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YOUTH SUICIDE PREVENTION

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Suicide outnumbered homicides (20,308) by 3 to 2. ... Suicide by firearms was most common method for men and women; 52% of all ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: YOUTH SUICIDE PREVENTION


1
YOUTH SUICIDE PREVENTION
  • Gayle P. Lofgren, LMSW
  • Aiken County Schools
  • Therapeutic Counseling Coordinator

2
YOUTH SUICIDE
PREVENTION
  • Suicide Facts Statistics
  • Aiken County Statistics
  • Myths about Suicide
  • Possible Reasons for Suicide
  • Warning Signs
  • Assessment
  • Action Plan and Referrals
  • Aiken County Schools Procedure

3
SUICIDE FACTS STATISTICS(American Association
of Suicidology, 2005)
  • 11th leading cause of death in U.S.
  • Every 16.1 minutes another life is lost to
    suicide 86 suicides per day.
  • Total suicide deaths was 32,637 (05).
  • Rate was 11/100,000 (05).
  • 1.3 total deaths were suicides. Three leading
    causes of deaths heart disease (29), cancer
    (23), cerebrovascular disease 6.8).
  • Suicide outnumbered homicides (20,308) by 3 to 2.
  • Twice as many deaths due to suicide than HIV/AIDS
    (14,175) .

4
  • Suicide by firearms was most common method for
    men and women 52 of all suicides more common
    for males.
  • Poisoning is more common for females.
  • Most common methods of suicide are by firearms,
    suffocation/hanging, and poisoning.
  • More men than women died by suicide
  • Gender ratio was 41.
  • 72 of all suicide deaths were white men.
  • 80 of all firearm suicide deaths were white men.
  • Highest suicide rate was for the elderly, 80 and
    older.

5
  • Intermountain states have the highest rate of
    suicide (Montana, Nevada, Alaska, New Mexico,
    Wyoming and Colorado).
  • District of Columbia, New Jersey, and New York
    are ranked the lowest for suicide.
  • 2003 S.C. ranked 26th for suicide in nation at
    rate of 12 per 100,000, with the national rate
    being 11 per 100,000.
  • May is the most common month for suicides.
  • Suicide rates usually decrease in war times and
    increase during economic crisis.

6
YOUTH SUICIDE
  • Youth ages 15-24, rates increased more than 200
    from 1950s to late 1970s. From 1970s to mid
    1990s rates stabilized, and since then have
    slightly decreased.
  • Suicide was the 3rd leading cause of death among
    youth ages 15-24 years, following accidents and
    homicides.
  • 2005 of 32,637 suicides, 4,212 were ages 15 to
    24 270 were ages 10-14.
  • Highest rates are for Caucasian youth highest
    increase in for African American youth.
  • Firearms are most common method suffocation
    rates have increased.

7
YOUTH SUICIDE
  • Most teen suicides occur in homes and after
    school hours.
  • In high schools, about 3 students have made a
    suicide attempt per year.
  • Precipitating factor is usually interpersonal
    conflict and suicides are done to try to change
    the attitudes of others.

8
Suicide Rates for 15-19 Year Olds from 1980-1999
  • 1980 8.5
  • 1981 8.6
  • 1982 8.7
  • 1983 8.7
  • 1984 8.9
  • 1985 9.9
  • 1986 10.1
  • 1987 10.2
  • 1988 11.1
  • 1989 11.1
  • 1990 11.1
  • 1991 11.1
  • 1992 10.8
  • 1993 10.9
  • 1994 11.1 increase 80-94 is 19
  • 1995 10.5
  • 1996 9.7
  • 1998 8.9
  • 1999 8.2 decrease since 94 is 26

9
(No Transcript)
10
Suicide Attempts
  • There are an estimated 8-25 attempted suicides to
    one completion, depending on age and gender.
  • Life-time rates of attempts indicates
  • Ratio is higher in women and youth and lower in
    men and elderly.
  • More women than men report suicide attempts
    gender ratio of 31.
  • Strongest risk factors for attempts in adults are
    mood disorders and substance use disorders.
  • Strongest risk factors for attempts in youth are
    mood disorders, substance use disorders,
    aggressive or disruptive disorders and history of
    physical and sexual abuse.

