of Atlanta," he
    says. "Instead, I wanted to find a way to impact
    the whole of the city- reaching far beyond the
    influence of one church in one location."

26
THE EXTENDED GEOGRAPHIC STRATEGY
  • Hence Perimeter Church would be designed to be
    one "local church," but one that meets in many
    locations."iv It still uses the same idea of
    one senior pastor like the Expanded Geographic
    Strategy of The Church on the Way, but that is
    where the similarities change.
  • ivTowns, p. 90.

27
THE EXTENDED GEOGRAPHIC STRATEGY
  • Yes, there is one pastor leader, but each of the
    perimeter locations has individual pastors and
    separate outreach programs. There is one board
    that runs these churches with three elders from
    each congregation serving on the board.

28
THE EXTENDED GEOGRAPHIC STRATEGY
  • The Extended Geographic Strategy uses the
    principle of referral. Friends tell friends about
    the church and help them find the Perimeter
    church closest to them. One very unique part of
    the Perimeter Church of Atlanta is their DAWN
    (Discipleship and Weekly Nurture) group for men.
    The first church (location) was begun September
    25, 1977.v
  • v Towns, p. 90.

29
THE EXTENDED GEOGRAPHIC STRATEGY
  • In less than three years, Randy Pope had the
    church ready to launch its second location (on
    the other side of the Atlanta perimeter loop in
    Marietta, Georgia).
  • In 1980, Perimeter Church of Atlanta began its
    second ministry center, which was a little over
    10 miles from the original congregation. Since
    that time, a new congregation has been planted
    about every three years.
  • The third plant was located about 20 miles from
    the original in Gwinnett County. Today, they have
    multiple locations around the perimeter area.

30
CONCLUDING THOUGHTS ON THE EXTENDED GEOGRAPHIC
STRATEGY
  • It is easy to realize that such a strategy takes
    a group of individuals who believe in missions.
    The model is a servant to the mission of reaching
    lost souls for Jesus Christ.
  • Once again, this strategy is geared toward
    reaching the un-churched in America today.

31
CONCLUDING THOUGHTS ON THE EXTENDED GEOGRAPHIC
STRATEGY
  • As Perimeter Church moved into the 1990's, it
    took a bold step, constituting each of the five
    churches with each one remaining committed to
    starting perimeter churches around Atlanta.
  • Each give 5 percent of its budget to a new
    congregation through Perimeter Ministries
    Incorporated.
  • Still, its main purpose is to plant new
    congregations around the perimeter of Atlanta.

32
CONCLUDING THOUGHTS ON THE EXTENDED GEOGRAPHIC
STRATEGY
  • Remember I said, It worked and it didnt!
    Others tried it and they were successful?
  • Though the Perimeter experiment worked, today
    the mother church exists as the strongest of the
    five with some of the others having become
    automous.

33
CONCLUDING THOUGHTS ON THE EXTENDED GEOGRAPHIC
STRATEGY
  • Yet, others followed this strategy in the late
    1990s and found tremendous success!
  • Some call this strategy a church planting
    strategy, while others call it a church
    expansion strategy.
  • Regardless, God has been honored and strong new
    churches have been started.
  • It did work! It still does.

34
Seven Reasons to Start a Satellite or Multi-site
Option
  • To break the stalemate between remaining at the
    old site and relocation.
  • a) Those who oppose abandoning a sacred site do
    not have to yield.
  • b) Those who want new facilities on a larger
    site at a more strategic location, can also have
    their way.
  • c) Both groups are winners there are no
    losers.

35
Seven Reasons to Start a Satellite or Multisite
Option
  • 2.To offer the possibility of reaching and
    serving a larger and more diverse group of people
    than could be achieved by concentrating all
    resources at only one place.
  • 3.To have a larger membership that can provide
    the financial resources needed to purchase land
    and construct new buildings.

36
Seven Reasons to Start a Satellite or Multisite
Option
  • 4.To retain the advantage of a large and
    competent staff, a large cadre of volunteer
    leaders, and the institutional strength of a big
    church for implementing ministry.
  • 5.To offer a broader range of choices than either
    could if the decision had been made to divide.
  • 6.To expand physical facilities.
  • 7.To create a vacuum that challenges more people
    to serve in leadership roles.

37
Some Guidelines to Utilizing the Multi-site
Option
  • Have only one governing board, one set of
    administrative committees, one budget, one
    treasury, one staff, one senior minister, and one
    definition of purpose and role.
  • If two sites, this usually means the senior
    minister will preach at both places on at least
    35 Sunday mornings every year.

38
Some Guidelines to Utilizing the Multi-site
Option
  • Neither site should be perceived as
    second-class.
  • Determine the number of sites that the
    congregation and staff can handle.

