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School Health Planning

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Fitness testing should not begin before Grade 4. Results or scores of fitness tests are ... Determine workshop format (1 hour, 1/2 day, full day) and agenda ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: School Health Planning


1
School Health Planning
2
www.healthcanada.ca/paguide
3
Guidelines
  • Accumulate at least 60 minutes of moderate
    physical activity and 30 minutes of vigorous
    physical activity each day

4
Active Health
5
Knowledge Health Strands
  • Safety of Self and Others (3.B)
  • Personal Development (4.A)
  • Social Development (4.B)
  • Mental-Emotional Development (4.C)
  • Personal Health Practices (5.A)
  • Active Living (5.B)
  • Nutrition (5.C)
  • Substance Use and Abuse Prevention (5.D)
  • Human Sexuality (5.E)

6
Planning for HE Integration Chart (Overview -18)
7
Grade Safety Topics (Overview-10)
8
Planning for Health Themes (Overview -19)
9
Example of a School Health Promotion
Planning (Appendices-6)
10
School Health Calendar Activity
11
Planning for Assessment
12
Fair Assessment
  • performance criteria clearly defined
  • students are informed
  • focuses on student learning
  • continuous and ongoing
  • meaningful
  • variety
  • involves students

13
Why assess?
for instructor evaluation
to motivate
to predict
to diagnose
to determine a starting point
for selection
for research
for placement
for grading students
to improve learning
for public relations
justification for change
for program evaluation
14
Manitoba Guidelines for Assessment, Evaluation,
and Reporting
15
Reporting Guidelines (p.197 Framework)
  • Review/develop assessment and reporting policies
    to align with new integrated PE/HE curriculum at
    local level
  • Final marks on report cards are stated as
    percentages for Grade 6 and up

16
  • Marks/grades are based on the learning outcomes
    (the 5 GLOs)
  • Weighting of marks is determined by the
    school/teacher with a higher weight on skills
  • Reporting on student learning outcomes that are
    potentially sensitive is a local decision

17
  • Information that is not reflective of the
    learning outcomes such as punctuality,
    attendance, dress and attitude should be reported
    separately
  • Behaviour can be part of the mark when it is
  • an integral part of the specific student learning
    outcomes
  • observable and measurable
  • serves as a performance descriptor

18
  • Fitness testing should not begin before Grade 4
  • Results or scores of fitness tests are reported
    separately and are not to be part of the final
    mark

19
  • for students with significant cognitive
    disabilities, use modifications ( Individual
    Education Planning A Handbook for Developing and
    Implementing IEPs, Early to Senior Years 1998)
  • for students with special needs and medical
    problems, use adaptations or accommodations to
    help students achieve the learning outcomes

20
Before we DO assessment we need to THINK ABOUT
what we are doing and why we are doing it.
21
In good teaching, curriculum, instruction and
assessment are woven together. They are
inseparable and as such, give coherence and
strength.
22
Design of the Assessment Column
  • Planning for Assessment of Learning Outcomes
    Chart (Overview-28 and Appendix G )

23
(No Transcript)
24
Suggestion for Assessment Column
  • Assessment strategy Title of the Activity
  • Assessor Assessment Tool
  • Directional Statement
  • Example
  • Suggested Criteria
  • BLM reference

25
Suggestions for Assessment Column
  • Example S.2.8.A.1a on page 8-58
  • Journal/Learning Log Personal Fitness Record
  • Self-Assessment Inventory
  • Have students write an action plan for a
    health-related fitness goal using the FITT
    principle and then record the activities in which
    they participated during a given time frame to
    work towards achieving their goal.
  • Suggested Criteria Students should be able to
  • set goals for the health-related fitness
    components
  • write an action plan using the FITT principle
  • keep a daily physical activity participation log

26
Suggestions for Assessment Column
  • Example S.2.8.A.1a on page 8-58 (continued...)
  • Performance Task All Activities
  • Self-Assessment Scoring Rubric
  • Have students rate their activity
    participation using a rubric developed by the
    class (or see the example on the previous page).
    Other criteria could be added.
  • Suggested Criteria The student
  • participates in warm-up and cool-down activities
    in an appropriate manner
  • performs exercises/activities that contribute to
    personal fitness development

27
Suggestions for Assessment Column
  • Example K.5.6.C.2 on pages 6-130/131
  • Questioning/Interview Human Opinion Line
  • Teacher Inventory
  • Observe students ability to identify the
    nutrition habits and fluid practices to support
    healthy participation in physical activities when
    responding to selected statements/questions.
  • (Sample questions provided)

28
Assessment Sharing in Partners or Groups
29
Movement
  • K.1.7.B.1 Examine external factors (i.e., cost,
    facility availability, practice opportunities
    outside school) that may affect movement skill
    development.

