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School Mental Health Three Years After the New Freedom Commission Report:Ohios Experience and Lesson

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Terre Garner, Ohio Federation for Children's Mental Health (Cincinnati) ... Jennifer Miller, Ohio Department of Education (Columbus) ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: School Mental Health Three Years After the New Freedom Commission Report:Ohios Experience and Lesson


1
School Mental Health Three Years After the New
Freedom Commission ReportOhios Experience and
Lessons Learned
Carl E. Paternite Center for School-Based Mental
Health Programs Department of Psychology Miami
University (Ohio) paternce_at_muohio.edu http//www.u
nits.muohio.edu/csbmhp/
NAMI 2006 Annual Conference Washington, DC June
30, 2006
2
Key Current and Past Mental Health-Schools-Familie
s Shared Agenda Partners in Ohio
Ellen Abraham, Lakewood City Schools
(Lakewood) Mike Armstrong, Ohio Department of
Education (Columbus) Dawn Anderson Butcher,
College of Social Work (Ohio State U.,
Columbus) Noelle Duvall, Childrens Resource
Center (Bowling Green) Stephanie Falor, Ohio
Department of Education (Columbus) Paul
Flaspohler, Center for School-Based Mental Health
Programs (Miami U., Oxford) Terre Garner, Ohio
Federation for Childrens Mental Health
(Cincinnati) Diana Leigh, Center for Learning
Excellence (Ohio State U., Columbus) Paul Lilley,
Alcohol, Drug Addiction, and MH Services Board of
Hancock Co. (Findlay) Linda Maxwell, Childrens
Hospital (Columbus) Sue Mikolic, National
Alliance for the Mentally Ill of Ohio
(Eastlake) Jennifer Miller, Ohio Department of
Education (Columbus) Kathy Oberlin, Heartland
Behavioral Health (Cuyahoga Falls) Julie Owens,
Department of Psychology (Ohio U., Athens) Kay
Rietz, Ohio Department of Mental Health
(Columbus) Mary Lou Rush, Ohio Department of
Education (Columbus) Dave Tener, Woodland Centers
(Gallipolis) Jennifer Vargo, Center for Learning
Excellence (Ohio State U., Columbus) Amy Wilms,
Center for School-Based Mental Health Programs
(Miami U., Oxford) Joe Zins, CASEL and University
of Cincinnati (Cincinnati)
AND MANY OTHERS
3
Accountability to…
4
Being Accountable to Students (Families) and
Teachers By Ensuring Effective School Mental
Health (SMH) Services Experiences of three
students Kristin, Tova, and Rachel
5
Accountability Questions
  • What are the strengths of how Tova was served
    by her school?
  • What are the weaknesses of how Tova was served
    by her school?
  • In an ideal world, and in a school that is
    committed to getting the conditions right, how
    should students like Tova be served?
  • What are the barriers (obstacles) to more
    effectively serving students like Tova?
  • How would Tova be served in your school?

6
Accountability Questions
  • What are the strengths of how Kristins brother
    George was served by his school?
  • What are the weaknesses of how George was
    served by his school?
  • In an ideal world, and in a school that is
    committed to getting the conditions right, how
    should George have been served?
  • What are the barriers (obstacles) to more
    effectively serving students like George?
  • How would George have been served in your school?

7
Accountability Questions
  • What are the strengths of how Rachel was served
    by her school?
  • What are the weaknesses of how Rachel was
    served by her school?
  • In an ideal world, and in a school that is
    committed to getting the conditions right, how
    should students like Rachel be served?
  • What are the barriers (obstacles) to more
    effectively serving students like Rachel?
  • How would Rachel be served in your school?

8
Ohio Mental Health Network for School Success
  • Since 2001
  • Ohio Department of Mental Health
  • Ohio Department of Education
  • Center for School-Based Mental
  • Health Programs at Miami University
  • (http//www.units.muohio.edu/csbmhp)

Mission To help Ohios school districts,
community-based agencies, and families work
together to achieve improved educational and
developmental outcomes for all children
especially those at emotional or behavioral risk
and those with mental health problems.
9
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11
Key Supplementary Funding
  • Shared Agenda seed grants (2002, 2005) from
  • IDEA Partnership
  • Numerous additional State/regional
  • organizations

12
Guiding Principles for a Mental Health, Schools,
Families Shared Agenda
  • Mental health is crucial to school success
  • There are shared opportunities for mental health,
    schools, students and families to work together
    more effectively

