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Introduction to Social software and Web 2.0 platforms to leverage and share knowledge

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Title: Introduction to Social software and Web 2.0 platforms to leverage and share knowledge


1
Introduction to Social software and Web 2.0
platforms to leverage and share knowledge
  • Roxanne Hiltz Cathy Dwyer
  • NJIT Pace University
    Newark, NJ New York, NY

2
Todays planned schedule
  • Session 1 9 am - 1015 am
  • Welcome and Brief tutorial and demo of major
    socialware applications(Roxanne Hiltz Cathy
    Dwyer) 45 mins
  • Introduction to "back channel" technologies use
    during rest of tutorial.(Todd Richmond)   10
    mins
  • 30- 45 second introductions- (name,
    organization, 1 sentence on main research
    interests related to social software- to
    facilitate networking).
  • Coffee Break 1015 am 1045 am

3
Session 2 1045- noon
  • Tools Folksonomies, syndication, etc. (Chris
    Lott, 20 mins)
  • Web based social networking systems for the
    general public (e.g., MySpace, Facebook, etc) 
    (Cathy Dwyer)  (30 mins)  
  • Interactive activity
  • Lunch break, noon- 1 pm ("on your own" but let's
    make plans for those who want to eat together?)

4
Session 3 1 pm- 215 pm
  • SocialWare in Education "Enhancing the Claremont
    Conversation in the 21st Century"   (Lorne
    Olfman) (30 minutes) 
  • Geotemporal aware, mobile networking systems The
    example of SmartCampus (Roxanne Hiltz) (30 mins) 
      
  • Case study or interactive activity- 15 mins
  • Coffee break 215- 245

5
Session 4 245 pm - 4 pm
  • Commmunity building around information and
    documents with wikis, blogs, social annotation
    tools like Diigo, etc. (Chris Lott, 25 mins)
  • Backchannel systems   A debriefing, Todd
    Richmond ( 20 mins)
  • General discussion of future scenarios and
    implications of SocialWare (Lorne, moderator) (20
    mins)
  • END at 4 pm

6
This Introduction will
  • Define social software
  • Overview some of the main examples/ systems now
    in use, and the kinds of social issues they raise
  • Review todays planned agenda

7
What is Social Software? (SocialWare)
  • Social software enables people to rendezvous,
    connect or collaborate through computer-mediated
    communication and to form online communities.
  • (From Wikipedia, December 2006)

8
Social software definition, cont.
  • Broadly conceived, this term could encompass
    older media such as mailing lists, computer
    conferencing, Group Support Systems, and Usenet,
    but some would restrict its meaning to more
    recent software genres such as blogs and wikis
    and social networking sites.
  • We will focus today on the newer applications,
    sometimes referred to as Web 2.0 and Web 3.0

9
Social Software definition
  • Common to most definitions is the observation
    that some types of software seem to facilitate
    "bottom-up" community development, in which
    membership is voluntary, reputations are earned
    by winning the trust of other members, and the
    community's mission and governance are defined by
    the communities' members themselves

10
Social Software definition
  • Also social software systems create persistent
    links between users, and through these persistent
    links, a community is formed. The control of
    these links - who is linked, and who isn't - is
    in the hands of the user.
  • Thus, these links are asymmetrical - you might
    link to me, but I might not link to you. Also,
    these links are functional, not decorative - you
    can choose not to receive any content from people
    you are not connected to, for example.

11
Some key components
  • Support for conversational interaction between
    individuals or groups

Discussion forum from LiveJournal community for
the Big Island
12
Content sharing
  • Sharing information, artifacts (e.g., pictures
    or videos)
  • Media content triggers connections
  • Tagging of videos, posting of comments
  • Connecting with other fans

13
Caption of the week contest from Squizzle
14
Social Networks
  • Support for social networks to explicitly
    create and manage a digital expression of
    people's personal relationships, and to help
    them build new relationships.

