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1
Creating WOW! Services for Millennials sweeney_at_nji
t.edu Richard Sweeney
973-596-3208
Powerpoint available at http//www.library.njit.
edu/staff-folders/sweeney/

2
(No Transcript)
3
Richard T Sweeney
  • University Librarian
  • New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark,
    NJ
  • Polytechnic University, Brooklyn, NY
  • Director
  • Columbus Metropolitan Library - Columbus, OH
  • Director of Public Library - Genesee County,
    Flint, MI
  • Director of Public Library - Atlantic City ,
    NJ
  • School Librarian - Atlantic City, NJ

4
Theyre variously called the Internet
Generation, Echo Boomers, the Boomlet, Nexters,
Generation Y, the Nintendo Generation, the
Digital Generation, and, in Canada, the Sunshine
Generation. But several thousand of them sent
suggestions about what they want to be called to
Peter Jennings at abcnews.com, and Millennials
was the clear winner.
http//www.generationsatwork.com/articles/millenia
ls.htm Claire Raines Associates Managing
Millennials 2002
5
Experts differ on end or beginning date of
generation 1974-1981
6
Todays main question Are Millennials
different from prior generations at the same
age? Future question Will these differences
become part of the Millennial lifelong culture?
7
MILLENNIAL PANELS I have interviewed over 35
Millennial Panels, each made up of 8 to 14
members from local colleges and universities in
California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida,
Kansas, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Minnesota,
Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, Ohio,
Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.
8
..let me just say that an inflection point is a
time in the life of the business when its
fundamentals are about to change. p. 30
The Millennials are that inflection point.
Andrew S. Grove Only the Paranoid Survive How to
Exploit the Crisis Points That Challenge Every
Company and Career. Doubleday, New York 1996
9
MILLENNIAL CHARACTERISTICS
Richard Sweeney
10
EXPECTATIONS FOR TECHNOLOGY FORMAT
AGNOSTIC NOMADIC MULTITASKING
BELIEFS PRINCIPLED ADAPTIVE DIRECT
BEHAVIORS EXPERIENTIAL INTEGRATED COLLABORATIV
E
Abram, Stephen and Judy Luther. Born with the
Chip Library Journal. New York May 1, 2004.
Vol. 129, Iss. 8 p. 34 (4 pages)
11
The baby boomers generally had children later
and in smaller numbers than their prewar
generation parents. But when they did start
reproducing, from about 1970 to 1995, they did so
with a vengeance. The result the growth in the
under-18 population that's already reverberating
in classrooms today. p. 4
Williamson, Christopher. The war of the ages
Planning 68.7 (2002) 4-9
Huge Generation
12
Number of children under 181966 69.9
million1976 65.1 million1986 62.8 million1998
71.4 millionp. 22
Baker, Debra. Move Over Baby Boomers. ABA
Journal, 85 (1999) 22
Huge Generation
13
Huge Generation
14
Those born 1980-1992 entering workforce _at_ 23 yrs
by 2015 (13 years)
Those born 1946-1953 leaving workforce _at_ 62 yrs
by 2015 (8 years)
Huge Generation
15
About a fifth of these echo boom children are
the offspring of immigrants who arrived in the
U.S. during the 1980s and who often had
relatively large families. The ethnic profile
created by these immigrant children is far
different from the white and black 1950s and
1960s. p. 22
Baker, Debra. Move Over Baby Boomers. ABA
Journal, 85 (1999) 22
Williamson, Christopher. The war of the ages
Planning 68.7 (2002) 4-9
Diverse
16
.. A recent Kaiser Family Foundation report,
"Generation M Media in the Lives of 8- to
18-Year-Olds," found that students who use media
the most also spend more time with family,
friends, and other activities. That may explain
the need to do many things at once. p. 33
McHale, Tom. Portrait of a Digital Native
Technology Learning, 26.2 (2005) 33-34
Media Addicts Multitaskers
17
Contrary to most expectations, it does not
appear that spending time with media takes away
from the time children spend in other pursuits
in fact, it seems that those young people who
spend the most time using media are also those
whose lives are the most full with family,
friends, sports, and other interests. p. 14
Henry J Kaiser Family Foundation Study, Victoria
Rideout, Donald F. Roberts and Ulla G. Foehr.