13
The Ohio Mental Health Network for School Success
  • Overarching Agenda
  • Build and sustain a community of practice to
    create and foster demand for expanded, effective
    school mental health programs and services
  • Create/foster demand at all levelslocal,
    regional, state, and national

14
The Ohio Mental Health Network for School Success
  • Specific Action Agenda
  • Create awareness of needs and gaps in resources
    address stigma
  • Gather data on needs, resources,and promising
    practices
  • Partner with six action networks for regional and
    statewide efforts (e.g., training institutes,
    workshops, action research, etc.)
  • Train and provide technical assistance to support
    adoption of evidence-based and promising
    practices
  • Promote educationmental healthfamily
    collaboration
  • Identify financial resources for school mental
    health initiatives
  • Promote inter-professional strategies and
    practices in university-based professional
    preparation programs (education, psychology,
    counseling, social work, public health, child
    psychiatry, nursing…)

15
Integrated Systems to Support the Development of
All Children
  • Systems of
    Prevention and Promotion

  • All Students (universal)
  • Systems of Early Intervention
  • Students At-Risk (selected)

From work of Joe Zins
16
Ohios Mental Health, Schools, and Families
Shared Agenda Initiative http//www.units.muohio.e
du/csbmhp/sharedagenda.html
Phase 1 Statewide forum for leaders of mental
health, education, and family policymaking
organizations and child-serving systems
(March 3, 2003) Phase 2 Six regional forums
for policy implementers and consumer
stakeholders (April-May, 2003) Phase 3
Legislative forum involving key leadership of
relevant house and senate committees (October
9, 2003) Phase 4 Development and release of
Shared Agenda report Phase 5 Ongoing
policy/funding advocacy and technical assistance
to promote attention to the crucial links
between mental health and school success
17
Legislative Forum On Mental Health and School
Success Creating A Shared Agenda In Ohio October
9, 2003
18
Legislative Forum On Mental Health and School
Success Creating A Shared Agenda In Ohio October
9, 2003
19
Phase 4 of Ohios Shared Agenda Initiative
  • ODMH/ODE-sponsored ad hoc workgroup to develop
    Shared Agenda report addressing
  • Public Awareness and Advocacy
  • Professional Development/Training and Service
    Delivery
  • Policy and Funding
  • Workgroup met three times between 11/03-3/04
  • Final report released August 2004
    (http//www.units.muohio.edu/csbmhp/sharedagenda/r
    esources.html)

20
Ohios Mental Health, Schools, and Families
Shared Agenda Initiative http//www.units.muohio.e
du/csbmhp/sharedagenda.html
Phase 5 Ongoing policy/funding advocacy and
technical assistance to promote attention to the
crucial links between mental health and school
success and to effective SMH practices.
21
Phase 5 An Immediate Legislative Outcome
Senate Bill 2 Section 3319.61(E) (effective June
9, 2004) The standards for educator
professional development developed under division
(A) (3) of this section shall include standards
that address the crucial link between academic
achievement and mental health issues.
22
Follow-up Advocacy and Technical Assistance
Efforts with
  • Educator Standards Board
  • Numerous additional State/regional
  • organizations and initiatives

23
Mental Health Issues and the No Child Left Behind
Mandate Two Important Interrelated Goals
Achievement and Wellbeing
  • 1) Achievement promotes wellbeing
  • 2) Wellbeing promotes achievement
  • School philosophy often acknowledges 1 but
  • fails to sufficiently acknowledge 2

24
In Addition to Parents, Teachers are On the
Mental Health Front Line
  • Yet, teachers/educators are very poorly trained
    in problem recognition and mental health
    promotion
  • Significant need to enhance teacher/educator
    training based on analysis of issues confronted
    in the classroom/school

25
What Teachers/Educators Need
  • Basic Current Knowledge About
  • Role of stress in students lives and impacts on
    learning
  • Signs and symptoms of mental illness diagnoses
    (e.g., depression, ADHD, anxiety disorders,
    conduct disorders…)
  • Risk factors and warning signs for suicide
  • Protective factors that promote resilience in
    students
  • Effective, culturally-informed treatments and
    supports for students with mental health problems
  • Medications and effects (intended and side
    effects) on learning and behavior
  • How to access community support and referral
  • Impacts of stigma