39
Seven Variations of the Multisite Option
  • 1.The Downtown Church - satellite is only a
    preaching point, not a seven-day-a-week ministry
    center.
  • 2.The Urban Church - has two, three or four
    off-campus meeting places.
  • 3.The use of a satellite as one step in an
    extended relocation process.

40
Seven Variations of the Multisite Option
  • 4.The predominantly black, central-city
    congregation and the predominantly Anglo,
    suburban congregation.
  • 5. As a product of the Key Church Strategy.
  • 6. As an expression of the large congregation
    caring for wounded birds.
  • 7. As a practical strategy for mothering a new
    mission.

41
Examples of Multisite Option Churches
  • 1. Perimeter Example - Atlanta, GA
  • Design one congregation, one senior minister,
    one budget, one treasury, and several meeting
    places.
  • Began in 1977 when Randy Pope was called by the
    Presbyterian Church in America to plant a new
    mission on the north side of Atlanta.
  • By 1993, the church had six locations with plans
    being finalized to plant a seventh in Buckhead
    and an eighth in Atlanta.

42
Examples of Multisite Option Churches
  • 1. Perimeter Example - Atlanta, GA
  • _ Created a corporation in 1990 called
    Perimeter Ministries International (PMI). It is
    an outreach mission of these churches. It has
    three objectives
  • A. To plant and nurture healthy churches reaching
    a variety of socioeconomic and ethnic groups,
    both here and abroad.

43
Examples of Multisite Option Churches
  • 1. Perimeter Example - Atlanta, GA
  • B. To unite the resources of each member church
    to make an impact on culture by ministering to
    the under-resourced people of Atlanta, targeting
    groups that shape the social, economic, political
    structures of our society.
  • C. To resource existing churches with materials,
    ideas and training for effective ministry.

44
Examples of Multisite Option Churches
  • 2.An Ohio Example - Columbus, OH
  • By mid 1980's, First Community Church had many
    assets, but needed to relocate.
  • Decision to relocate was voted down three times.
  • In 1990, presented new plan renovate the old
    site and start new site.

45
Examples of Multisite Option Churches
  • 2.An Ohio Example - Columbus, OH
  • Lessons learned by Ohio
  • Count the support of those willing to invest
    their time, energy, creativity, and money on a
    new tomorrow.
  • Proposals for radical change often must be
    presented several times before they are
    implemented.

46
Examples of Multisite Option Churches
  • 2.An Ohio Example - Columbus, OH
  • Lessons learned by Ohio
  • Love for the old, sacred place, the hope to
    perpetuate the past, and the preference for
    modest changes can be powerful, motivating
    forces!
  • Having multiple sites can create a win-win
    situation.
  • Only in the existence of a widely perceived
    crisis, is it easy to move fast.

47
Examples of Multisite Option Churches
  • 2.An Ohio Example - Columbus, OH
  • Lessons learned by Ohio
  • Nostalgia, the past, feelings, and emotion often
    are more influential motivators than logic,
    reason and a concern for the future.
  • To reach new generations, invite them to help
    pioneer new ministries at a new site in a new
    building that is not filled with traditions and
    precedents.

48
Examples of Multisite Option Churches
  • 2.An Ohio Example - Columbus, OH
  • Lessons learned by Ohio
  • The importance of program staff rotating through
    both facilities.
  • -- People learned to replace the
    word competition in their thinking about
    ministry with the word complement.

49
Examples of Multisite Option Churches
  • 3. A Texas Example - Houston, TX
  • By early 1990's, First United Methodist Church
    had 14,000 members and a 27.4 acre site.
  • In 1993, decided to start a separate site
    including
  • 900 service lead by senior minister with a
    traditional setting.
  • 1100 service lead by associate minister with a
    more contemporary setting that included drama,
    testimonies, contemporary music, and an informal
    setting.

50
Examples of Multisite Option Churches
  • 3. A Texas Example - Houston, TX
  • Their ministry was motivated by
  • Strength not weakness. (One of the largest
    downtown Protestant congregations on the North
    American continent.)
  • Not by overcrowding, but by a desire to reach and
    serve people who would not come downtown to
    church.
  • A compelling vision of a new model of ministry
    for a downtown church in a huge metropolitan area.

51
Examples of Multisite Option Churches
  • 4. Two more facets of multi-site option
  • The stronger and more venturesome the
    congregation who initiates the design, the more
    likely it will arouse apposition from other
    ministers and denominational officials.
  • The greater the resources available to the
    initiating church, the less likely it will be a
    significant diversion from the traditional
    ministry of that initiating congregation.

52
Multi-site ideas
  • What makes the multi-site unique? It is that it
    can use the existing churchs mentors and
    encouragers to support, encourage and organize
    volunteers of the new site.
  • They can care for and train so new volunteers are
    more willing to serve.