Generation M Media in the lives of 8-18
year-olds. (2005) http//www.kff.org/entmedia/ent
media030905pkg.cfm
Media Consumers Multitaskers
18
To be sure, some fields are poised to lose large
portions of their work forces because they have
attracted fewer young people in recent years.
p. B1
Greene, Kelly. Bye-Bye Boomers?. Wall Street
Journal - Eastern Edition, 246.57 20 Sep. 2005
B1-B6
Generational Clash
19
Some experts think the impact wont be as stark
as the numbers suggest. Fully 70 to 80 of baby
boomers expect to continue working in later life,
several studies show. p. B1
Greene, Kelly. Bye-Bye Boomers?. Wall Street
Journal - Eastern Edition, 246.57 20 Sep. 2005
B1-B6
Generational Clash
20
These two Boomers Gen Y (or three) Gen X
generations may exist side by side, but they have
different agendas that will influence planning at
many levels. p. 4
Williamson, Christopher. The war of the ages
Planning 68.7 (2002) 4-9
Generational Clash
21
said Troy Campbell, senior consultant with the
Center for Generational Studies. I truly believe
we cannot isolate one generation in a vacuum
because they all interrelate, Our core
values are formed by the time we are 10 or 12
years old, he added.
Sativa Ross. Generations Apart, Aftermarket
Business, May 2005 www.aftermarketbusiness.com
Generational Clash
22
Creating WOW! Services for Millennials sweeney_at_nji
t.edu Richard Sweeney
973-596-3208
When asked about problems facing their
generation, many millennials respond that the
biggest one is the poor example that adults set
for kids. p. 36
Oblinger, Diana. Understanding the New Student.
Educause Review, 38.3 (2003) 36-42.
Generational Clash
23
It is clear from talking with them that they
already know they dont want to live and work the
way we do. p. 144
OReilly, Brian. Meet the Future. Fortune 142.3
(2000) 144-157.
Generational Clash
24
74 of the students expect to be better off than
their parents in terms of income and quality of
life over their lifetime.
Ernst and Young, Canada. Sixty-five Per Cent of
College Students Think They Will Become
Millionaires. 2001. Press Information Worldwide.
3/14/05. http//www.pressi.com/us/release/35870.ht
ml
Optimistic
25
In a March 2001 Northwestern Mutual poll of
college seniors, 73 percent said they thought it
very likely they would be able to afford the
lifestyle they grew up in and 21 percent said
they thought it was somewhat likely.p.17
American Demographics Ithica, Sep 2001
Optimistic
26
Nothing infuriates us more than busywork,
says 24-year-old Katie Day, an assistant editor
at Berkley Publishing, a division of Penguin
Group USA. Fearlessness ? "I don't have time to
be intimidated," says Anna Stassen, a 26-year-old
copywriter at the advertising agency Fallon
Worldwide who treats her bosses like the guys."
Sacks, Danielle. SCENES from the culture clash.
Fast Company, 102 (2006) 72-77
Impatience
27
Nothing infuriates us more than busywork,
says 24-year-old Katie Day, an assistant editor
at Berkley Publishing, a division of Penguin
Group USA. Fearlessness ? "I don't have time to
be intimidated," says Anna Stassen, a 26-year-old
copywriter at the advertising agency Fallon
Worldwide who treats her bosses like the guys."
Sacks, Danielle. SCENES from the culture clash.
Fast Company, 102 (2006) 72-77
Impatience
28
Busy Around the Clock Millennial teens may be
Americas busiest people. Long gone are the days
of Boomer kids being shooed outside to invent
their own games or of GenXer Kids being left
home alone with a self-care guide." p. 45
Howe, Neil and William Strauss. Millennials Go To
College. Washington, DC American Association of
Collegiate Registrars, 2003.
Impatience
29
50 say having flexibility in planning a career
around major life events is the most important
element for achieving a good balance between a
career and personal life. p. 4
Ernst and Young, Canada. Sixty-five Per Cent of
College Students Think They Will Become
Millionaires. 2001. Press Information Worldwide.
3/14/05. http//www.pressi.com/us/release/35870.ht
ml
Flexibility
30
"When you look at the generation coming up now,
I think the thing that generation will value more
than anything is flexibility," Friedman said.
"People want to have a more balanced life."p.15
Rulison, Larry. Gen Y in search of flexibility.
