Creating Schools for the 21st Century - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Creating Schools for the 21st Century PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: 31c61-MGQ5Y



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Creating Schools for the 21st Century

Description:

... questions, what follows in its wake is often an endless flood of trivia and fashion. ... whether an entire generation of kids will fail to make the grade ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:233
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 59
Provided by: bether
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Creating Schools for the 21st Century


1
Creating Schools for the 21st Century
  • A way to synergize our work
  • Beth Ratway
  • beth.ratway_at_dpi.wi.gov

2
When the question 'What's new?' is pursued at
the expense of all other questions, what follows
in its wake is often an endless flood of trivia
and fashion. I wish to be concerned with the
question 'What is best?' for this question cuts
deeply, rather than broadly sweeping over
everything."
  • Robert Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle
    Maintenance

3
You have been asked to present at a congressional
hearing on NCLB they are wondering what are the
knowledge, skills and dispositions students need
for the 21st century?
4
Overview
This is a story about the big public
conversation the nation is not having about
education… whether an entire generation of kids
will fail to make the grade in the global economy
because they cant think their way through
abstract problems, work in teams, distinguish
good formation from bad, or speak a language
other than English. How to Build a Student for
the 21st Century, TIME Magazine, December 18, 2006
5
Stop asking me if were almost there! Were
nomads, for crying out loud!
6
What do our students need to know and be able to
do in the 21st century?
7
State Superintendents High School Task Force
  • Move outside of existing structures and pursue
    innovation
  • Engage students in rigorous, authentic learning
    experiences that are relevant to their learning
    needs and future ambitions
  • Create smaller learning environments require
    individualized learning plans
  • Promote school, parent, business, and community
    partnerships


7
8
Summit on 21st Century Skills
Preparing Students for Work, Postsecondary
Education, and Citizenship March 14, 2007
8
9
Summit on 21st Century Skills
  • Sponsors
  • Competitive Wisconsin, Inc.
  • The Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction
  • The University of Wisconsin System
  • The Wisconsin Technical College System
  • Wisconsin Association of Independent Colleges and
    Universities
  • Attendees
  • Business, Labor and Commerce Leaders
  • Legislators
  • Representatives from Community Organizations and
    Non-educational Government Agencies

9
10
Summit on 21st Century Skills Focus Group Question
  • If you were to advise an 8th grade student in
    preparing him/her to work for your company 5-10
    years from now, what are the skills, knowledge,
    and abilities you believe would be essential to
    develop?
  • What are the 21st century skills that will
    sustain and grow a vibrant, global economy?
  • What should be expected of todays students so
    they can be effective citizens and leaders in our
    communities?

10
11
Summit on 21st Century Skills What did we
find?
  • Most often discussed among groups were
    Learning Thinking Skills and Life Skills
  • critical-thinking and problem solving
  • collaborative communications skills
  • people skills
  • contextual learning skills
  • personal responsibility
  • ethics
  • adaptability (nimbleness)

http//www.dpi.wi.gov/cal/businesssummit.html
12
American Diploma Project
Partnership for 21st Century
  • Rigor and Relevance for 21st Century
  • Engage stakeholders to ensure that every student
    graduates prepared.
  • Align high school standards to postsecondary and
    workforce expectations.
  • Focus initially on English language arts and
    mathematics.

12
13
Current National Debate
13
14
Partnership for 21st Century Skills enter the
debate
15
Partnership for 21st Century Skills
Learning and Innovation Skills
Core Subjects 21st Century Themes
Life Career Skills
Information, Media, and Tech Skills
Standards Assessment
Curriculum Instruction
Professional Development
Learning Environments
15
16
Core subjects - RIGOR
  • State Standards
  • ADP
  • Grade Level Foundations

17
What do you have in place?
18
21st century Themes (Relevance)
  • Grade Level Foundations

19
21st Century themes
  • Every generation of Americans wants our schools
    to prepare students for success in work and life.
    Today, business and education leaders agree that
    some content is missing from state and local
    standards and requirements for most students.
    This new content represents essential knowledge
    for the 21st century.

