SnowSports Industry Facts and Figures - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – SnowSports Industry Facts and Figures PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 31f5-MzBkN



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

SnowSports Industry Facts and Figures

Description:

... in equipment were the ski binding systems, soft boots and ... also a popular time for ski vacations, during Presidents Day weekend and Martin Luther King Day. ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:143
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 58
Provided by: SnowSports1
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: SnowSports Industry Facts and Figures


1
295
The Retail Marketplace Analysis
2003
SnowSports Industries America 8377-B Greensboro D
rive
McLean, VA 22102 (703) 556-9020
Prepared by Julie Lynch, Director of Market Rese
arch
2
Executive Summary
The 2002-03 winter sports season was the fourth
best ever for the industry. The season advanced
2.2 billion spent by consumers at specialty and
chain stores. This is up 4.1 from the previous
season of 2.1 billion. With more Specialty store
s on the East coast and abundant snowfall, these
types of stores led the advance with sales up
7.1 in dollars. Chain stores lagged behind 5.1
in dollars because of the slower than normal
sales in the Western half of the country.
Unit sales during the 2002-03 season were up 5.3
overall. Specialty store units gained 14.4 while
chain stores decreased 10.5. The big growth area
s in equipment were the ski binding systems, soft
boots and juniors. This was the biggest season ev
er for junior snow sports products 1,274,353
units were sold for 96.8 million. This is very
promising for the ski industry. The earlier we
get kids involved in snow sports the longer they
will participate. The trends for next season wil
l be seen in Alpine Touring/Telemark equipment.

3
Table Of Contents
INTRODUCTION.. .. .. .. .. .. .. 1
Average Snow Sports Retailer .. .. .. .. .. 2
CONSUMER SPENDING .. .. .. .. .. .. 3
Methodology and Sample Size .. .. .. .. 4
Specialty and Chain Store Information .. .. ..
5 Dollars Spent by Consumers at Specialty and C
hain Stores 2002-03 .. 6 Dollars Spent by Cons
umers at Specialty and Chain Stores
2001-02 .. 7 Dollars Spent by Consumers at Spec
ialty and Chain Stores 2000-01 .. 8
Dollar Spent by Consumers at Specialty and
Chain Stores 1999-00 .. 9 Sales () Five Year
Trend .. .. .. .. .. 10 Units Sold at Specialt
y and Chain Stores 2002-03 .. .. .. 11
Units Sold at Specialty and Chain Stores
2001-02 .. .. .. 12 Units Sold at Specialty and
Chain Stores 2000-01 .. .. .. 13
Units Sold at Specialty and Chain Stores
1999-00 .. .. .. 14 Specialty Store Retail Sale
s () Five Year Trend .. .. .. 15
Chain Store Retail Sales () Five Year
Trend .. .. .. 16 Retail Unit Sales Five Year
Trend .. .. .. .. 17 Retail Sales by Week for W
inter Sports Products .. .. .. 18

4
Table of Contents
Snow Sports Sales by Channel of Distribution..
.. .. 19 Alpine and Cross Country Equipment .. .
. .. 20 Average Retail Price of Alpine Skis ..
.. .. 21 Units Sold of Alpine Skis .. .. .. ..
22 Average Retail Price of Alpine Boots .. .. ..
23 Units Sold of Alpine Boots .. .. .. .. 24
Average Retail Price of Alpine Bindings .. .. .. 2
5 Units Sold of Alpine Bindings .. .. .. 26 Sn
owboard Equipment .. .. .. .. 27
Average Retail Price of Snowboards .. .. .. 28
Units Sold of Snowboards .. .. .. .. 29
Average Retail Price of Snowboard
Boots .. .. 30 Units Sold of Snowboard Boots ..
.. .. 31 Average Retail Price of Snowboard Bindi
ngs .. .. 32 Units Sold of Snowboard Bindings ..
.. .. 33
5
Ski/Snowboard Apparel .. .. .. .. 34
Accessories .. .. .. .. .. 35
Junior Products .. .. .. .. 36
Average Price Paid by Consumers at Specialty
Stores .. .. 37 Average Price Paid by Consumers
at Chain Stores .. .. 38 Product Mix of Total Wi
nter Sports Product Sales .. .. 39
Total Equipment Sold at Specialty and Chain
Stores .. .. 40 Total Apparel Sold at Specialty
and Chain Stores .. .. 41 Total Apparel Accessor
ies Sold at Specialty and Chain Stores .. 42
Total Equipment Accessories Sold at Specialty
and Chain Stores .. 43 OTHER SNOW SPORTS ACTIVITI
ES .. .. .. .. 44 Snowshoeing .. .. .. .. .. 44
Trends in Snow Sports .. .. .. .. 45 SNOW
SPORTS RELATED WEB SITES .. .. .. 49
BIBLIOGRAPHY .. .. .. .. .. 50