 Philadelphia Business Journal.  22.31 Sep 19,
(2003). 15
Flexibility
31
We want everything to be easy, and we want it
now," said Katie Smith, a student at the
University of Florida. "We have no patience. p.6
Lillo, Andrea. Young consumers tell it
'straight' Home Textiles Today High Point May
27, 23.38 (2002) 6
High Expectations Direct
32
We have no patience. The Gen Y consumer is
brand-andstore loyal, she said, but the store
must provide choices and have them in stock, or
they will go elsewhere. p. 6
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Lillo, Andrea. Young consumers tell it
'straight' Home Textiles Today High Point May
27, 23.38 (2002) 6
More Choices
33
gravitate toward group activity identify
with parents values and feel close to their
parents
Collaborative
Family Oriented
..believe its cool to be smart
Value Intelligence
Oblinger, Diana. Understanding the New Student.
Educause Review, 38.3 (2003) 36-42.
Collaborative Values
34
Along with differences in attitudes, millennials
exhibit distinct learning styles. For example,
their learning preferences tend toward teamwork,
experiential activities, structure and the use of
technology. Their strengths include
multitasking, goal orientation, positive
attitudes, and a collaborative style.
Oblinger, Diana. Understanding the New Student.
Educause Review, 38.3 (2003) 36-42.
Collaborative Achievement Oriented
35
The real question is Does the behavior of this
new group change the world in any way that really
matters? If youre in business today, the
answer is clearly yes. p. 1
Beck, John C., and Mitchell Wade. Got Game How
the Gamer Generation is Reshaping Business
Forever. Boston Harvard Business School Press,
2004.
Gamers
36
How hard this new cohort works, how they try to
compete, how they fit into teams. How they take
risks all are different in statistically
verifiable ways. And those differences are
driven by one central factor growing up with
video games. p. 2
Beck, John C., and Mitchell Wade. Got Game How
the Gamer Generation is Reshaping Business
Forever. Boston Harvard Business School Press,
2004.
Gamers
37
The important thing for business professionals
to know about games isnt whether someone plays
them now, but whether he or she grew up playing
them. p. 25
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Beck, John C., and Mitchell Wade. Got Game How
the Gamer Generation is Reshaping Business
Forever. Boston Harvard Business School Press,
2004.
Gamers
38
The most important things to remember are
multi-player, creative, challenging, and
competitive. -a high school student p. 1
Prensky, Marc. Use Their Tools! Speak Their
Language! Marc Prensky. March 2004.
http//www.marcprensky.com/writing/Prensky-Use_The
ir_Tools_Speak_Their_Language.pdf
Gamers
39
We know from contemporary neurobiology that
experiences of this intensity alter the brains of
those who receive them in ways that enable them
to accommodate and deal with these experiences
more easily. p. 3
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Prensky, Marc. Use Their Tools! Speak Their
Language! Marc Prensky. March 2004.
http//www.marcprensky.com/writing/Prensky-Use_The
ir_Tools_Speak_Their_Language.pdf
Gamers
40
So we now have a generation of students that is
better at taking in information and making
decisions quickly, better at MULTITASKING and
PARALLEL PROCESSING a generation that THINKS
GRAPHICALLY rather than textually, assumes
connectivity, and is accustomed to seeing the
world through a lens of games and play. p. 3
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Prensky, Marc. Use Their Tools! Speak Their
Language! Marc Prensky. March 2004.
http//www.marcprensky.com/writing/Prensky-Use_The
ir_Tools_Speak_Their_Language.pdf
Gamers
41
And we will never understand or use the
technology in precisely the same way as the
Natives do. This distinction is critical in
education, because we are currently in a time
where all our students are DIGITAL NATIVES, yet
the bulk of our educators, teachers,
administrators and curriculum developers are
Digital Immigrants. p. 3
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Prensky, Marc. Use Their Tools! Speak Their
Language! Marc Prensky. March 2004.
http//www.marcprensky.com/writing/Prensky-Use_The
ir_Tools_Speak_Their_Language.pdf
Digital Natives
42
Creating WOW! Services for Millennials sweeney_at_nji
t.edu Richard Sweeney
973-596-3208
p.X
Even if the lecturer is charismatic, holding the
attention of several hundred students for an
entire lecture of fifty minutes or longer is
impossible. p.15
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Foreman, Joel. Next-Generation Educational
Technology Versus the Lecture. Educause Review.
