DES Family Advocacy Program and Sexual Assault Response Program - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – DES Family Advocacy Program and Sexual Assault Response Program PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: 34571-NGFjM



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

DES Family Advocacy Program and Sexual Assault Response Program

Description:

Domestic violence risk factors and indicators. What the Family Advocacy Program ... In 1984, DoD created the FAP to address child abuse and domestic violence. ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:297
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 47
Provided by: first95
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: DES Family Advocacy Program and Sexual Assault Response Program


1
DES Family Advocacy Program andSexual
Assault Response Program
  • Mary Asmonga-Knapp, LMSW, ACSW
  • Family Advocacy Program Manager
  • Sexual Assault Response Coordinator

2
Training Overview
  • Child abuse risk factors and indicators
  • Domestic violence risk factors and indicators
  • What the Family Advocacy Program (FAP) does
  • Sexual Assault Prevention and Response
  • What you can do to help yourself and your family

3
Child Abuse
  • Physical injury
  • Sexual maltreatment
  • Emotional maltreatment
  • Deprivation of necessities (neglect)

4
Child Abuse Risk Factors
  • Stress is a major risk factor for physical abuse.
    Stressful events include
  • Marital problems
  • Serious or extended illness
  • Unplanned or unwanted pregnancy
  • Deployment/extended temporary duty
  • PCS moves
  • Parents family of origin issues

5
Domestic Abuse
  • Maltreatment that is directed toward a person of
    the opposite sex who is
  • A current or former spouse
  • A person with whom the abuser shares a child in
    common
  • A current or former intimate partner with whom
    the abuser shares or has shared a common domicile

6
Domestic Abuse
  • Domestic violence
  • Emotional/psychological abuse
  • Economic control
  • Interference with personal liberty

7
Indicators of Potential for AbuseNational
Coalition Against Domestic Violence
  • Grow up in a violent family?
  • Use force to solve problems?
  • Jealous of partners other relationships?
  • Frequently put down others?
  • When angry, do others fear him/her?

8
Why Batter?
  • Desire for power and control
  • Most likely to have been abused as a child
  • Alcohol/substance abuse
  • Insecure
  • Poor impulse control
  • Extreme jealousy inability to trust
  • Perspective that places men in a dominant role

9
Characteristics of Victims
  • No specific trait identifies a victim of domestic
    abuse. It could happen to anyone.

10
Cycle of Domestic Violence
11
Phases of the Cycle of Violence
  • Tension Building
  • Something is triggering the violence
  • Stuffs feelings justifies spouse being late
    put downs
  • The Explosion
  • Unable to diffuse the tension and RAGE
  • Slams door throws magazines scratches
  • Wrestles to the ground holds hair
  • The Honeymoon
  • Denial of the problem and seeking some sense of
    forgiveness
  • Forgive and forget exchanges loving words
  • Blames the victim for the violence

12
What is FAP?
  • In 1984, DoD created the FAP to address child
    abuse and domestic violence.
  • The FAP mission is to prevent, identify, report,
    intervene in and treat all aspects of child abuse
    and neglect and domestic abuse.

13
The Goals of FAP
  • Promote the prevention, identification, reporting
    and treatment of abuse
  • Strengthen family functioning of military
    families

14
Goals of FAP (cont.)
  • Preserve families in which abuse has occurred
    without compromising safety
  • Collaborate with civilian agencies
  • Provide treatment when appropriate

15
How FAP Works
  • IDENTIFICATION
  • DoD policy requires everyone to report all
    suspected cases of child abuse and domestic
    violence to FAP
  • Victims of domestic violence now have a
    restricted reporting option

16
How FAP Works
  • ASSESSMENT
  • Separate clinical assessments
  • Police and medical reports
  • Child protective services reports
  • Case Review Committee (multi-disciplinary)

17
How FAP Works
  • SUPPORT FOR VICTIMS
  • Safety planning
  • Crisis Intervention
  • Shelter or foster care
  • Victim advocacy counseling
  • Support groups

18
How FAP Works
  • TREATMENT FOR ABUSERS
  • Goal is to help them recognize their behavior is
    unacceptable and to stop it.
  • For domestic violence Stop using power and
    control and violence
  • For child abuse Teaching safer ways to
    discipline and care for children

19
Misconceptions
  • MYTH Family violence is a personal matter of
    concern only to the family
  • FACT Family violence is an issue for the
    entire military community and requires command
    involvement

20
Misconceptions
  • MYTH Military rates of domestic violence are
    higher than civilian rates
  • FACT Comparisons are difficult. When civilian
    studies factor for age, income, and educational
    level, the rates are almost equal.

21
Misconceptions
  • MYTH Females in the military are as violent as
    males
  • FACT Females also commit domestic violence, but
    not at the same rates or level of severity

22
Misconceptions
  • MYTH Service members who perform well on the
    job are unlikely to engage in family violence
  • FACT Violent behavior is not restricted to poor
    performers. Some stellar performers at work may
    expect the same perfect performance from their
    family members.

23
Misconceptions
  • MYTH Domestic violence does not affect the
    children
  • FACT Two-thirds of the children in homes where
    there is violence between the parents are
    physically or sexually abused.