6
Are You Ahead of the Curve? How do your margins
on snow sports products compare to the average
retail shop? This report can be used to compare
your retail establishment performance to the
overall retail market place and help you examine
your business. It can be an important asset when
gaining credit lines from financial
institutions. In an effort to keep the snow sport
s industry professional informed, the information
in this report is gathered from many sources and
compiled by SnowSports Industries America (SIA)
especially for retail management. It is provided
in a PowerPoint format so you can use these
slides for your own presentations.
Special thanks to Leisure Trends for all their h
ard work on the Retail Audit.
The information contained in this report is the
property of SnowSports Industries America (SIA).
It cannot be reproduced or extracted in whole or
in part in any way without the prior written
permission of SIA.
7
Who is SIA?
SIA is the national, not-for-profit, member-owned
trade association of competing snow sports
companies. Working together, our members promote
and develop snow sports through a national trade
show, market development programs and other
special events. Membership in SIA is open to pr
oduct manufacturers, distributors, suppliers and
retail shops that are involved in the snow sports
industry and meet specific membership
requirements. For retail shops, membership
supports the development of winter sports through
public relations efforts and consumer programs,
while offering cost saving benefits, including
valuable industry research, shop links to SIAs
web site (www.thesnowtrade.org), professional
photographs for marketing use, competitive
discount programs with FedEx and more. Call SIA
(703)-556-9020 for more information about
membership and help continue making North America
the best snow sports market in the world.
8
INTRODUCTION
1
The retailer has a tremendous economic impact on
the winter sports industry. In each short season
(August to March), retailers sell over 2 billion
worth of equipment, apparel and accessories to
consumers in the U.S. Winter sports products a
re sold by different types of retailers. This
report concentrates on five types of retailers
which sell equipment, apparel and accessories
within winter sports. These retailers include
sports specialty (carry two or more categories of
sports), ski specialty, outdoor stores (hiking,
climbing, camping etc and also winter sports),
snowboard specialty and sporting goods chain (3
or more storefronts). This report does not
include mass merchants such as Wal-Mart and
Kmart, large mail orders companies or Internet
companies and department stores.
Throughout the last decade, the number of alpine
and cross country skiers has remained constant.
Participation rates for alpine skiing have ranged
between 7.4 and 12.4 million and for cross
country between 2.2 and 5.8 million. The newest
element in snow sports has been snowboarding. The
number of snowboarders has exploded in the last
10 years, increasing 367 since the start of the
decade from less than 1.2 to 5.6 million riders.
9
Average Snow Sports Retailer
2
Average selling space devoted to winter sports
products 3,134 square feet Average yield per squ
are foot 339 Percentage that keep their shop
open all year round 50 Percentage that carry a
lpine equipment 58 Percentage that carry snow
board equipment 62 Percentage that rent equipm
ent 48 (alpine skis) 58 (snowboard)
32 (cross country) Percentage that offer
mail order/catalog sales 7.5
Percentage that sell products from their web
site 21.8
Source 2001 SnowSports Retail Market Study
10
CONSUMER SPENDING
3
11
Methodology and Sample Size
4


The SIA Retail Audit uses a representative sample
of retail stores throughout the country that sell
alpine, cross country and snowboard merchandise.
These sample stores submit to Leisure Trends (the
market research firm which does this research for
SIA) their end-of-the-month sales and inventory
figures. Retail sales are tracked on a seasonal b
asis, August through March. The retail members
submit their data for August-October, November,
December, January, February, and March (6
reporting periods). Retailers are in urban, subur
ban and resort locations. In a normal year,
resort retail panel members report sales
beginning in the month of November.
The data from panel stores are used to create a
computer model that projects the sample data to
the total population of stores selling alpine,
cross country and snowboard merchandise.
Each year the panel is modified. These changes
are caused by any number of reasons including
closed stores, unwillingness to cooperate, data
integrity issues and panel refinement.
12
Specialty and Chain Store Information
5
The SIA Retail Audit defines specialty and chain
stores in this manner Specialty Stores Higher
priced merchandise More technical products An
nual average sales per store front 1.5 million
These are stores like Christys, Ski Market,
Alpine Hut, Kennys Double Diamond, Blades Board
Skate, Mesabi Chain Stores Lower priced merc
handise Less technical products These are stor
es like Garts, Oshmans, TSA, Dunhams, REI, Sports
Chalet Sales through mass merchants such as Wal-
Mart and Kmart, large mail order companies or
Internet companies and department stores are not
included in the SIA Retail Audit.