38.4 (2003) 12-22
Experiential
43
Creating WOW! Services for Millennials sweeney_at_nji
t.edu Richard Sweeney
973-596-3208
The ideal learning situation 1customized to
the very specific needs of the individual. 2provi
des students with immediate feedback. 3...is
constructive ..to explore learning environments
(preferably multi sensorial)... 4motivates
students to persist far in excess of any
externally imposed requirements. 5builds
enduring conceptual structures. p.14
p.X
Experiential
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Foreman, Joel. Next-Generation Educational
Technology Versus the Lecture. Educause Review.
38.4 (2003) 12-22
Experiential
44
Creating WOW! Services for Millennials sweeney_at_nji
t.edu Richard Sweeney
973-596-3208
We are a generation of learners by exploration.
My first Web site, for example, was constructed
before I had any concept of HTML or Java. I
simply experimented with the commands until the
pieces fit together. Note this article
published by a Millennial
p.X
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Windam, Carrie Father Google and Mother IM
Confessions of a Net Gen Learner. EDUCAUSE
Review, 40.5 (2005) 4259.
Experiential
45
One Tape Recorder Talking to Another Foreman
What is wrong with the current instructional
model? p.50
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Foreman, Joel. Next-Generation Educational
Technology Versus the Lecture.
Foreman, Joel. Game-Based Learning How to
Delight and Instruct in the 21st Century.
Educause Review, 39.5 (2004) 5066.
Gamers
46
Gee It is amazing to me that in the modern age,
when we have technologies like the Internet and
the hand-helds and the computers and the computer
games, we are still teaching inside four walls,
where all the information is coming from within
those walls and where all students, regardless of
the amount of preparation they have, are sitting
together. p.50 James Paul Gee Tashia Morgridge
Professor of Reading at the University of
WisconsinMadison.
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Foreman, Joel. Next-Generation Educational
Technology Versus the Lecture.
Foreman, Joel. Game-Based Learning How to
Delight and Instruct in the 21st Century.
Educause Review, 39.5 (2004) 5066.
Gamers
47
Creating WOW! Services for Millennials sweeney_at_nji
t.edu Richard Sweeney
973-596-3208
The average college class has minimal
interaction estimates are that students ask 0.1
question per hour and that faculty ask 0.3. By
contrast, students in tutored sessions ask 20-30
questions, and tutors ask more than 100. In
computer based instruction, the number of
questions posed to students per hour ranges from
160 to 800. p. 70 Diana Oblinger VP,
Educause
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Foreman, Joel. Next-Generation Educational
Technology Versus the Lecture.
Diana G. Oblinger, Learners, Learning and
Technology, Educause Review 40.5
September/October 2005 66-75
Interactivity Feedback
48
35 or the largest portion of those who IM for
about an hour are Gen Y-ers. In contrast, the
greatest percentage of instant messengers who IM
for less than 15 minutes consist of Trailing
Boomers (26). p.iii
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Foreman, Joel. Next-Generation Educational
Technology Versus the Lecture.
Shiu, Eulynn and Amanda Lenhart. How Americans
use instant messaging. Pew Internet and
American Life Project 9/1/2004 http//www.pewinte
rnet.org/PPF/r/133/report_display.asp
Gamers
Digital Natives
49
Within the instant messaging Gen Y (18-27 years)
age group, 46 report using IM more frequently
than email. p. iii
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Foreman, Joel. Next-Generation Educational
Technology Versus the Lecture.
Shiu, Eulynn and Amanda Lenhart. How Americans
use instant messaging. Pew Internet and
American Life Project 9/1/2004 http//www.pewinte
rnet.org/PPF/r/133/report_display.asp
Digital Natives
50
Internet users ages 12-28 are more likely to IM,
play online games, and create blogs. Internet
users over age 28 (but younger than 70) are more
likely to make travel reservations and bank
online. p. 1
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Foreman, Joel. Next-Generation Educational
Technology Versus the Lecture.