11
AIKEN COUNTY SUICIDE STATISTICS
(1997-2007)
  • 1997 15 (None under the age of 20)
  • 1998 21 ( 2 under age of 20)
  • 2 white males, ages 12 13
  • 1999 19 (1 under age of 20)
  • 1 black male, age 13
  • 2000 18 (1 under age of 20)
  • 1 white male, age 13
  • 2001 25 (2 under age of 20)
  • 2 white males, ages 18 19
  • 2002 15 (1 under 20)
  • 1 white male, age 18
  • 2003 25 (1 under 20)
  • 1 white male, age 17
  • 2004 25 (1 under 20)
  • 1 white male, age 12
  • 2005 10 (0 under 20)
  • 2006 14 (0 under 20)
  • 2007 23 (1 under 20)
  • 1 white male, age 19

12
MYTHS ABOUT SUICIDE
  • A person who threatens suicide wont really
    follow through.
  • Only insane people commit suicide.
  • Talking about suicide might prompt the person to
    act.
  • Suicide is a problem among old people not
    young people.

13
  • No one I know is the type to commit suicide.
  • People who attempt suicide are just trying to
    get attention.
  • Once a person decides to commit suicide, nothing
    can stop that person.
  • People who attempt suicide really want to die.

14
POSSIBLE REASONS FOR SUICIDE
  • Depression Helpless, Hopeless, Hapless
  • Family Problems
  • Significant Loss
  • Pressure to Succeed
  • Poor Self-Esteem
  • Problems with Growing Up

15
SUICIDE WARNING SIGNS
  • Historical Warning Signs
  • A previous attempt
  • Suicidal behavior in family
  • Recent death of friend or relative
  • Teenager has already hurt himself/herself
  • Verbal Threats
  • Talk of reunion with deceased
  • Im going to kill myself.
  • Things just dont matter anymore.
  • I just want to stop hurting so much.

16
  • Changes in Behavior
  • Difficulty concentrating increase in daydreaming
  • Sudden changes in personality / mood
  • More disobedient / rebellious than normal
    increase in aggression trouble with the police
  • Quitting or getting fired from a job
  • Writing songs, or poems on death or suicide
  • Buys guns, collects pills, or other unusual
    purchases
  • Sexual promiscuity
  • Running away from home
  • Writes an upsetting note or a will
  • Arranging to have pet taken care of while they
    are away
  • Inability or unwillingness to communicate
  • Substance abuse
  • Giving away possessions
  • Not wanting to be touched by others

17
  • Physical Warning Signs
  • Deterioration of physical appearance
  • Develops eating problems (eating too much or too
    little)
  • Significant change in weight
  • Sleeping problems (sleeping too little or too
    much)
  • Cries often for no apparent reason
  • Increased physical complaints (headaches, stomach
    aches, frequent doctor visits)
  • Self-mutilation behaviors
  • Fear of pregnancy

18
  • Social Warning Signs
  • Withdrawing from family and friends
  • Recent break-up with boyfriend /girlfriend
  • Recent argument with parent, stepparent, or other
    relative or friend
  • Family dysfunction
  • Major disappointment or humiliation
  • Apologizing to friends or relatives for an old
    argument
  • Talking to friends about suicide
  • Exposure to violence, incest, rape
  • Inability to relate well to peers
  • Feelings of guilt, failure, having no control
    over their life

19
  • Emotional Warning Signs
  • Deep and prolonged depression
  • Sudden unexplained and dramatic recovery from
    depression
  • Treating serious problems as if they no longer
    mattered
  • Preoccupation with hopeless view of life or
    fixation on death
  • Irritable with little or no provocation
  • Low self-esteem and feelings of worthlessness
  • Loneliness
  • Feelings of being trapped (hopeless / helpless)
  • Anguish due to loss of loved one through death,
    divorce or distance

20
  • Academic Warning Signs
  • Late to classes, skipping classes
  • Decline in school performance
  • Poor concentration, sleepiness, inattentiveness
  • Death or suicide themes dominate written,
    artistic or creative work
  • Loss of interest in previously pleasurable
    activities
  • Inability to tolerate praise or rewards
  • Other Signs

