Iron Maiden in the Polka Rack: The Genre of Standardized Writing - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Iron Maiden in the Polka Rack: The Genre of Standardized Writing PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: 2d04f-MzU3M



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Iron Maiden in the Polka Rack: The Genre of Standardized Writing

Description:

... including video games, movies, songs, etc. has negative effects on ... promoting instant success, such as American Idol, Making the Band, and Star Search. ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:421
Avg rating:5.0/5.0
Slides: 72
Provided by: djo53
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Iron Maiden in the Polka Rack: The Genre of Standardized Writing


1
Iron Maiden in the Polka RackThe Genre of
Standardized Writing
Dean Johnson National Writing Project At Rowan
University Winter Conference January 9, 2007

2
Take a memo
  • What makes a good memo?

3
Take a memo
  • Write a memo
  • You are a school administrator who has had
    several complaints from both teachers and
    students about teachers eating in classrooms
    while students are in class and when classroom is
    unoccupied. Some of the complaints were about
    cleanliness and the danger of attracting pests,
    while others were about fairness.
  • Write a memo to your staff stating your position
    on this issue. Support your position with
    specific details.

4
Take a memo
  • Highly structured
  • Specific heading
  • Purpose immediately stated
  • Short paragraphs
  • Brief
  • Humor?
  • Compositional risk?
  • Certain expectations from readers

5
Genre is as genre does
  • If we combine together content, style, and
    structure, the result is genre.
  • Genre provides a writer with a pre-prepared and
    labeled package of constraints. It is what turns
    composing from being a problem solving activity
    into a largely a pattern-matching one.
  • Mike Sharples
  • How We Write

6
The Genre of Standardized Writing
  • Persuasive Essay
  • Narrative Writing (Picture Prompt)
  • Open-Ended Questions

7
Lobotomized Weasel
  • Todays educational establishment is making
    actual illiteracy look good Writing, which ought
    to nurture and give shape to thought, is instead
    being used to pound it into a powder and then
    reconstitute it into gruel.
  • the idea that there is some specifiable way to
    write an essay is just hoo-ha made up by some
    bureaucrat in 1987.
  • The people who create and enforce the templates
    are, not to put too fine a point on it, people
    without understanding or imagination, lobotomized
    weasels for whom any effort of thought exceeds
    their strength.
  • Crispin Sartwell
  • LA Times 5/20/04

8
  • Am I a Lobotomized Weasel?

9
Iron Maiden in the Polka RackThe Genre of
Standardized Writing
  • The Five Paragraph Essay Problem
  • Pressure
  • Rubrics
  • Research
  • Activities

10
How did we get here?
  • I believe it was the scoring rubric of the
    standardized test and pressure to teach our
    students how to be successful based on that
    rubric that resulted in formula writing.
  • Glenda Moss, PhD
  • Assistant Professor
  • School of Education
  • Indiana Univeristy
  • NWP Quarterly
  • Summer 2002

11
How did we get here?
  • By teaching students to write passing essays,
    according to Elizabeth Rorschach, we end up
    with generic student essays, compositions so
    predictable that we dont really need to finish
    reading them
  • we know from the first paragraph what the rest
    of the essay is going to say.
  • End up with writing with no fresh truth to it.
  • The Five-Paragraph Theme Redux
  • NWP Quarterly
  • vol. 26, no. 1

12
Pressure to Perform
13
Pressure to Perform
14
Rubrics
15
Rubrics
16
Rubrics
17
Rubrics
18
Rubrics
19
Rubrics
20
Do we need yet another genre?
  • Standardized tests require a specific
    performance of specific literate abilities in a
    specific context with contrived (unnatural)
    language.
  • teachers need to find ways to help students
    make their literate abilities visible
  • Dr. Frank Serafini
  • Assistant Professor of Literacy Education
  • University Nevada Las Vegas

21
The Audience
  • Reader/Evaluator Position
  • Hours Readers are hired on a temporary basis
    by project but are expected to work five days per
    week, Monday through Friday. The daytime
    schedule is 815 am to 400 pm with a 45 minute
    unpaid lunch break. Evening shift is 500 pm to
    1015 pm with a half-hour unpaid dinner break.
    Additional paid break times are scheduled.
  • Source MI Employment Application

22
The Audience
  • Pay The starting pay is 10.10 per hour. Pay
    increases after the successful completion of
    three major projects.
  • Source MI Employment Application