Due to confidentiality agreements between
Leisure Trends Group and retailers on the panel,
the list of participating retailers is not
available.
13
Dollars Spent by Consumers at Specialty
and Chain Stores
6
2002-2003 Season (August -March)
Apparel
Equipment
Accessories
Total
Specialty
476,179,598
662,255,120
575,114,038
1,713,548,756
(28)
(39)
(33)
(100)
Chain
190,170,816
487,572,541
149,366,438
148,035,286
(30)
(31)
(100)
(39)




______
______
______
______
666,350,414
724,480,476
810,290,406
2,201,121,297
(30)
(37)
(33)
(100)
Overall, the 2002/03 season advanced in dollars
sales to 2.2 billion or 4.1 spent by consumers
at specialty and chain stores. With more
Specialty stores on the East Coast and abundant
snowfall in this region of the country, these
types of stores led the advance, with sales up
7.1. Chain stores lagged behind 5.1 because of
the slower than normal sales in the Western half
of the country where the majority of snow sports
retailers are chain stores. Apparel and
accessories sales at chain stores took the
biggest hit (-10.0 and 11.4, respectively).
Equipment sales in specialty stores were flat
(-0.3) but up a healthy 10.7 at chains. The
biggest winner was accessories sales at specialty
store, up a whopping 18.6. In addition, due to
the cool winter weather in the East, apparel
sales gained 5.5 at specialty stores.
Source 2002-03 SIA Retail Audit
14
Dollars Spent by Consumers at Specialty
and Chain Stores
7
2001-2002 Season (August -March)
Apparel
Equipment
Accessories
Total
Specialty
451,235,852
664,102,348
484,957,388
1,600,295,589
(28)
(41)
(31)
(100)
Chain
211,250,819
513,650,000
168,646,355
133,752,827
(26)
(33)
(100)
(41)




______
______
______
______
662,486,671
653,603,743
797,855,175
2,113,945,588
(31)
(38)
(31)
(100)
Overall, the 2001/02 season fell slightly in
dollars sales (-4.8) to 2.1 billion spent by
consumers at specialty and chain stores.
Specialty stores sales were down 4.2 and chain
stores 6.4. Post 9/11 sales began to turn
upward, as it looked like the mountains would
become a refuge from the density of the city and
a place where people could reflect and find some
spiritual and physical nourishment. But it didnt
snow. Equipment sales at chain stores took the
biggest hit (-12.2). It was snowboard equipment
that consumers were not buying specifically in
its hot bed of Southern California. In addition,
accessories sales were slow in both specialty
(-9.2) and chain (-8.2). But overall, despite
the weather, interest in snow sports and
therefore sales, held up a lot better than
previous seasons when snow never fell.
Source 2001-02 SIA Retail Audit
15
Dollars Spent by Consumers at Specialty
and Chain Stores
8
2000-2001 Season (August -March)
Apparel
Equipment
Accessories
Total
Specialty
476,978,444
659,127,545
534,202,543
1,670,308,532
(29)
(39)
(31)
(100)
Chain
212,602,506
548,731,176
152,402,522
183,726,148
(28)
(33)
(100)
(39)




______
______
______
______
689,580,950
717,928,691
811,530,067
2,219,039,708
(37)
(31)
(32)
(100)
The 2000/01 season was the third best with 2.2
billion spent by consumers at specialty and chain
stores. The best season ever at 2.3 billion was
1999/00. This was due to heavy snowfall in the
late winter and early spring. Feb/Mar posted 814
million or 34 of the 1999/00 seasons sales
which pushed sales to an all-time high as
compared to Feb/Mar sales this season which were
490 million. This season was down 4.7 in
dollars but up 5.2 in units. The dollar sales
downturn was caused almost completely by the
average price drop of alpine ski equipment.
However, at the end of the 2000/01 season,
inventories were at their all-time low. The
industry lost sales because of low stock of the
best selling items. In most categories there was
an 80 or greater sell through. Specialty stores
saw a decline of 17 in apparel and 12 in
equipment sales however, a bright spot was
accessories sales which gained 6.
Source 2000-01 SIA Retail Audit
16
Dollars Spent by Consumers at Specialty
and Chain Stores
9
1999-2000 Season (August -March)
Apparel
Equipment
Accessories
Total
Specialty
571,923,757
742,464,015
490,109,097
1,804,496,869
(32)
(41)
(27)
(100)
Chain
200,751,871
522,890,848
152,861,352
169,277,625
(29)
(33)
(100)
(38)




______
______
______
______
772,675,628
659,386,722
895,325,367
2,327,387,717
(38)
(33)
(29)
(100)
The 1999/00 season was the biggest for the snow
sports industry in terms of dollars spent by
consumers at specialty and chain stores.
Consumers spent a whopping 2.3 billion.
Specialty stores saw increases in dollars spent
on apparel (9), equipment (1) and accessories
(12), while chain stores saw a decline of 29 in
equipment sales.
Source 1999-00 SIA Retail Audit
17
Sales () Five Year Trend
10
For the past five years, retail sales for winter
sports products have stayed relatively flat. The
largest year in history was the 1999/00 season
where sales tracked at 2.3 billion.
Source 1999-2003 SIA Retail Audit
18
Units Sold at Specialty and Chain Stores
11
2002-2003 Season (August -March)
Apparel
Equipment
Accessories
Total
Specialty
3,724,576
3,665,882
20,497,913
27,888,371
(13)
(13)
(73)
(100)
Chain
3,098,382
12,679,341
1,362,376
8,218,584
(11)
(65)
(100)
(24)




