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Science Fair Projects

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Science Fair Projects. Susann Doyle-Portillo, Ph.D. Chair, SRC/IRB GCSEF ... Science fair projects also give students a chance to learn in a hands-on fashion, ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Science Fair Projects


1
Science Fair Projects
  • Susann Doyle-Portillo, Ph.D.
  • Chair, SRC/IRB GCSEF

2
Why have students do a science fair project?
  • Science projects can help build
  • Creativity
  • Motivation
  • Critical thinking skills
  • Research skills
  • Writing skills
  • Mathematical skills
  • Communication skills
  • Social skills (team projects)

3
  • Science fair projects also give students a chance
    to learn in a hands-on fashion, which may reach
    some students that are not reached by more
    traditional methods.

4
  • At the GCSEF students have an opportunity to
    compete for prizes and a chance to go to state
  • Prizes for 2006 have not been determined, but
    past prizes have included medals, ribbons,
    savings bonds, full scholarships to Gainesville
    College, magazine subscriptions, t-shirts, etc.

5
Science Fair Hierarchy
  • ISEF
  • GSEF
  • GCSEF
  • Your Schools Fair

6
Getting Started
  • Commit to the idea of having students do projects
  • Have students volunteer
  • Make projects mandatory
  • You can have projects or parts of projects
    function as assignments. Some schools use
    projects as cross-disciplinary projects (e.g.,
    language arts and science).

7
Read the Rule Book!
  • State Science Fair rules are rather complex, but
    once you get a handle on them, its not so bad.
  • As soon as you receive a card from us in the
    fall, log on and download a copy of the rule
    book. (www.uga.edu.oasp)
  • Reading the book will familiarize you with the
    various paperwork requirements for different
    types of projects.

8
Required Forms
  • All of this is subject to change when the state
    revises the rule book for 2006.
  • But..
  • All projects require
  • A Sponsor
  • An Application
  • An Official Abstract Form
  • Form 1- Adult Sponsor Check Sheet
  • Form 1A or Team 1A- Research Plan Attachment
  • Form 1B- Approval Form

9
Some Projects Require Additional Forms
  • Any project involving human subjects
  • Any project involving vertebrates
  • Any project involving blood/tissues
  • Any project involving pathogens (all molds are
    considered pathogens)
  • Any project involving hazardous materials or
    devices (e.g., chemicals, including some
    household radiation, welders, etc.)

10
Continued
  • Any project conducted in a laboratory outside of
    the school
  • Any project that is a continuation from the
    previous year

11
These Projects May Require
  • Paperwork specific to the project type (e.g.,
    Forms 1C 7)
  • Qualified Scientists or designated supervisors
  • SRC/IRB Approval

12
These Projects Require SRC/IRB Approval PRIOR to
Experimentation
  • Any project involving human subjects
  • Any project involving vertebrates
  • Any project involving blood/tissues
  • Any project involving pathogens (all molds are
    considered pathogens)

13
SRC/IRB Membership
  • IRB A science teacher, school administrator, a
    human subjects specialist (MD, RN, psychologist,
    psychiatrist, PA, or MSW)
  • SRC biomedical scientist (Ph.D., DVM, MD, DO, or
    DDS), science teacher, and one other member
  • You can combine committees
  • For example Psychologist, School administrator,
    science teacher, DVM

14
FAQs About SRC/IRB
  • Do We Have to Have an IRB/SRC?
  • Only if your students will do projects that
    require SRC/IRB approval.
  • My school doesnt require SRC/IRB for our local
    fair. Can we go back and approve projects after
    they have been completed?
  • No
  • Why do we have to go through SRC/IRB approval?
  • State regulations require it. It protects
    everyone involved- the student, subjects, and the
    school. Its good training for students.

15
How Can I Get Through This with a Minimum of
Stress?
  • Read the rule book BEFORE you begin having
    students work on projects.
  • Possibly set up an SRC/IRB at the system or GYSTC
    level
  • Make some contacts with professionals in the
    community to serve as qualified scientists
    perhaps your local PTO/PTA can help with this.

16
Continued
  • Direct students to do projects that require less
    approval and less paper work-
  • i.e., no tissues, animals, humans, pathogens, or
    hazardous materials/equipment.
  • Get parents involved. Send copies of the rule
    book home.
  • Have students work in teams to reduce the number
    of projects you sponsor

17
Where Can Students Get Ideas for Projects?
  • From material covered in courses (e.g., science
    or social science classes)
  • From their own curiosity (my favorite)
  • Do brainstorming exercises with students
  • From their own research
  • From a science fair web site (my least favorite
    because it stifles creativity and critical
    thinking)

18
Project Components
  • 3-sided Poster (be sure to follow display rules
    listed in rule book)
  • Project Notebook (Contains originals of all forms
    and the research report)
  • Log Book (Contains all notes on the project and
    raw data)
  • Official Abstract Form

19
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