23
The Audience
  • Look, we do know in the beginning how many
    papers we have to score, how many people we have
    and how many days there are to do it, and
    mathematically we can come up with a number of
    employees per project.
  • It isnt profitable and Measurement
    Incorporated is a profit-making company for us
    to keep on someone who is scoring less than half
    of what the average room rate is. There are
    deadlines we must meet.
  • Jo Davidson, Scoring Manager
  • Measurement Incorporated
  • source Washington Post article
  • Feb. 24, 2002

24
The Audience
  • According to Davidson, 70 accuracy in scoring is
    acceptable and the industry standard.
  • Scoring rate according to Davidson is 60 booklets
    per day.
  • Graders said some graders averaged 90 and allege
    being pushed to complete as many as 100 test
    booklets a day
  • source Washington Post

25
The Audience
  • According to scorer Amy Weivoda, the real
    inadequacy of the standardized testing process
    is the relationship the kid, the testee, had
    with me, the test scorer.
  • Weivoda saw herself as underpaid, treated
    without dignity and reminded daily that she was
    disposable

26
The Audience
  • instead of the professionals Id envisioned
    painstakingly grading exams, I found a room full
    of temporary employees who had little respect for
    and minimal investment in their jobs.
  • Cameron Fortner
  • Christian Science Monitor
  • Sept. 18, 2001

27
The Audience
  • These essays, which inspired careful penmanship,
    the pinnacles of eighth grade vocabulary, and
    serious reflection on the meaning of life, were
    being graded by temps who were more invested in
    the magazines theyd brought with them than in
    the essays they were paid to read.
  • Cameron Fortner
  • Christian Science Monitor
  • Sept. 18, 2001

28
The Audience
  • And yet
  • I held the power to affect the lives of
    thousands of kids.
  • Amy Weivoda

29
The Audience
  • Keeping up the paceWeivoda continues
  • If we were going too slowly, the test
    administrator would urge us to burn through the
    remaining tests extra quickly.

30
The Audience
  • 45 seconds to 1 minute
  • Not invested in ideas of student
  • Reads same topic over and over
  • Part-time workers
  • Low pay
  • Temporary Employment

31
The Audience
  • Hillocks calls assembly-line approach to
    scoring
  • Expected rate is sixty compositions per hour
  • If scorer cannot keep up, job is jeopardized

32
The Purpose
  • Artificial Purpose
  • WRITING SITUATION
  • A frequently debated issue is whether or not
    violence in the media including video games,
    movies, songs, etc. has negative effects on young
    adults. Some people believe that there is a need
    for censorship and the elimination of many
    products while others believe it is unnecessary
    to ban potentially violent media and media
    products. Your school newspaper decided to devote
    an upcoming issue to this controversial topic. 
  • You decide to write a letter to the editor of
    your school newspaper expressing your views about
    the effects of violence in the media.
  • WRITING TASK
  • Write a letter to the editor of your school
    newspaper with supporting or opposing whether
    violence in the media has negative effects on
    young adults. Support your position with reasons,
    examples, facts, and/or other evidence. Convince
    your readers to take your position seriously.
    (www.njpep.org)

33
Persuasive Essay
  • WRITING SITUATION
  • The tween generation, kids 8-13, are the newest
    powerhouse in pop culture.  Products are marketed
    and entertainment developed to appeal to this age
    group.  Tweens everywhere watch young girls and
    boys rise to stardom overnight.  There are shows
    promoting instant success, such as American Idol,
    Making the Band, and Star Search.  There are
    young stars that get cast in the role, instead of
    working their way to stardom as more bands, TV
    shows, and movies are put out each year appealing
    to this generation.  As these entertainers are
    put to the test, some are caught lip syncing
    while others fall apart after a brief moment in
    the spotlight.  Is it too easy for tweens to
    become famous?  Are we doing a wrong to both
    tweens and the entertainment industry by allowing
    them to believe in the instant overnight dream of
    success?
  • DIRECTIONS FOR WRITING
  • Since you are a tween and part of the group that
    is directly marketed in the entertainment
    industry, write an editorial for a popular teen
    magazine voicing your opinion on the overnight
    success of tween entertainers.  Do these tweens
    have actual talent?  Are we encouraging a false
    sense of talent or dreams by allowing them all of
    the fame with minimal hard work?  Should various
    television shows and movies be allowed to take
    advantage of the tween superstars?  Back up your
    opinion with details, facts, or anecdotes

34
The Purpose
  • Assess whether curriculum is meeting state
    standard
  • Assess whether schools are performing adequately

35
The Purpose
  • Proficient or Advanced Proficient
  • High School Diploma

36
The Audience
  • Content and style must be appropriate to audience
    and purpose.
  • Mike Sharples
  • How We Write

37
An idea has its own form.
  • According to Dartmouth Colleges Composition
    Center Tutoring Training
  • Allowing an idea to find its own form takes time,
    trial and error, diligence, and patience.
  • While the idea for a paper can come in a flash,
    finding the actual form that the idea will take
    on the page can require hours or even days.