______
______
______
______
6,822,958
28,716,497
5,028,258
40,567,712
(12)
(17)
(71)
(100)
Overall units sales were up 5.3. Specialty store
units gained 14.4 while chain stores decreased
10.5. Overall, unit sales for apparel were flat
(-0.9) while dollars increased. This can be
explained by the higher average selling price
this season. The opposite was true in chain
store, where there were deals to be had in
apparel. Equipment in both specialty (1.6) and
chain (4.0) increased.
Source 2002-03 SIA Retail Audit
19
Units Sold at Specialty and Chain Stores
12
2001-2002 Season (August -March)
Apparel
Equipment
Accessories
Total
Specialty
3,668,849
3,609,097
17,097,854
24,375,801
(15)
(15)
(70)
(100)
Chain
3,218,286
14,164,347
1,309,824
9,636,237
(9)
(68)
(100)
(23)




______
______
______
______
6,887,135
26,734,091
4,918,921
38,540,148
(13)
(18)
(69)
(100)
Overall units sales were down 10.6, both
specialty (-10.3) and chain (-11.2) saw losses.
The accessories category led the way for unit
sale losses. Both specialty (-12.9) and chain
(-16.8) stores saw double digit declines. The
only bright spot was seen in apparel at chain
stores (8.3).
Source 2001-02 SIA Retail Audit
20
Units Sold at Specialty and Chain Stores
13
2000-2001 Season (August -March)
Apparel
Equipment
Accessories
Total
Specialty
3,851,615
3,682,671
19,627,806
27,162,092
(14)
(14)
(72)
(100)
Chain
2,971,891
15,942,963
1,383,217
11,587,855
(9)
(72)
(100)
(19)




______
______
______
______
6,823,506
31,215,661
5,065,888
43,105,055
(12)
(16)
(72)
(100)
Even though sales during the 2000/01 season were
down 5.4, units sold increased in both specialty
(2) and chain stores (17). Overall, the largest
gains were seen in the accessories category with
a 14 increase.
Source 2000-01 SIA Retail Audit
21
Units Sold at Specialty and Chain Stores
14
1999-2000 Season (August -March)
Apparel
Equipment
Accessories
Total
Specialty
4,913,077
3,914,013
17,801,068
26,628,158
(18)
(15)
(67)
(100)
Chain
2,788,752
13,614,972
1,280,953
9,545,267
(10)
(70)
(100)
(20)




______
______
______
______
7,701,829
27,346,335
5,194,966
40,243,130
(13)
(19)
(68)
(100)
During the 1999/00 season, units sold at
specialty and chain stores grew 11 over the
previous season. The largest growth was seen in
accessories at both specialty and chain stores,
an increase of 16 and 20, respectively.
Source 1999-00 SIA Retail Audit
22
Specialty Store Retail Sales () Five Year Trend
(Billions)
15
Specialty store dollar sales for the 2002-03 were
the second highest to date, tracking at 1.71
billion.
Source 1998-2003 SIA Retail Audit
23
Chain Store Retail Sales () Five Year Trend
(Millions)
16
Even with abundant snowfall in many parts of the
country, the 2002-03 season for chain stores was
one of the worst in the past five seasons. Sales
tracked at 488 million.
Source 1999-2003 SIA Retail Audit
24
Retail Unit Sales Five Year Trend (Millions)
17
Like retail sales, units have stayed relatively
consistent for the past five years. However,
there was a slight up tick during the 2000-01
season due to increases in unit sales at chain
stores.
Source 1998-2003 SIA Retail Audit
25
Retail Sales by Week for Winter Sports Products
18
End f October
End of Nov
End of Dec
End of Jan
End of Feb
End of March
This graphs shows the peaks and valleys of retail
sales by week during the season. The peak time
for winter sports product sales are the end of
November through end of December. There is also
an increase in sales during the end of January
through February when stores are trying to clear
out inventory with the end of the season sales.
This is also a popular time for ski vacations,
during Presidents Day weekend and Martin Luther
King Day.
26
Snow Sports Sales by Channel of Distribution
19
Other includes Ski Specialty (multiple stores),
Cross Country Specialty and Sporting Goods stores
(single shop)
Source 2000/01 SIA Distribution Study
27
Alpine and Cross Country Equipment
20
2002/03 SIA Retail Audit
These numbers reflect cross country equip sold in
ski/snowboard specialty and chain stores. It does
not take into account xc equip sold in Outdoor
specialty shops.
With the abundant snowfall in the East, alpine
ski equipment sales made positive gains. Skis
(including ski/binding integrated systems) (0.5
or 3,385 units), boots (4.8 or 38,224 units) and
poles (19.3 or 98,775 units) all increased in
unit sales. Alpine boots were clearly the unit
sales leader with a new product, alpine soft
boots, accounting for 5.7 of boot sales. Alpine
bindings declined in unit sales (-10.1 or
65,973) Cross country equipment sales held thei
r ground this year. Unit sales were up in boots
(10.3), bindings (2.7) and poles (13.6). Skis
were down 5.7. With the rising age of the Baby
Boomers, many are taking the sport up again. We
should see even more sales of cross country
equipment in the next couple of years.
28
Average Retail Price of Alpine Skis