Shiu, Eulynn and Amanda Lenhart. How Americans
use instant messaging. Pew Internet and
American Life Project 9/1/2004 http//www.pewinte
rnet.org/PPF/r/133/report_display.asp
Digital Natives
51
Internet users ages 12 to 28 years old have
embraced the online applications that enable
communicative, creative, and social uses. Teens
and Generation Y (age 18-28) are significantly
more likely than older users to send and receive
instant messages, play online games, create
blogs, download music, and search for school
information. p. 2
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Foreman, Joel. Next-Generation Educational
Technology Versus the Lecture.
Fox, Susannah and Mary Madden. Generations
online. Pew Internet and American Life Project
Dec. 2005 http//www.pewinternet.org/pdfs/PIP_Gene
rations_Memo.pdf
Digital Natives
52
IM-ers are multi-taskers. 32 of IM users say
they do other things on their computer such as
browsing the web or playing games virtually every
time they are instant messaging and another 29
are doing something else some of the time they
are IM-ing. p. iv
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Foreman, Joel. Next-Generation Educational
Technology Versus the Lecture.
Shiu, Eulynn and Amanda Lenhart. How Americans
use instant messaging. Pew Internet and
American Life Project 9/1/2004 http//www.pewinte
rnet.org/PPF/r/133/report_display.asp
Multitaskers
53
"It's the way we've all come to be raised," says
Fear, a senior at Hunterdon Central Regional High
School in Flemington, New Jersey. She is a member
of the National Honor Society, student leader of
the local Amnesty International chapter, and
president of the school's International Thespian
Society. "There's a lot of work we're expected to
do. You have to multitask to get everything done.

McHale, Tom. Portrait of a Digital Native
Technology Learning, 26.2 (2005) 33-34
Multitaskers
54
New research also suggests that brains can be
trained to multitask. A study conducted by Monica
Luciana, associate professor of psychology at the
University of Minnesota (published in Child
Development, May/June 2005) found the brain's
ability to effectively self-organize competing
information remains in the developmental process
until 16 or 17 years of age.
McHale, Tom. Portrait of a Digital Native
Technology Learning, 26.2 (2005) 33-34
Multitaskers
55
Most Americans take a dim view of the younger
generation, report Neil Howe and William Strauss
in their new book, "Millennials Go to
College."Only 16 percent of adult Americans
believe that people under the age of 30 share
most of their moral and ethical values. p.B8
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Foreman, Joel. Next-Generation Educational
Technology Versus the Lecture.
Kleinfeld, Judith. Millennials our next great
generation, Anchorage Daily News
(Alaska), January 30, 2004 Friday, FINAL
EDITION, ALASKA Pg. B8, 712 words,
Values
56
They could not be more wrong. The Millennial
Generation, who turned 18 around the year 2000,
show the smallest gap with the values of older
generations than any teens have shown since the
history of polling. p.B8
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Foreman, Joel. Next-Generation Educational
Technology Versus the Lecture.
Kleinfeld, Judith. Millennials our next great
generation, Anchorage Daily News
(Alaska), January 30, 2004 Friday, FINAL
EDITION, ALASKA Pg. B8, 712 words,
Values
57
Creating WOW! Services for Millennials sweeney_at_nji
t.edu Richard Sweeney
973-596-3208
Turnout increased among other age groups, too,
leaving young voters with roughly the same
proportion of the total electorate nationally as
in 2000.
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Foreman, Joel. Next-Generation Educational
Technology Versus the Lecture.
http//www.usatoday.com/news/politicselections/ 20
04-11-08-under30_x.htm
More Liberal
58
Creating WOW! Services for Millennials sweeney_at_nji
t.edu Richard Sweeney
973-596-3208
This time, young voters were the only group that
favored Democrat Kerry. The AP's exit polls found
that under-30s favored Kerry over Bush, 55 to
44, compared to a 48-46 edge for Al Gore in
2000.
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Foreman, Joel. Next-Generation Educational
Technology Versus the Lecture.
http//www.usatoday.com/news/politicselections/ 20
04-11-08-under30_x.htm
More Liberal
59
Creating WOW! Services for Millennials sweeney_at_nji
t.edu Richard Sweeney
973-596-3208
Some 30 of freshmen say they're liberals,
compared with 21 in 1981. Popularity of the
"liberal" label has increased for five
consecutive years, Sax says. About 49 now are
"middle-of-the-road" and 21 "conservative" or
"far right.
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Foreman, Joel. Next-Generation Educational
Technology Versus the Lecture.