38
An idea has its own form.
  • Practice what I teach?
  • And the elephant No need to tiptoe around Dec.
    25. Philadelphia Inquirer, December, 2006
  • Odd reactions to a fifth child. Chicago
    Tribune, November 18, 2006.
  • Schools are banning tag. Whats next Musical
    Chairs? Christian Science Monitor, November 20,
    2006.
  • Hey, doll, you need a real man. Los Angeles
    Times, February 20, 2006.

39
Time is (not) on their side.
  • Some people will spend almost all their time and
    energy on the beginning of a pieceleaving no
    time for the middle or the end.
  • Managing time is essential to the writers
    control.
  • Sanford Kaye
  • Writing Under Pressure

40
Danger, danger
  • Five Paragraph format
  • Is artificial
  • Depends upon a categorical scheme of organization
    that simply divides any topic into three sections
  • Stifles writing process because
  • Pre-determined structure discourages techniques
    of arrangement
  • Does nothing to foster thought
  • Can hinder further development of writer

41
Danger, danger
  • Therefore, it must be treated as only one genre
    among many. Like the memo, or corporate report,
    or etc.

42
Persuasive Essay
  • Even when writing to a formulaic genre, a writer
    must make many decisions, of content, phrasing,
    variation of style, and, in fiction, character,
    setting, and development of plot.
  • Mike Sharples
  • How We Write

43
Persuasive Essay
  • Thinking within a conceptual space eases the
    task of writing by restricting the search through
    long-term memory for appropriate language to
    express each idea.
  • Mike Sharples
  • How We Write

44
Do we need yet another genre?
  • No research
  • Artificial prompts
  • Contrived purpose
  • Limited time
  • Limited space
  • Disaffected audience

45
Do we need yet another genre?
  • Do we allow the requirements of the test to
    determine ourcurriculum or do we demonstrate the
    differences between the two and teachfor a test
    as a separate process and skill?
  • Dr. Frank Serafini
  • Assistant Professor of Literacy Education
  • University Nevada Las Vegas

46
Persuasive Essay
  • Critical thinking skills
  • Literary elements such as tone, voice, persona,
    point of view, characterization
  • Logical Reasoning
  • Teach format as strategy
  • When is strategy best used
  • Teach various strategies

47
(No Transcript)
48
(No Transcript)
49
Persuasive essay
  • Do you like this picture?
  • Is this a good picture?
  • What makes it a good picture?
  • Would you hang this picture in your living room?
  • Defend your response.

50
Persuasive Essay
  • WRITING SITUATION
  • A frequently debated issue is whether or not
    violence in the media including video games,
    movies, songs, etc. has negative effects on young
    adults. Some people believe that there is a need
    for censorship and the elimination of many
    products while others believe it is unnecessary
    to ban potentially violent media and media
    products. Your school newspaper decided to devote
    an upcoming issue to this controversial topic. 
  • You decide to write a letter to the editor of
    your school newspaper expressing your views about
    the effects of violence in the media.
  • WRITING TASK
  • Write a letter to the editor of your school
    newspaper supporting or opposing whether violence
    in the media has negative effects on young
    adults. Support your position with reasons,
    examples, facts, and/or other evidence. Convince
    your readers to take your position seriously.
    (www.njpep.org) NJ HSPA

51
Persuasive Essay
  • Persona and voice
  • Freewriting journal entry
  • Rewrite as if you were a stuffy college professor
  • Write as an innocent child
  • Choose a famous person. Write as if you were he
    or she
  • Mono-syllabic
  • Use as much slang as possible

52
How did we get here?
  • When we teach this reductive process formulaic
    essay writing, we are telling students that each
    writing task, each writing problem, is
    essentially the same.
  • Mark Wiley
  • The Popularity of Formulaic Writing (and why we
    need to resist). English Journal, Sept., 2000.