21
Specialty Stores
Chain Stores
Source 2002/03 SIA Retail Audit
Fat Skis with wider dimensions than Midfat,
these are typically powder skis, waist dimensions
are typically over 80mm, shovels are typically
over 110mm Mid-fat Skis with normal sidecut, ove
rall dimensions are slightly wider than carve
waists, are typically over 66mm, shovels are
typically over 100mm Carve Skis with normal amou
nt of sidecut Skiboards Less than 110cm, have tw
in tip construction and are sold with
non-releasable bindings Twin-Tip Both tip and ta
il are upturned, allowing for riding in either
direction.
Percent difference between the average cost and
average retail selling price. For example If the
wholesale cost to the retailer is 50 and the
retail cost to consumer is 100, it would
therefore be a 50 margin.
29
Units Sold of Alpine Skis
22
Specialty Stores
Chain Stores

Source 2002/03 SIA Retail Audit
Fat Skis with wider dimensions than Midfat,
these are typically powder skis, waist dimensions
are typically over 80mm, shovels are typically
over 110mm Mid-fat Skis with normal sidecut, ove
rall dimensions are slightly wider than carve
waists, are typically over 66mm, shovels are
typically over 100mm Carve Skis with normal amou
nt of sidecut Skiboards Less than 110cm, have tw
in tip construction and are sold with
non-releasable bindings. Twin-Tip Both tip and t
ail are upturned, allowing for riding in either
direction Traditional skis These types of skis a
re not included on this chart, very few units are
sold
30
Average Retail Price of Alpine Boots
23
Specialty Stores
Chain Stores

Source 2002/03 SIA Retail Audit
High Performance Sold at the highest price
points, includes race boots Sport Performance Th
ese boots are sold at middle price points
Recreation These boots are sold at the lowest
price points
Percent difference between the average cost and
average retail selling price. For example If the
wholesale cost to the retailer is 50 and the
retail cost to consumer is 100, it would
therefore be a 50 margin.
31
Units Sold of Alpine Boots

24
Specialty Stores
Chain Stores
Source 2002/03 SIA Retail Audit
High Performance Sold at the highest price
points, includes race boots Sport Performance Th
ese boots are sold at middle price points
Recreation These boots are sold at the lowest
price points
32
Average Retail Price of Alpine Bindings
25
Specialty Stores
Chain Stores

Source 2002/03 SIA Retail Audit
Percent difference between the average cost and
average retail selling price. For example If
the wholesale cost to the retailer is 50 and the
retail cost to consumer is 100, it would
therefore be a 50 margin.
33
Units Sold of Alpine Bindings
26
Specialty Stores
Chain Stores

Source 2002/03 SIA Retail Audit
34
Snowboard Equipment
27

Source 2002-03 SIA Retail Audit
Today there are approximately 50 companies that
manufacture or distribute snowboards worldwide.
The snowboard equipment category stayed flat this
season, overall gaining only 0.4. Chains did
extremely well, up 14.2 in units. Specialty
stores experienced a 6.3 decrease which can be
attributed to kids not buying products. Bindings
did well this season (5.3) while snowboards
(-2.1) and boots (-1.4) lagged behind.
After doing really well in their introduction
season, snowdecks/skates, dropped slightly in
unit sales (-1.8).
35
Average Retail Price of Snowboards

28
Specialty Stores
Chain Stores
Source 2002/03 SIA Retail Audit
All Mountain Also includes BAM, race, carve and
powder boards Freeride Boards primarily for on m
ountain use (out of park/pipe use)
Freestyle Boards primarily for park/pipe use
Ride/style Combines attributes of freeride and
freestyle boards
Percent difference between the average cost and
average retail selling price. For example If the
wholesale cost to the retailer is 50 and the
retail cost to consumer is 100, it would
therefore be a 50 margin.
36
Units Sold of Snowboards
29
Specialty Stores
Chain Stores

Source 2002/03 SIA Retail Audit
All Mountain Also includes BAM, race, carve and
powder boards Freeride Boards primarily for on m
ountain use (out of park/pipe use)
Freestyle Boards primarily for park/pipe use
Ride/style Combines attributes of freeride and
freestyle boards
37
Average Retail Price of Snowboards Boots
30

Specialty Stores
Chain Stores
Source 2002/03 SIA Retail Audit
Step-in Used with step-in binding
Non step-in Meant to be used with strap binding
Percent difference between the average cost and
average retail selling price. For example If the
wholesale cost to the retailer is 50 and the
retail cost to consumer is 100, it would
therefore be a 50 margin.
38
Units Sold of Snowboards Boots