53
Multi-site ideas
  • While the average member will drive longer
    distances to participate in celebration services
    of a large church, if they live more than 20
    minutes away, they usually will be unwilling to
    serve and bring friends. The distance diminishes
    active participation.

54
Multi-site ideas
  • The multi-site church reaches out to produce more
    Christians and more mature Christians.
  • The multi-site church has the strength of what
    used to be reserved for denominational churches,
    i.e., loyalty.
  • Today, this same loyalty is found in the trusted
    brand of the same church in multiple locations
    (brand loyalty).
  • Your new location becomes a trusted brand, while
    offering something new!

55
Multi-site ideas
  • The multi-site church begins with a fuller staff,
    as compared to most new launches. Planters are
    generalists, whereas multi-site launches offer
    specialists.
  • Multi-site plants cost less, and staffing
    correctly enables both churches to reach more
    people for Christ!
  • Both churches will be better organized than a new
    plant.

56
Multi-site ideas
  • The multi-site church offers excellence from the
    larger church, as well as celebrative
    expectation.
  • Excellence will then flow both ways! Innovation
    from one will inspire the other.
  • The technology is in place to deliver consistent
    teaching every week via video. Now the issue is,
    will our theology allow us to try something new?

57
Some Updated Modern Examples
  • Dave Ferguson, Community Christian Church
    Naperville, Romeoville, and Montgomery, Illinois.
    Total weekend attendance 3,000
  • Bill Hybels, Willow Creek Community Church South
    Barrington, McHenry, Wheaton and Rockford,
    Illinois. Total weekend attendance in
    off- campus sites 3,500!

58
Some Updated Modern Examples
  • Andy Stanley, NorthPoint Community Church
    Alpharetta, Buckhead and Cumming, Georgia.
    Total weekend attendance 20,000
  • Irwin McManus, Mosaic Church Los Angeles, two
    high schools and one nightclub 1,500

59
Still Other Examples
  • Life Church, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.
  • St. Pauls Lutheran, Aurora, Illinois.
  • Fellowship Bible Church, Little Rock Arkansas.
  • North Coast Community, Vista, California.
  • Life Journey Christian Church, Bakersfield,
    California.
  • Eastside Baptist Church, Marietta, Georgia.
  • New Hope Church, Peachtree City, Georgia.

60
Ian Butain
  • The following is originally from Dr. Ian Butain,
    Nehemiah Professor of Church Planting, North
    American Mission Board, SBC

61
Church PlantingMethodologies
  • The Satellite Model

62
The Satellite Model
Occurs when the mother ship sends out a probe
  • Occurs when the mother ship sends out a probe

63
The Satellite Model
  • When the head office opens up a new branch.

64
The Satellite Model
  • Occurs when a mother church duplicates itself
    in another location.

65
Characteristics of the Satellite Model
  • Worship service is in a different location.
  • Will sometimes reinvent itself at the new
    location.
  • Will often attract pioneering leaders from the
    main campus.

66
Characteristics of the Satellite Model
  • Often requires a senior pastor with tenure.
  • Uses the same leadership, administration and
    budget.
  • Requires excellent communication mechanisms.

67
Criticisms of the Satellite Model
  • Mother church, board, and pastor have control
    issues.
  • Its not really church planting.
  • Its just building somebodys personal kingdom.
  • It is dividing the church.

68
Strengths of the Satellite Model
  • Satellite churches will meet the needs of
    different people.
  • Satellite churches can try new things without
    affecting members at the main campus.
  • Satellite churches allow the mother to change at
    her own pace.
  • The new church is able to borrow credibility from
    the mother.

69
Strengths of the Satellite Model
  • Satellite churches allow an older, ingrown church
    to fulfill the Great Commission.
  • Satellite churches allow a church that is
    cramped for space, to continue to grow.
  • Satellites can duplicate what works.
  • Satellite churches may result in new churches.

70
Potential Weaknesses of this Model
  • Satellite churches may result in the loss of key
    leaders, threatening the tenure of the lead
    pastor.
  • Satellite churches may become a threat to the
    mother church.
  • Satellite leadership may not be well represented
    in the decision-making process of the church.

71
Potential Weaknesses of this model
  • It is often difficult to maintain unity in the
    church.
  • There is often a tendency to grow apart over
    time.
  • Separation can be painful and messy.

72
Places to find other resources on Multi-site/
Satellite
  • www.ChurchPlantingVillage.net
  • www.leadnet.org/resources
  • Leadership Journal Spring 2003
  • davel_at_communitychristianchurch.org
  • www.newchurches.com

73
Critical Question
  • Are you up to the challenge? Are you willing to
    branch out and try the multi-site church planting
    strategy?
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