30
Fitness Management
  • S.2.7.A.1a Demonstrate behaviours (e.g., regular
    participation, correct and safe execution,
    appropriate intensity level, self-monitoring,
    self-discipline...) for personal fitness-goal
    attainment.

31
Safety
  • K.3.7.B.5a Describe scenarios that illustrate
    examples of physically, verbally, and emotionally
    abusive behaviours in different relationships
    (i.e., within families, between friends, among
    peers, with employers, groups, gangs, on sports
    teams, when babysitting).
  • K.3.7.A.5b Outline the emergency steps (e.g.,
    seeking help, administering basic first aid...)
    related to water incidents or accidents (e.g.,
    hypothermia, drowning...).

32
Personal and Social Management
  • K.4.7.B.1b Describe conduct (e.g., personal,
    group, team...) and ethical behaviours
    appropriate for engaging in physical activity
    and/or social events.

33
Healthy Lifestyle Practices
  • S.5.7.A.4 Apply decision-making/problem-solving
    strategies in case scenarios that focus on
    substance use and abuse (e.g., over-the-counter
    drugs, supplements, performance-enhancing drugs,
    tobacco, alcohol, street drugs, restricted
    drugs...)

34
Promoting Student Involvement
  • Healthy Active Five Routine

35
Exit Slip
  • 1. I liked………...
  • 2. I still wonder about…..
  • 3. Temperature Check……1 to 10 (1 is sinking and
    10 is swimming)

36
Planning for Instruction
  • Making Curricular Connections

37
Active Learning Strategies
  • Rotating Reel (e.g. 8-16, 8-48)
  • Bone Scavenger Hunt (6-126) BLM 6-8
  • Human Opinion Line (6-130)
  • Outer Space Orienteering (6-16)

38
Planning for PE Integration
  • Make learning active, interactive and fun!

39
Making PE and HE Connections
  • Use active learning strategies such as
  • Sort and Predict (e.g. Enigma)
  • Carousel Brainstorming (e.g. Consequence Circle)
  • Scavenger Hunts (e.g. Bone Scavenger Hunt)
  • Rotating Reel
  • Relays
  • Human Opinion Line
  • Word Splash

40
Making the PE/HE and Science Connection
41
5-8 Science Clusters
42
PE/HE and ELA Connection
  • STOP Stereotyping (8-92)
  • Stress Management Booklet

43
Yearly Planning
44
Traditional Athletic Program/Season
45
Movement Skills
46
Physical Activity Categories (Appendix A)
Individual/Dual Sports/Games
Team Sports/Games
Alternative Pursuits
Rhythmic/Gymnastic Activities
Fitness Activities
47
5 Personal and Social Management Skills
  • Goal setting/planning skills
  • Decision-making/problem-solving skills
  • Interpersonal skills
  • Conflict Resolution skills
  • Stress management skills

48
Health Knowledge Strands
  • Safety of Self and Others (3.B)
  • Personal Development (4.A)
  • Social Development (4.B)
  • Mental-Emotional Development (4.C)
  • Personal Health Practices (5.A)
  • Active Living (5.A)
  • Nutrition (5.C)
  • Substance Use and Abuse Prevention (5.D)
  • Human Sexuality (5.E)

49
(No Transcript)
50
An Example of Organizing the Year by GLOs
(Appendices-15)
51
Detailed Example of Organizing the Year by
General Learning Outcomes
  • Appendices -16 to 19

52
Assessment/Evaluation Planning
  • Plan with the end in mind the learning
    outcome(s)
  • Backward design
  • Know what you are looking for (criteria)
  • Clearly communicate criteria to students
  • Teach to the test
  • Play with a purpose