31
Specialty Stores
Chain Stores
Source 2002/03 SIA Retail Audit
Step-in Used with step-in binding
Non step-in Meant to be used with strap binding
39
Average Retail Price of Snowboards Bindings
32
Specialty Stores
Chain Stores

Source 2002/03 SIA Retail Audit
Step-in Step-in interface includes step-in high
back and plate binding Non step-in Two buckle- t
raditional strap binding
Percent difference between the average cost and
average retail selling price. For example If the
wholesale cost to the retailer is 50 and the
retail cost to consumer is 100, it would
therefore be a 50 margin.
40
Units Sold of Snowboards Bindings
33
Specialty Stores
Chain Stores

Source 2002/03 SIA Retail Audit
Step-in Step-in interface includes step-in high
back and plate binding Non step-in Two buckle-tr
aditional strap binding
41
Ski/Snowboard Apparel
34
Source 2002-03 SIA Retail Audit
Ski/Snowboard apparel did fairly well in
specialty stores (1.5) but not as well in
chains (-3.7). The biggest seller in chain
stores were apparel tops that were on sale from
last season or carry-over. Among individual
categories, tops, both alpine (3.6) and
snowboard (5.8), did well overall. It was in
the bottoms category that sales fell short,
alpine (-1.0) and snowboard (-2.6).
42
Accessories
35

Source 2002-03 SIA Retail Audit
The accessories product categories were chosen
based on their popularity among consumers.
Accessories have become an important part of
on-snow retail sales, making up 33 of all
dollars spent by consumers and representing 71
of unit sales. The 2002-03 season was great
season for accessories, almost all categories saw
increases. The largest increases were helmets
(23.6) and headwear (20.0).
43
Junior Products
36


This was the biggest season ever for Junior snow
sports products, 1,274,353 units were sold for
96.8 million as compared to the 2001/02 season
with 1,095,923 units sold for 90.5 million. This
was definitely the year of the big bang in junior
products, all categories made double-digit gains.
The largest gains were seen in the categories of
alpine boots (45.6) and shell parkas (87.5).
This is very promising for the ski industry. The
earlier we can get kids involved in snow sports
the longer they will participate. The only
category to see a loss was alpine bottoms (-10.7)
Source 2002-03 Retail Audit
44
Average Price Paid by Consumers at Specialty
Stores
37
( ) represent 2001/02
One of the most frequently asked questions is
How much does the average ski or snowboard
cost? Prices paid by consumers for on-snow
products have remained fairly consistent with
last season. Most changes in price were in the
10 and under range. There were three products
which decreased in price significantly compared
to last season at specialty stores. These
products were alpine skis (-15.40), ski/binding
integrated systems (-95.63) and snowshoes
(-27.24).
45
Average Price Paid by Consumers at Chain Stores
38
( ) represent 2001/02
Consistently, winter sports products sold in
chain stores sell for less then specialty stores.
In chains this season, alpine skis (-33.75),
ski/binding integrated systems (-116.54), cross
country skis (-11.59) and snowboards (-12.33)
saw price decreases. It seems that chain stores
cut equipment prices slightly to move product out
the door.
46
Product Mix of Total Winter Sports Product Sales
39