26
What Teachers/Educators Need
  • Effective Strategies and Skills for
  • Promoting mental health (well-being) and academic
    achievement through instructional techniques and
    curriculum
  • Creating a positive classroom climate that offers
    a healthy learning environment and promotes
    academic, social, and emotional development for
    all students
  • Creating a positive, inclusive and safe school
    culture and climate
  • Working with students displaying typical
    emotional and behavior problems
  • Interacting with parents in empowering and
    affirming ways
  • Listening to students

27
Phase 5 Mental Health and School Success Ongoing
Efforts in Ohio
  • Linkage and consultation related to work of
  • Mental HealthEducation Integration Consortium
  • (MHEDIC)
  • Bringing to together national experts and
    Ohio-based
  • university faculty and practitioners in education
    and mental
  • health fields to address
  • pre-service workforce preparation issues
  • development of effective in-service training
    curricula and strategies

28
Phase 5 Getting the Conditions Right to Promote
Student Well-being and Academic Success
Collaboration with Ohio Department of Education,
Ohio State University, and Miami University to
develop and pilot test the Ohio Community
Collaboration Model for School Improvement
29
Academic Outcomes
Getting the Conditions Right!!!!
ODEs new and expanded conceptualization of
school improvement...
30
Phase 5 Networks New SAMHSA-funded Initiative
School Mental Health Effective Practice
Integration Council (EPIC)
31
Bridging the Gap between Research and Practice
Community Science (Wandersman, 2003)
  • explicit attention is to the mechanisms/processes
    needed to develop, support, and sustain effective
    practices in real world settings
  • An interdisciplinary framework for strengthening
    communities by improving the quality of practice
    in treatment, prevention, health promotion, and
    education

32
From Research to Best Practices Bridging the
Gap (Green, Wandersman, Flaspohler, and others)
  • Best Practice as Process rather than magic
    bullet programs
  • Attention to local needs
  • Control by practitioner, client, or community
  • Local evaluation and self-monitoring
  • Research in the tailoring process and new
    technology
  • Consumer driven Synthesis and Translation

33
Effective Practice Expert (EPE) Actions in
University-Community (U-C) Partnerships
34
EPIC Products
  • Synthesized and Translated
  • Content
  • Tools
  • Processes

35
The Ten EPEs
  • Case Western Reserve University
  • Ohio State University
  • Kent State University
  • Miami University
  • Ohio University

Their Disciplines Clinical Psychology Community
Psychology Criminal Justice Public Health
Social Work Teacher Education
36
EPIC Values and Principles
  • EPIC is focused on strengthening the application
    of existing knowledge.
  • The overall aim of EPIC is to support high
    quality, interdisciplinary, collaborative
    synthesis and translation within and across all
    fields related to expanded school mental health.
  • EPIC must have an interdisciplinary perspective.
  • EPIC must have an agenda that prioritizes process
    over program.
  • EPIC is about supporting the common good.
  • The tools and products of EPIC will be produced
    for the public domain.
  • EPIC should be self-sustaining.

37
Hopes for EPIC Initiative
  • EPIC tools and content papers will provide
    information useful in
  • producing beneficial outcomes for youth and
    families.
  • Tools and processes will be accessible and useful
    to the range of stakeholders engaged in the
    process of planning, implementing, evaluating,
    sustaining, and continuously improving services
    related to SMH.
  • EPEs will increase readiness and capacity to
    implement services promoting SMH at the county,
    district, and/or building level.
  • University-Community partnerships will contribute
    to the sustainable promotion of services in SMH.

38
Phase 5 Connecting the Dots
We need ongoing advocacy and vigilance to gain
and keep seats at the table, to overcome the
power of silos and to promote and sustain state
and local commitment to positive change - CEP
39
As Yogi Berra supposedly said,
"In theory there is no difference between theory
and practice, but in practice there is."
40
Connecting the Dots
  • Access to Better Care (ABC) School-Community
    Partnership Initiative (state, MH/ED)
  • Effective Practice Integration Council (federal,
    MH)
  • Eliminating Barriers Initiative (federal, MH)
  • Integration of Schools and Mental Health Systems
    (federal/state, ED)
  • Ohio Integrated Systems Model for Academic
    Behavior Supports PBIS (federal/state, ED)
  • Ohios Community Collaboration Model for School
    Improvement (state, ED)
  • Shared Agenda Initiative (state/federal, ED/MH
  • Transformation State Incentive Grant (federal,
    MH)
  • 21st Century Community Learning Centers
    (federal/state, ED)

41
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request paternce_at_muohio.edu
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