21
DOS DONTS OF ASSESSMENT
  • DO
  • Do Be Direct (Are you considering suicide? Do
    you have a plan? Will you talk with someone
    who can help?
  • Do Be a Good Listener (Sound calm and
    understanding use reflective listening ask
    questions that help to define the problem)
  • Do Show That You Care (Be positive emphasize
    more desirable alternatives help them identify
    sources of support)
  • Do emphasize that suicide is a permanent solution
    to a temporary problem.
  • Do Get Help

22
  • DONT
  • Dont Sidestep the Issue
  • Dont Sound Shocked
  • Dont Debate with the Person
  • Dont Physically Remove a Weapon from a Person
    Instead,Talk the Weapon Away from Them
  • Dont Keep What You Know a Secret
  • Dont Leave the Person Alone
  • Dont Feel Responsible for Saving the Person

23
IMPORTANT QUESTIONS
  • 1) Do you have a PLAN?
  • 2) Do you have the MEANS available to hurt
    yourself?
  • 3) WHEN do you plan on hurting yourself?

24
ACTION PLAN AND REFERRALS
  • ACTION PLAN FOR TEACHERS
  • Tell the student that you must take them to
    guidance or an administrator according to school
    policy.
  • Take the student to guidance or an administrator
    and explain to them what your concerns are.

25
  • ACTION PLAN FOR GUIDANCE /OR ADMINISTRATION
  • Let the student know that you have to call a
    parent or guardian.
  • Call the parent or guardian in front of the
    student.
  • Let the parent or guardian know that you are
    concerned about their child being suicidal and
    that you feel that they need to be seen by a
    professional.
  • Ask if they have someone in mind to take their
    child to. If not, give them referral
    information. A suicidal child needs to be seen
    by a therapist or a psychiatrist.

26
  • ACTION PLAN FOR GUIDANCE /OR ADMINISTRATION
  • Stress the importance of their taking immediate
    action.
  • You can require them to show you proof of the
    student being seen by a therapist or psychiatrist
    prior to their readmission to school.

27
  • Referrals
  • HELPLINE 211 1-877-648-9900 (Long Distance)
  • TEENLINE 1-877-TEEN-211
  • AIKEN CENTER 641-1900
  • AIKEN DSS 649-1111 (Main ), 642-3601 (Abuse
    Reports)
  • AIKEN-BARNWELL MENTAL HEALTH CENTER (FOR
    IMMEDIATE ASSISTANCE) 641-7700
  • AURORA PAVILION BEHAVIORAL HEALTH SERVICES (FOR
    IMMEDIATE ASSISTANCE) 641-5900
  • DJJ 641-7735
  • CUMBEE CENTER 649-0480
  • GAYLE LOFGRENS CELL 215-5786
  • (Therapeutic Counseling Coordinator)

28
  • After Hours Emergencies
  • Suicidal child can be taken to the ER at Aiken
    Regional and will be seen by RESPOND staff from
    Aurora Pavilion.
  • Determination will be made as to whether the
    child needs to be hospitalized or referred for
    outpatient treatment.

29
  • Your responsibilities as a referral agent
  • Stress the importance of follow through to the
    parent. (Many youth are never seen again in
    therapy after a suicide attempt.)
  • If the parent does not have the child seen by a
    professional you can call DSS for neglect. It is
    your choice as to whether or not you tell the
    parent you have done this.
  • You may have to call the parent at home
    after-hours.
  • You should let the parents know that there is a
    charge for the child to be seen at the ER and at
    Mental Health (Medicaid, insurance, sliding fee
    scale). Aurora does not charge for the initial
    assessment, but does charge for an admission to
    the unit and for outpatient services. Private
    therapists do charge for their services.

30
Aiken County School District Procedure on Dealing
with a Suicidal Student
  • See the procedure

31
CONCLUSION
  • Suicide can be prevented.
  • Recognition of risk factors is critical.
  • Depression, isolation, prior suicide attempts,
    substance abuse and serious mental illness rank
    as highly significant contributors.
  • Swift and decisive interventions based on a
    thorough assessment can save lives.
  • YOUR INTERVENTIONS CAN AND DO MAKE A DIFFERENCE!!
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