Source 2002-03 Retail Audit
47
Total Equipment Sold at Specialty and Chain
Stores
40
2002/03
Dollars
Units
Typically, about 78 of equipment is purchased
through specialty stores, with 22 sold through
chains. This chart shows that 55 of the total e
quipment sold (units) is alpine while 65 of
total equipment dollars is alpine. Total equipme
nt dollars have been shifting away from alpine
and toward snowboard. During the 1999/00 season
snowboard equipment represented 25 of total
equipment dollars, currently it represents 30.
Source 2002-03 SIA Retail Audit
48
Total Apparel Sold at Specialty and Chain Stores
41
2002-03
Units
Dollars
This chart shows the breakdown of apparel by
general product categories sold at specialty and
chain stores. Tops are comprised of parkas,
shells, vests, fleece tops and sweaters. Bottoms
include bibs, shell waist pants, insulated pants,
stretch pants, fleece pants and junior pants.
Suits are comprised of insulated suits, shell
suits, stretch suits and junior suits. Snowboard
apparel includes tops and bottoms.
Source 2002/03 SIA Retail Audit
49
Total Apparel Accessories Sold at Specialty and
Chain Stores
42
2002-03
Dollars
Units
The four largest apparel accessories categories
in terms of dollars (besides other) are base
layer (23), gloves, (17), headwear (15) and
socks (11). These four categories contribute
66 of dollar and 68 of unit sales.
Source 2002-03 SIA Retail Audit
50
Total Equipment Accessories Sold at Specialty and
Chain Stores
43
2002-03
Dollars
Units
Besides other, helmets and goggles are the
largest category contributing 20 and 19,
respectively, of the total dollar equipment
sales. However, the other category, which
contributes 30, contains items like wax, suntan
lotion, watches, etc.
Source 2002-03 SIA Retail Audit
51
OTHER SNOW SPORTS ACTIVITIES
44
Snowshoeing Even though snowshoes have been in ex
istence for hundreds of years, the activity has
recently experienced a resurgence. NSGA estimates
about 1,014,000 people experienced snowshoeing in
2000. The SIA Retail Audit indicates that
140,997 snowshoes were sold in specialty and
chain winter sports stores during the 2002-03.
This is an increase of 5.2 over the 133,974
units sold during the previous season. Industry
experts indicate that the growth of the sport is
due to the heightened interest in exercise and
family-oriented winter activities. Experts are
also quick to point out the short learning curve
and the low cost to get involved. The average
price of snowshoes paid by the consumer at a
specialty store during the 2002-03 season was
128 and shoes can be used with any winter boot
and normal outerwear. The demographics of snowsho
eing participation for the 2000 calendar year
are Gender Male 59.2 Female 40.8 Income
Under 15,000 7.7 Age 7 to 11 9.4
15,000 - 24,999 3.9 12 to 17 7.6
25,000 - 34,999 12.8 18 to 24 5.5
35,000 - 49,999 24.6 25 to 34 23.8
50,000 - 74,999 25.4 35 to 44 20.4
75,000 25.6 45 to 54 17.4
55 to 64 12.6 65 3
.4
Source 2001 NSGA Sports Participation Study
52
Trends in Snow Sports
45
Backcountry Each year more skiers, riders and oth
er winter adventure seekers discover the lure of
powder snow and head for the backcountry.
Backcountry offers freedom and untouched powder
for advanced skiers and snowboarders who want to
push their limits. Helicopter ski companies are
booming and ski resorts- especially those built
on National Forest Land- have responded by
opening entry gates to ungrounded glades and
bowls. Part of the boom in snowboarding is driven
by backcountry snowboarders who use boards which
split into a pair of skis for free heel touring
but snap back into a single unit for downhill
riding. Telemark skiing and Alpine Touring are
ways to access the backcountry.
Telemark Telemark is described as the free hee
l method of skiing. Telemark skiers can access
the backcountry or buy lift tickets and tear up
the slopes. With the development of the plastic
telemark boot, which provides more stabilty and
torsional stiffness than their leather
predecessors, more and more people are trying
telemark skiing. The plastic boots have helped
make telemarking more about dynamic, powerful
turns than casual touring. This has also helped
fuel the trend of stronger tele bindings and
increased the acceptance of wider, shaped skis
that can hold an edge in challenging conditions.
A new category that is emerging is the twin-tip
tele-ski designed specifically for terrain-park
tricks. Alpine Touring (Randonnee) While tele
mark gear is becoming more beefier, alpine
touring gear is becoming the choice for accessing
the backcountry. Alpine touring combines
free-heel climbing convenience with fixed heel
stability for downhill cruising. Alpine touring
allows for a free lifting heel for skiing uphill
but latches down for the descent so you can ski
downhill with a binding like a alpine resort rig.
Randonnee gear allows for people with alpine skis
to ski backcountry without having to learn a new
turn.
53
Trends in Snow Sports
46
Snowdecks/Snowskates Considered the new winter s
kateboard, snowdecks/snowskates are becoming one
of the fastest growing trends in winter sports.
Decks are essentially a snowboard without
bindings (or skateboard without wheels) for
sliding on snow, rails, tables, etc. The snowdeck
consists of an upper and lower deck separated by
two risers with skateboard like construction on
the upper deck and a snowboard-like lower deck.
While designed for tricks, this design greatly
enhances a riders ability to carve turns. Riders
can practice tricks they do in the streets on the
snow. Soft Shell Apparel Soft shell is an eme
rging apparel category that currently offers
highly breathable garments that are also
abrasion-resistant and wind-resistant. They offer
stretch and water repellency and are designed to
replace two layers (the inner/insulating and hard
shell outer layers of a traditional
outdoor-apparel layering system) within one
garment. This is the first generation product to