20
20
21
What are we doing to address Themes
  • Global
  • International Education Council
  • http//dpi.wi.gov/cal/interntled.html
  • Civic
  • Service learning
  • http//dpi.wi.gov/fscp/slt4dist.html
  • Health
  • Health Standards
  • http//dpi.wi.gov/sspw/skills_healthB.html
  • Health Assessments
  • http//dpi.wi.gov/sspw/pdf/hlahiv.pdf
  • http//dpi.wi.gov/sspw/class_hlth.html
  • Financial, Economic
  • Personal financial literacy standards
  • http//dpi.wi.gov/standards/pdf/pfl.pdf


21
22
What do you have in place?
23
Life and Career skills
  • Skills Assessment
  • Career pathways
  • Project Lead the Way
  • STEM
  • Career Development
  • http//dpi.wi.gov/pubsales/stw6a.html

24
Life and Career Skills
  • Flexibility and Adaptability
  • Initiative and Self-Direction
  • Social and Cross-Cultural Skills
  • Productivity and Accountability
  • Leadership and Responsibility

www.21stcenturyskills.org
24
25
Information, Media and technology skills
  • Information technology standards
  • http//dpi.wi.gov/imt/itls.html

26
Information, Media and Technology Skills
  • Information Literacy
  • Media Literacy
  • Information, Communications, and Technology
    Literacy

27
Learning and innovation skills
  • School Counselors
  • Library Media Specialists
  • ELL
  • Special Education
  • Failing Forward
  • 7 Habits
  • Habits of Mind
  • http//dpi.wi.gov/sspw/scstudentstandards.html

28
Learning and Innovation Skills
  • Creativity and Innovation
  • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
  • Communication and Collaboration

www.21stcenturyskills.org
28
29
How are we focusing on the skills
Inquiry, Critical thinking and problem solving
Skills (Critical thinking and systems thinking,
Problem identification, formulation and solution,
creativity, innovation and intellectual
curiosity)
Knowledge acquisition Skills (concept
development, learning how to learn)
REFLECTION
Information and communication
Skills (information and media literacy, ICT
literacy (communication skills))
Interpersonal and self-directional
skills (Interpersonal and collaborative skills,
self-direction, accountability, adaptability,
social responsibility)
29
30
What do you have in place?
31
Support Systems
32
What are we doing
  • Standards and Assessment
  • ADP and Foundations
  • http//www.achieve.org/
  • http//dpi.wi.gov/standards/
  • Assessment
  • Balanced assessment system
  • http//dpi.wi.gov/oea/
  • Curriculum and Instruction
  • Vertical Teams
  • http//dpi.wi.gov/cal/pdf/verticalteambrochure.pdf
  • Professional Development
  • Characteristics of High-Quality PD
  • Wisconsin Professional Development Model
  • SEC
  • http//www.ccsso.org/Projects/Surveys_of_Enacted_C
    urriculum/
  • Learning Environments
  • Standards of the Heart
  • http//dpi.wi.gov/sspw/foster_heart.html
  • School Counseling Standards and programs

33
Standards and Assessment
34
Standards
  • Focuses on 21st century skills, content knowledge
    and expertise.
  • Builds understanding across and among core
    subjects as well as 21st century
    interdisciplinary themes
  • Emphasizes deep understanding rather than shallow
    knowledge
  • Engages students with the real world data, tools,
    and experts they will encounter in college, on
    the job, and in life--students learn best when
    actively engaged in solving meaningful problems
  • Allows for multiple measures of mastery

35
Assessment
  • Supports a balance of assessments, including
    high-quality standardized testing along with
    effective classroom formative and summative
    assessments
  • Emphasizes useful feedback on student performance
    that is embedded into everyday learning
  • Requires a balance of technology-enhanced,
    formative and summative assessments that measure
    student mastery of 21st century skills
  • Enables development of portfolios of student work
    that demonstrate mastery of 21st century skills
    to educators and prospective employers
  • Enables a balanced portfolio of measures to
    assess the educational systems effectiveness at
    reaching high levels of student competency in
    21st century skills

36
Balanced Assessment System
Ongoing Periodic Benchmark
Large-Scale Evaluation Strategies
Assessments
Assessments (Formative) (Summative)
Daily, Ongoing Monthly, Quarterly
Annually
Student-Centered Classroom, School-Centered
District, State-Centered
37
Authentic Instruction and Assessment
  • Construction of Knowledge
  • Disciplined Inquiry
  • Value Beyond School
  • In A Guide to Authentic Instruction and
    Assessment Vision, Standards and Scoring by
    Newmann, Secada, Wehlage, (1995), page 64.