Elias, Marilyn. Boomer echo College freshmen
look liberal USA TODAY January 28, 2002, Monday,
FINAL EDITION
More Liberal
60
Creating WOW! Services for Millennials sweeney_at_nji
t.edu Richard Sweeney
973-596-3208
They believe passionately that merit rather than
length of service should drive promotion,
progression and the acquisition of
responsibility. They argue their baby boomer
managers should acknowledge their demonstration
of competence more fulsomely. p.17
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Foreman, Joel. Next-Generation Educational
Technology Versus the Lecture.
Hutton, Will. Wear Kid Gloves When Tackling
Generation Y. Personnel Today (2003) 17.
Achievement Oriented
61
Creating WOW! Services for Millennials sweeney_at_nji
t.edu Richard Sweeney
973-596-3208
Over the past 20 years, young adults (18-34)
have declined from being those most likely to
read literature to those least likely (with the
exception of those 65 and older. The rate of
decline for the youngest adults, aged 18 to 24
was 55 percent greater than the total adult
population.
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Foreman, Joel. Next-Generation Educational
Technology Versus the Lecture.
Hill, Kelly. Reading at Risk A Survey of
Literary Reading in America National Endowment
for the Arts Research Division Report, 46 (June
2004)
Reading Less
62
Creating WOW! Services for Millennials sweeney_at_nji
t.edu Richard Sweeney
973-596-3208
In short, the future of the U.S. News industry
is seriously threatened by the seemingly
irrevocable move by young people away from
traditional sources of news.
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Foreman, Joel. Next-Generation Educational
Technology Versus the Lecture.
Merrril Brown, Abandoning the News. Carnegie
Reporter 3.2 (Spring 2005)
Reading Less
63
Creating WOW! Services for Millennials sweeney_at_nji
t.edu Richard Sweeney
973-596-3208
Main Purposes of the Library By Age of U.S.
Respondent U.S. U.S. 18-24 25-64 In
formation 49 56 Books 32
26 Research 20 15
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Foreman, Joel. Next-Generation Educational
Technology Versus the Lecture.
De Rosa, Cathy et. al. Perceptions Of Libraries
and Information Resources A report to the OCLC
membership. Dublin, OH OCLC Online Computer
Library Center, Inc. 2005
Libraries ? Information
64
Creating WOW! Services for Millennials sweeney_at_nji
t.edu Richard Sweeney
973-596-3208
In that light, it is hard to imagine a more
producer-push approach than the sage on the
stage lecture model that dominates undergraduate
education. Can higher education move the
curriculum in ways that take advantage of demand
pull, and will colleges and universities design
their infrastructures to support that approach?
p. 60 James Hilton, University of Michigan
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Foreman, Joel. Next-Generation Educational
Technology Versus the Lecture.
James Hilton, The Future for Higher Education
Sunrise or Perfect Storm? Educause Review 41.2
March/April 2006 59-71
Pull vs. Push
65
Creating WOW! Services for Millennials sweeney_at_nji
t.edu Richard Sweeney
973-596-3208
  • Learning Strategies for Millennials
  • Increase teacher student interaction feedback
  • Engage students (motivation involvement)
  • Accelerate student learning
  • Increase experiential learning (gaming
    simulations, role playing)
  • Increase learning options
  • Increase peer-to-peer (collaboration) learning
  • Offer more pull web based learning options
  • Offer more interactive multimedia learning.

Millennial Learning Strategies
66
Creating WOW! Services for Millennials sweeney_at_nji
t.edu Richard Sweeney
973-596-3208
  • Examples
  • Managing the Digital Enterprise (Rappa-North
    Carolina State)
  • Solar System Collaboratory (Colorado)
  • Virtual chemistry experiments (Davidson)
  • U.S. History Videos (History Channel)
  • BoilerCast (Purdue - podcasts, vcasts)
  • Game Based Learning Sites (Marc Prensky)
  • Math Emporium (Virginia Tech)
  • Building bridges (Civil Engineering-Nova)
  • Physics Tutorial Modules Andersen Center (RPI)
  • Collaborative Learning Table (RPI)
  • Immediate stock market quotes (Yahoo Finance)
  • SearchPath information literacy tutorial
    (Rutgers)

Examples
67
MILLENNIAL CHARACTERISTICS
Richard Sweeney
68
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