replace multiple shells and insulating layers
into one soft shell garment. It is a garment
which you can wear closer to your body without
restricting movement. Alpine Soft Boots Follo
wing in the wake of snowboard boots, soft boots
could be the future of alpine. The current hard
plastic of the boot has been sliced off the top
of the boot shell and replaced with soft, fabric
like flaps of waterproof artificial leather or
plastic. The goal was to make boots warmer, more
comfortable and much easier to put on and take
off. These boots are aimed at the casual skiers-
those that dont ski aggressively enough that
theyre willing to struggle with a stiff,
high-performance shell.
54
Trends in Snow Sports
47
Ski/Binding Integrated Systems
Integrated which means a pre-assembled set of
skis, plates and bindings for one price.
Women Specific Products More and more manufactu
rers are seeing the value in making winter sports
products geared specifically to women. The
physical differences between men and women
account for differences in how the two sexes ski,
snowboard and snowshoe. In the past couple of
seasons, manufacturers are devoting new product
lines to women in alpine, snowboard and snowshoe.
Currently there is one snowboard company devoted
to making snowboards specifically for women.
Skiboards Skiboards look like they are construc
ted for Santas elves. They are snow-sliding
tools that have elements of both traditional ski
and snowboards. They are miniature snowboards,
ranging in size from approximately 76 cm to 99
cm, - that strap to traditional ski boots and can
be used for learning to ski, carving, cruising
runs, floating through powder, skating on flats
and catching big air. Fueling the growth of
skiboards is its short learning curve. It can be
picked up in two days or less, partially because
balancing on skiboards is as easy as walking. The
sensation is similar in ways to skiing and
snowboarding, but the independent leg action and
toned-down feeling closely resembles in-line
skating. They are an easy transition into the
world of winter sports. In addition, one set of
skiboards can be used by the entire family since
one size skiboard fits almost any boot, with a
simple adjustment of the non-releasable binding.
Skiboarding is a huge hit among the Echo Boomers
(kids between the ages of 12 and 24). As
skiboards have gained in popularity, the original
skiboarders have since moved on to longer twin
tips in order to ride faster, float better and go
bigger when performing high level tricks.
Twin Tip Skis These type of skis are used for f
reestyle jumping with flipping and twisting in
half pipes. The ESPN X-Games has helped launch
this product with the youth movement.
55
Trends in Snow Sports
48
Snowtubing Snowtubing is becoming a hot trend at
ski resorts across the country. Snowtubing is
just like tubing down the river except you do it
on snow. Currently 43 of resorts offer
snowtubing. It is most prevalent at resorts in
the Southeast (83), followed by Northeast (51),
the Midwest (39), Rocky Mountains (29) and
Pacific West (31). During the 2002/03 season, at
resorts that offer snowtubing, the average number
of snowtubing visits recorded was 17,378 which
was up 9.2 from last season. Resorts began
offering snowtubing as an alternative activity in
the 1996-97 season. The peak years of
introduction were 1999/00 (23) and 1997/98
(19). The rate of introduction has slowed with
only 2 resorts adding tubing for the first time
in 2002/03. Ski Bikes The snow bike or ski bik
e is a specially-engineered bike-like device with
skis instead of wheels designed to use the force
of gravity to descend snow covered mountains. The
inherent characteristics of the bike allow you to
navigate the mountain with a greater degree of
control than other snow-riding tools. Generally,
with practice, you can ride any terrain that
would normally be negotiated on skis. There are
currently about four manufacturers which make ski
bikes. The bikes have been around Europe for 50
years. Please refer to www.ski-bike.org for more
information.
56
SNOW SPORTS RELATED WEB SITES
49
SIA Sites www.thesnowtrade.org Association
site www.snowlab.com Consumer site www.wint
erfeelsgood.com National PR Campaign
www.wintertrails.org Winter Trails Snowshoe
Program www.snowlink.com Consumer site Indust
ry Media and Association (Trade) Sites
www.nsaa.org National Ski Areas Association
www.psia.org Professional Ski Instructors
Assn. www.saminfo.com Ski Area Management w
ww.outdoorindustry.org Outdoor Industry News
Consumer Snow Sports Sites www.powdermag.com
Powder Magazine www.snowboard.com Snowboard
www.skinet.com Ski news site
www.skiracing.com Racing news
www.twsnow.com Transworld Snowboarding Site
www.skipressmag.com Ski Press Magazine
www.skimag.com SKI Magazine
www.Freeskier.com Freeskier Magazine
www.skiingmag.com SKIING Magazine
www.freezeonline.com Freeze Magazine
Olympic Sites www.usoc.org U.S. Olympic
Committee www.usskiteam.com U.S. Ski Team Info


57
BIBLIOGRAPHY
50

SIA Retail Audit Report, Leisure Trends Group
Methodology National sales volumes accumulated
by a store panel collection of retail accounts
including both specialty ski and chain stores.
SnowSports Industries America 8377-B Greensboro
Drive, McLean, VA 22102 (703) 506-4211 or
sales_at_thesnowtrade.org NSAA Kottke National End
of Season Survey, Rosall, Remen, Cares.
Lakewood, CO. Methodology Survey of business
volume taken annually of NSAA resort area members
at the end of each season. To order, NSAA 133
South Van Gordon St, Suite 300 Lakewood, CO
80228 (303) 987-1111. NSGA Sports Participatio
n Study SnowSports, National Sporting Goods
Association, 1601 Feehanville Drive, Suite 300 Mt
Prospect, IL 60056-6035 (847) 296-NSGA.
SIA offers many research reports to both members
and non-members. Please contact our National
Sales and Marketing Manager Chris Semon at
703.506.4211 or sales_at_thesnowtrade.org
About PowerShow.com