38
Rigor and Relevance Framework
  • International Center for Leadership in Education
  • http//www.leadered.com/rigor.html

39
Knowledge Taxonomy
  • 1. Awareness
  • 2. Comprehension
  • 3. Application
  • 4. Analysis
  • 5. Synthesis
  • 6. Evaluation

40
Application Model
  • 1. Knowledge in one discipline
  • 2. Application within discipline
  • 3. Application across disciplines
  • 4. Application to real-world predictable
    situations
  • 5. Application to real-world unpredictable
    situations

41
Rigor/Relevance Framework
Knowledge
Application
1
2
3
4
5
42
Levels
Blooms
C D A B
6
5
4
3
2
1 2 3 4 5
1
Application
43
Rigor/Relevance Framework
Teacher/Student Roles
KNOWLEDGE
D
C
Student Think Work
Student Think
B
A
Student Work
Teacher Work
A P P L I C A T I O N
44
Curriculum and Instruction
  • Teaches 21st century skills discretely in the
    context of core subjects and 21st century
    interdisciplinary themes
  • Focuses on providing opportunities for applying
    21st century skills across content areas and for
    a competency-based approach to learning
  • Enables innovative learning methods that
    integrate the use of supportive technologies,
    inquiry- and problem-based approaches and higher
    order thinking skills
  • Encourages the integration of community resources
    beyond school walls

45
Curriculum
  • Fundamental Questions (school wide tied to vision
    and mission)
  • Backwards Design - Wiggins
  • Concepts/Big Ideas (use standards)
  • Focusing questions (use standards)
  • Assessments (formative and summative)
  • Instruction
  • Resources

46
Authentic Instruction
  • 1. Higher-Order Thinking
  • lower-order thinking only 1... 2... 3... 4...
    5... higher-order thinking is central
  • 2. Depth of Knowledge
  • knowledge is shallow 1... 2... 3... 4... 5...
    knowledge is deep
  • 3. Connectedness to the World Beyond the
    Classroom
  • no connection 1... 2... 3... 4... 5... connected
  • 4. Substantive Conversation
  • no substantive conversation 1... 2... 3... 4...
    5... high-level substantive conversation
  • 5. Social Support for Student Achievement
  • negative social support 1... 2... 3... 4... 5...
    positive social support
  • http//pdonline.ascd.org/pd_online/diffinstr/el199
    304_newmann.html

47
Professional Development
  • Highlights ways teachers can seize opportunities
    for integrating 21st century skills, tools and
    teaching strategies into their classroom practice
    and help them identify what activities they can
    replace/de-emphasize.
  • Balances direct instruction with project-oriented
    teaching methods
  • Illustrates how a deeper understanding of subject
    matter can actually enhance problem-solving,
    critical thinking, and other 21st century skills.
  • Enables 21st century professional learning
    communities for teachers that models the kinds of
    classroom learning that best promotes 21st
    century skills for students
  • Cultivates teachers ability to identify
    students particular learning styles,
    intelligences, strengths and weaknesses
  • Helps teachers develop their abilities to use
    various strategies (such as formative
    assessments) to reach diverse students and to
    create environments that support differentiated
    teaching and learning
  • Supports the continuous evaluation of students 
    21st century skills development
  • Encourages knowledge sharing among communities of
    practitioners, using face-to-face, virtual and
    blended communications
  • Uses a scaleable and sustainable model of
    professional development

48
Questions to frame all PD
  • What do we want all students to know and do?
    (Rigor)
  • Why should our students learn this? (Relevance)
  • What do we need to know to help students achieve
    (to improve students achievement)
  • How will we get them there?
  • How will we chart students progress toward our
    goals?
  • What will we do when students are not achieving
    or have already achieved our goals?