53
Narrative Picture Prompts Genre, Too?
  • Time limitations
  • Space limitations
  • Experience limitations
  • Knowing what everything is in the picture.
  • Cultural and Ethnic biases

54
Narrative Picture Prompts
  • Some expository writing
  • Abrupt movements in narrative will prompt lower
    score seem to focus on grammar
  • Smooth stories higher score overlook errors
  • Imaginative stories
  • Conflict
  • Resolution
  • Event driven

55
Narrative Picture Prompts
  • Four Basic Events
  • Character/Setting
  • Introduce problem
  • Develop/work through problem
  • Resolve problem
  • Three approaches
  • Memory/Experience
  • Video
  • Character/Problem/Resolution

56
Narrative Picture Prompts
  • Visual students
  • Use of video to show understanding of a basic
    narrative structure.
  • Music videos tell story.

57
Narrative Picture Prompts
  • Show video
  • Choose still from middle of video
  • Have students write out the story of the video
  • Show picture
  • Create story

58
(No Transcript)
59
Narrative Picture Prompts
  • Who are the characters
  • Names
  • Personality traits
  • Where and when
  • Relationship between two
  • Problem today
  • What does each character want from the other
  • Urgency
  • Resolution

60
Narrative Picture Prompts
WRITING TASKAn ancient proverb says, "A picture
is worth a thousand words."  Regardless of the
photographer/artist's original intent, what we
see in the picture can be very different from
what others see.  What words would you use to
describe what is happening in this picture?  Use
your imagination and experience to speculate what
the story is about or to describe what is
happening. (www.njpep.org)
61
Every Picture Tells a Story, Dont It?
  • Who are the characters
  • Names
  • Personality traits
  • Where and when
  • Relationship between two
  • Problem today
  • What does each character want from the other
  • Urgency
  • Resolution

62
Thoughtshots
  • Writers have a magic camera that they can point
    at the world and create snapshots that contain
    smells and sounds as well as colors and light.
  • Barry Lane. After the End Teaching and
    Learning Creative Revision

63
Thoughtshots
  • A Thoughtshot is a reflection on a particular
    detail or event. It is speculation on why
    someone acted a certain way, what she was
    thinking, what she was feeling.

64
Thoughtshots
  • My mother always sat down in front of the
    television after dinner.

65
Thoughtshots
  • I dont know why my mother always sat down in
    front of the television after dinner. Perhaps it
    was the only time she really had for herself. My
    sister and I always had to do the dishes. My
    step-father usually went out to the garage to
    work on the old Buick that he always thought he
    could get up and running someday. Maybe Mom just
    liked being alone with her game show. She always
    watched Jeopardy with Alex Terbeck. I think she
    thought Alex was handsome and smart. Maybe she
    dreaded that Alex would come into our living room
    one day and swoop her off to game show land. Mom
    knew a lot of the answers on Jeopardy, and shed
    call them out to the television as if those
    contestants could hear her. Who is China!
    shed yell. Id always thought it was sort of
    dumb, and I remember on time my best friend
    Angela was over at my house. She heard my mother
    and looked at me like I was weird.
  • http//shs.westport.k12.ct.us/jwb/Collab/narra
    tives/thoughtshots.htm

66
Thoughtshots
  • Thoughtshots let the writer go deeper into his
    own mind as well as deeper into the mind of
    someone who he is writing about.
  • Help make an experience that may seem
    insignificant to student writer more valuable to
    her writing.
  • Can help take the situation into the story.

67
Open-ended
  • If a kid is good at explaining what theyve
    done, even if what theyve done is incorrect,
    then he has done well.
  • Jo Davidson, Scoring Manager
  • Measurement Incorporated
  • source Washington Post article
  • Feb. 24, 2002

68
Whos this genre for?
  • High achievers will be high achievers
  • Middle to lower achievers will benefit most from
    the genre of standardized writing
  • Other genres of writing must not be neglected

69
Iron Maiden in the Polka Rack?
  • I dont want you to feel restricted by that iron
    maiden, the voiceless and antiseptic five
    paragraph essay. I want you to writethrough
    your own voice.
  • Dudley Barlow to his students
  • I love the five paragraph essay. Thats what I
    know how to do.
  • Students to Dudley Barlow

70
Iron Maiden in the Polka Rack?
  • Two forms of torture?
  • Highly structured and/or restricted writing need
    not be an iron maiden when viewed as one genre
    among many cross curricular genres taught.
  • Students writing wont be misplaced at college.

71
Iron Maiden in the Polka RackThe Genre of
Standardized Writing
  • Thank You
About PowerShow.com