53
Unit Planning (Appendices -21)
  • Unit Planning Steps
  • target outcomes
  • backward design
  • Teach with Intent
  • What is the purpose of the activity? What will
    the students be learning?
  • Make curricular connections where possible
  • adapted from Jay McTighe, Grant Wiggins

54
1. Content Focus
  • Choose a strand or sub-strand, skill, theme, or
    physical activity/sport

55
2. Cluster the Outcomes
  • Read through grade-specific outcomes and identify
    the slos that are relevant or related to the
    topic (identify the knowledge outcomes and skill
    outcomes that fit)

56
3. Essential Questions
  • Determine the overarching essential questions
    that capture the essence of what the student will
    learn based on the cluster of outcomes.

57
4. Evidence
  • Identify the assessment strategy(ies) and tool(s)
    that will be used as acceptable evidence. For
    example
  • Observation Checklist
  • Performance Task (project) Scoring Rubric
  • Journal entry Inventory
  • Performance Task (Game) Checklist

58
5. Learning Experiences and Resources
  • Choose learning strategies, activities, and
    resources that will help students answer the
    essential questions. Make curricular connections
    where possible.

59
6. Re-design
  • How will we judge our unit designs?

60
Unit Planning Steps
  • Content Focus Choose a topic, skill or game
    theme, or physical activity/sport
  • Cluster Read through grade-specific outcomes and
    identify the slos that are relevant or related
    to the topic (identify the knowledge outcomes and
    skill outcomes that fit)
  • Essential Questions Determine the overarching
    essential questions that capture the essence of
    what the student will learn based on the cluster
    of outcomes.
  • Evidence Identify the assessment strategy(ies)
    and tool(s) that will be used as acceptable
    evidence. For example
  • Observation Checklist
  • Performance Task (project) Scoring Rubric
  • Journal entry Inventory
  • Performance Task (Game) Checklist
  • Learning Experiences and resources Choose
    learning strategies, activities, and resources
    that will help students answer the essential
    questions. Make curricular connections where
    possible.
  • Re-Design How will we judge our unit designs?

61
Lesson Planning (Appendices-27)
  • Include activating, acquiring, applying types of
    activities
  • Plan with the end in mind (the outcome)
  • Plan for safety, inclusion, maximum
    participation, success, etc.

62
Outcomes
  • K.2.5.A.1 Identify health-related fitness
    components (e.g., cardiovascular endurance,
    muscular endurance, muscular strength,
    flexibility, body composition...) and one example
    of an appropriate exercise/activity for each
    component (e.g., skip rope for cardiovascular
    endurance development...).
  • K.2.5.C.3 Show an understanding that stretching
    exercises for the major muscle groups should be
    held for a minimum length of time to be effective
    (e.g., as long as a stretch feels comfortable,
    which is usually 10 to 30 seconds with three to
    five repetitions...).

63
Outcomes
  • S.2.5.A.1a Demonstrate correct execution of
    exercises (e.g., keeping body straight for
    push-ups, keeping legs bent for curl-ups...)
    designed to improve and maintain personal fitness
    associated with health-related fitness
    components.
  • K.3.5.A.2 Show an understanding of safe
    stretching technique (e.g., sustained rather than
    bounce stretching, proper body alignment,
    keeping within the joints normal range of
    motion...) of selected exercises (e.g., calf
    stretch, modified hurdle stretch, arm circles...)
    in warm-up and cool-down routines.

64
Lesson Plan Example
65
Fitness Component Sub-Strand Outcomes
  • K.2.6.A.1 Recognize the health- and
    skill-related fitness components (e.g., agility,
    power, reaction time, speed, coordination…) that
    contribute to skill development.
  • K.2.7.A.1 Sort and classify physical
    activities/exercises (e.g., jogging, cycling,
    weight training, gymnastics...) that are best
    suited to developing each of the health-related
    fitness components (e.g., cardiovascular
    endurance, muscular endurance, muscular strength,
    flexibility, body composition…).
  • K.2.8.A.1 Identify the five health-related
    fitness components (e.g., cardiovascular
    endurance, muscular endurance, muscular strength,
    flexibility, body composition…) and their
    importance to a balanced fitness plan.