49
Learning Environments (Relationships)
  • Creates learning practices, human support and
    physical environments that will support the
    teaching and learning of 21st century skill
    outcomes
  • Supports professional learning communities that
    enable educators to collaborate, share best
    practices and integrate 21st century skills into
    classroom practice
  • Enables students to learn in relevant, real world
    21st century contexts (e.g., through
    project-based or other applied work)
  • Allows equitable access to quality learning
    tools, technologies and resources
  • Provides 21st century architectural and interior
    designs for group, team and individual learning.
  • Supports expanded community and international
    involvement in learning, both face-to-face and
    online

50
Standards of the Heart
  • 1. Core Values School and community members
    identify citizenship qualities such as honesty
    and responsibility that all agree to foster in
    children. These qualities are modeled by staff
    and students alike and set the standard for
    acceptable behavior.
  • 2. Safe and Orderly Places Students and staff
    feel respected, and the climate and culture of
    the school is drug free and safe from any form of
    violence. Children and adults learn constructive
    ways to settle differences, and peaceful conflict
    resolution is the norm.
  • 3. Family and Community Involvement The
    contributions of all who make up the school
    community are honored and celebrated. Parents,
    caregivers, and community members have a variety
    of opportunities to make meaningful contributions
    to school programming and student citizenship
    development.
  • 4. Address Societal Issues Prevention of risk
    behaviors such as violence, alcohol and other
    drug abuse, AIDS/HIV, and teen pregnancy are a
    valued part of the school's programs. Services
    are available to students and staff who may be
    facing such issues in their own lives.
  • 5. Positive Relationships Students feel
    personally known and cared for by at least one
    adult in the school. Students and community
    members are viewed as resources for supporting
    one another.
  • 6. Engage Students' Minds Schools use many
    strategies and approaches to make learning
    relevant for students. Classrooms are interactive
    places that often take learning beyond the
    schoolhouse door.
  • 7. High Expectations Students are expected to do
    their best and experience success. All students
    and staff are expected to model positive
    behaviors that embody good citizenship.

51
What do you have in place?
52
How can you move forward?
53
Critical Collaborative Conversations (all must
involve business leaders, community members,
higher education and educators…)
  • Using the themes and skills
  • The Why Committee
  • Why are we doing this? What is our purpose?
  • Develop a mission and vision
  • The What Committee
  • What is important for all teachers
    administrators, community members and students to
    know and do as connected to our mission and
    vision?
  • Vertical Conversations (across grades)
  • Horizontal conversations (across disciplines)
  • Connected Conversations (among groups)
  • The How Committee
  • How will we structure the learning for everyone?
  • How will we know we are achieving our mission and
    vision?
  • Adult learning and student learning should ALWAYS
    connect!

54
21st Century Learning Themes and Outcomes
Standards and Assessments Curriculum and
Instruction Professional Development Learning
Environments
Mission and Vision for 21st Century School
Info Media Technology Skills
Learning Innovation Skills
Life Career Skills
21st Century Themes
Are there currently intersections? Should there
be intersections?
54
55
Conclusion
There is remarkable consensus among educators
and business and policy leaders on one key
conclusion we need to bring what we teach and
how we teach into the 21st Century. TIME
Magazine, December 18, 2006
56
World Café on Charter Schools
  • In 2010, you open up your local paper to read the
    headline
  • Wisconsin Charter Schools Receives National
    Award.
  • Wisconsin received this award from businesses,
    educators, parents and students for our success
    in preparing students for life in the 21st
    century.
  • How does the article describe your
    accomplishments?
  • What was the key to your success?

57
My challenge to you
  • During your work continually ask yourself
  • How can we all work together towards this
    common purpose to prepare all kids for the 21st
    century?

58
The only man who is educated is the man who has
learned how to learn...how to adapt and change.
  • Carl Rogers, Freedom to learn, 1969

59
Resources
  • Self Assessment Handbook
  • http//dpi.wi.gov/ssos/pdf/dsahandbk.pdf
  • High School Task Force
  • http//dpi.wi.gov/sprntdnt/pdf/hstask_report.pdf
  • Citizenship Toolkit
  • http//dpi.wi.gov/sspw/pdf/citizentoolkit.pdf
  • Career Development
  • http//dpi.wi.gov/sspw/sccareer.html
About PowerShow.com