24
Misconceptions
  • MYTH Men are unlikely victims of violence
  • FACT In 30 of the domestic abuse incidents
    reported to FAP, women are the alleged abuser

25
Questions
  • What questions do you have about child abuse,
    domestic violence, or how FAP works?

26
DoD Sexual Assault Prevention and Response
  • Learning Objectives
  • Understand DoD mission and philosophy on sexual
    assault prevention and response
  • Define sexual assault and its distinction from
    other forms of behavior
  • Know reporting options and how to report it

27
DoD Sexual Assault Policy
  • Provides a clear definition of sexual assault
  • Establishes immediate response capability to
    ensure access to victim services
  • Designates responsibilities of Sexual Assault
    Response Coordinator (SARC) and Victim Advocates

28
DoD Sexual Assault Policy
  • Focuses on education, prevention, integrated
    victim support, appropriate action, and timely
    reporting
  • Establishes a program structure to provide
    support to sexual assault victims through
    Installation Victim Advocates or Unit Victim
    Advocates and SARC

29
Sexual Assault Policy Key Points
  • Sexual assault is a criminal offense
  • DoD will use training, education, and awareness
    to prevent sexual assault
  • All victims should be treated with dignity,
    respect, and sensitivity
  • Unrestricted reports require aggressive, timely,
    and thorough investigations
  • Those who commit sexual assault offenses should
    be held accountable

30
Sexual Assault Defined
  • Intentional sexual contact, characterized by use
    of force, physical threat, or abuse of authority
    or when the victim does not or cannot consent
  • Includes rape, nonconsensual sodomy (oral or
    anal), indecent assault (unwanted inappropriate
    sexual contact or fondling) or attempts to commit
    these acts

31
Sexual Harassment Defined
  • A form of gender discrimination that involves
    unwelcome sexual advances, requests for special
    favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a
    sexual nature when
  • A persons job, pay, or career is placed at risk
  • An employees employment or career is placed in
    jeopardy
  • It creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive
    work environment

32
Victims Reporting Options
  • Learning Objectives
  • Explain the rationale for providing victims with
    reporting options
  • Describe the difference between RESTRICTED and
    UNRESTRICTED reporting and the benefits and
    limitations of each
  • Explain the exceptions to restricted reporting
    and the applicability of exceptions

33
Previous Reporting Policy
  • No confidentiality
  • Chaplains privilege all others had to report
    sexual assault
  • Medical treatment initiated an investigation
  • Law enforcement notified immediately
  • Victim had no control over release or management
    of his/her personal information

34
Unrestricted Reporting
  • DoD policy favors unrestricted reporting
  • Command and investigative services are notified
    enables offender accountability
  • Allows the victim to receive
  • Medical treatment
  • Sexual Assault Forensic Examination
    (SAFE)
  • Advocacy services
  • Counseling services
  • Legal services

35
Benefits of Unrestricted Reporting
  • Ensures the widest range of rights and
    protections to the victim
  • Commander support (Military Protective Orders,
    separation from offender, deferred collateral
    misconduct, etc.)
  • Full investigation enhances opportunity to hold
    offender accountable (crime scene, witness
    interviews, suspect interrogation)
  • May encourage other victims to come forward
  • Enhanced community safety

36
Limitations of Unrestricted Reporting
  • Cannot change to Restricted Reporting
  • Victim may consider it too intrusive
  • Others will find out
  • Investigations and court proceedings may be
    lengthy
  • May not be enough evidence to convict the offender

37
Restricted Reporting
  • Allows a Service member who is sexually assaulted
    to disclose the incident to specifically
    identified personnel
  • SARC
  • Victim Advocate(s)
  • Healthcare providers
  • Chaplains

38
Restricted Reporting
  • Allows the victim to receive
  • Medical treatment
  • Advocacy services
  • Counseling assistance
  • Victim decides whether and when to move forward
    with initiating an investigation
  • DOES NOT TRIGGER THE INVESTIGATIVE PROCESS

39
Limitations of Restricted Reporting
  • Victims assailant remains unpunished and at
    large
  • Victim cannot receive a Military Protection Order
    (MPO)/No Contact Order
  • Victim may continue to have contact with the
    assailant
  • Evidence from the crime scene may be lost
  • Victim unable to discuss the assault with other
    Service members

40
Purpose of Victims Reporting Options
  • Ensure victims receive medical, counseling, and
    advocacy services
  • Remove barriers
  • Perceived lack of privacy/confidentiality
  • Embarrassment/stigma
  • Fear of reprisal from offender
  • Lack of confidence in chain of command
  • Fear of repercussions regarding
    collateral misconduct
  • Concern about how report will affect
    their career, unit, and the mission

41
Restricted Reporting
  • The Installation Commander is notified by the
    SARC within 24 hours of the assault and is
    provided with non-identifying personal
    information only.

42
Exceptions to Confidentiality/Restricted Reporting
  • A victim consents in writing
  • Disclosure is necessary to prevent or lessen a
    serious and imminent threat to the victim or
    another individual
  • Disclosure is necessary to determine fitness for
    duty or disability determination
  • When ordered by a judge or required by federal or
    state statute
  • Exceptions do not equal full disclosure

43
Independent Investigations
  • Investigations of restricted cases may occur if
  • Command receives information from a source
    independent of the restricted reporting avenues
  • Victim discloses circumstances of the sexual
    assault to someone other than the VA, SARC,
    Chaplain, or healthcare provider

44
Local Resources
  • SARC at H.D.I. Federal Center is
  • Mary Asmonga-Knapp, LMSW, ACSW
  • Family Advocacy Program, at 269-961-4051
  • Victim Advocates at the H.D.I Federal Center are
  • Jan Shaw, RN, X7038
  • Cassandra Howard X 5936
  • Sexual Assault Services in Battle Creek
  • 269-660-3925
  • Michigan Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault
    Hotline
  • 1-800-353-8227

45
Questions?
  • What questions do you have about Sexual Assault
    Prevention and Response?

46
The End
  • Thank you for your attention, and thank you for
    your service to our country!
  • Mary Asmonga-Knapp, LMSW, ACSW
  • 2-1-54
  • 269-961-4051
  • DSN 932-4051
About PowerShow.com