15
(key components)
  • Support for social feedback which allows a
    group to rate the contributions of others,
    perhaps implicitly, leading to the creation of
    digital reputation.

16
Social Software Examples
  • Social networking MySpace, Facebook, CyWorld

17
Other Examples
  • Self expression and blogging LiveJournal
  • Content sharing
  • Music Pandora, Yahoo Radio, iTunes
  • Video YouTube, Squizzle, Break
  • Recommendations and ratings eBay, Amazon,
    Netflix, Tribe
  • Mobile social software Dodgeball

18
Youtube is a hit
From www.alexa.com
19
iTunes shares playlists of celebrities
20
CiteULike tagged references, links to online
articles, download references in EndNote
21
Diana M. used Dodgeball to introduce herself to
someone she saw on the subway, but was too shy to
speak to. "I checked in to dodgeball," she said,
and "I got an alert that 'so-and-so has a crush
on you, and he is at X bar, go and say hi.'" she
said. "I now had a valid and less-frightening
excuse to meet him," McGunigle said. "I can't
tell you how many people I've met through this,"
said McGunigle. "It has not only simplified my
socializing habits, but has allowed me to meet
people I would not have met otherwise."
22
Social Data mining
  • What value can be extracted from social
    information? What social patterns exist in
    information?
  • Google
  • Google ranking system based on popularity of
    links
  • Google scholar ranks based on references
  • Google news ranks news stories on analysis of
    news sites

23
Algorithm determines importance and placement of
news story no human editors
24
Social data mining
  • Recommender systems
  • Collaborative systems wiki
  • Enables coordination of public debate
  • Knowledge sharing
  • del.icio.us and CiteULike

25
(No Transcript)
26
Advantages of Social Software
  • Leverage social knowledge
  • Use tools to analyze knowledge on line
  • Use tools to aggregate social knowledge within
    your team

27
Social software issues include
  • Privacy- control over who has access to
    information about you
  • Facebook privacy policy Facebook may collect
    information about you from other sources, such as
    newspapers, blogs, instant messaging services in
    order to provide you with more useful information
    and a more personalized experience.
  • Reliability- how do we know we can trust what
    others post online?
  • WikiPedia
  • Social relationships- how do the relationships
    formed affect the nature and quality of social
    interactions?

28
Todays planned schedule
  • Session 1 9 am - 1015 am
  • Welcome and Brief tutorial and demo of major
    socialware applications(Roxanne Hiltz Cathy
    Dwyer) 45 mins
  • Introduction to "back channel" technologies use
    during rest of tutorial.(Todd Richmond)   10
    mins
  • 30- 45 second introductions- (name,
    organization, 1 sentence on main research
    interests related to social software- to
    facilitate networking).
  • Coffee Break 1015 am 1045 am

29
Session 2, 1045- noon
  • Web based social networking systems for the
    general public (e.g., MySpace, Facebook, etc) 
    (Cathy Dwyer)  (30 mins)
  • Tools Folksonomies, syndication, etc. (Chris
    Lott, 20 mins)  
  • Interactive activity
  • D. Lunch break, noon- 1 pm ("on your own" but
    let's make plans for those who want to eat
    together?)

30
Session 3 1- 215
  • SocialWare in Education "Enhancing the Claremont
    Conversation in the 21st Century"   (Lorne
    Olfman) (30 minutes) 
  • Geotemporal aware, mobile networking systems The
    example of SmartCampus (Roxanne Hiltz) (30 mins) 
      
  • Case study or interactive activity- 15 mins
  • coffee break 215- 245

31
Session 4 245- 4 pm
  • Community building around information and
    documents with wikis, blogs, social annotation
    tools like Diigo, etc. (Chris Lott, 20 mins)
  • Backchannel systems   A debriefing and concerns
    about social software- Todd Richmond ( 25 mins)
  • General discussion of future scenarios and
    implications of SocialWare (Lorne, moderator) (20
    mins)
  • END at 4 pm

32
(No Transcript)
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