66
Warm-up/Cool-Down Sub-Strand Outcomes
  • K.2.6.C.3 Identify the proper techniques (e.g.,
    slow and sustained, within comfort zone, focusing
    on target muscles and minimizing other body
    parts, stretching to the limit of the movement,
    slow and rhythmical breathing...) and harmful
    techniques (e.g., bouncing, swinging, stretching
    too hard...) in stretching exercises.
  • K.2.7.C.3 Describe the purpose of a warm-up
    (e.g., increased circulation, increased body
    temperature, mental preparation, increased focus
    on task, prevention of injuries, improved
    performance...) and a cool-down (e.g., gradual
    lowering of heart rate, prevention of
    dizziness/blood pooling, minimized muscle
    stiffness/soreness...) for physical activity
    participation.
  • K.2.8.C.3 Identify three stages (i.e., indirect,
    direct, identical) of activity-specific warm-ups
    and examples of each stage for specific physical
    activities (e.g., a soccer warm-up could include
    light running, specific leg-stretching exercises,
    easy dribbling/passing drills...).

67
Active Participation Sub-Strand Outcomes
  • S.2.6.A.1a Participate in exercises/activities
    (e.g., juggling for developing coordination,
    moving through obstacle course for agility...)
    designed to improve and maintain personal fitness
    associated with health-related and skill-related
    fitness components.
  • S.2.7.A.1a Demonstrate behaviours (e.g., regular
    participation, correct and safe execution,
    appropriate intensity level, self-monitoring,
    self-discipline...) for personal fitness-goal
    attainment.
  • S.2.8.A.1a Participate in fitness activities
    that use the FITT principle and contribute to
    personal health-related fitness goals.

68
Exercise Safety Sub-Strand Outcomes
  • K.3.6.A.2 Determine how environmental conditions
    can influence safety while exercising outdoors
    (e.g., effects of ultraviolet rays, hot sunny
    weather can lead to heat exhaustion and sunburn,
    cold weather and high wind-chill factors increase
    risk of hypothermia and frostbite...).
  • K.3.7.A.2 Determine personal responsibilities
    (e.g., keep inhalator handy for asthmatic
    condition when participating in aerobic
    activities...) and risk levels (e.g., low
    personal strength/fitness level may result in
    back injury during lifting activities...) in
    performing specific exercises.
  • K.3.8.A.2 Identify the risks of contraindicated
    exercises (e.g., deep knee bends, straight leg
    sit-ups, full neck rotations...) and safe
    exercise alternatives.

69
Planning for Potentially Sensitive Content
  • Appendix C in the Framework (Decision Chart) and
  • Overview-20 in the Implementation document

70
Local Decision-Making Authority for Treatment of
Potentially Sensitive Content
  • School/Division/District Planning Process must be
    used to determine local policy related to
    potentially sensitive content
  • Schools must seek parental involvement
  • Schools must provide a parental option prior to
    implementation

71
Potential Decision Areas For School/Division/Distr
ict Planning
72
Potentially Sensitive Outcome Analysis Tool
73
Suggestions for Instruction
  • Puberty Changes
  • K.5.5.E.1b, K.5.5.E.1c, K.5.5.E.2 (page 3 of
    handout)
  • Video Thinkagain
  • K.5.7.E.3a (page 7 of handout)
  • Decide Model (BLM 8-5)
  • S.5.7.A.5

74
Learning Resources
  • The PE/HE Annotated Bibliography is available
    only online at http//www.edu.gov.mb.ca/ks4/learn
    res/bibliographies.html
  • All resources are available to borrow from the
    Department Library
  • To order, contact the Manitoba Textbook Bureau

75
Action Planning
  • Discuss next steps for sharing todays
    information with other staff and implementing
    this new curriculum in your school or
    division/district
  • Choose your target audience (administration,
    teachers, parents, students)
  • Determine actions, timelines, and
    responsibilities
  • Determine workshop format (1 hour, 1/2 day, full
    day) and agenda
  • Determine additional PD teacher training
  • Other?

76
Physically Active and Healthy Lifestyles for All
Students
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