SCHOOL LEADERSHIP - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – SCHOOL LEADERSHIP PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: 24d569-ZGFiN



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

SCHOOL LEADERSHIP

Description:

SCHOOL LEADERSHIP THAT WORKS. A comprehensive meta-analysis of the research ... Refers to the extent to which the school leader is aware of best practices in ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:10782
Avg rating:3.0/5.0

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: SCHOOL LEADERSHIP


1
SCHOOL LEADERSHIP
T H A T W O R K S
2
WORM HOLES LEADING TO
TERMS
OTHER 10
MAGNIFICENT 7
LT SCRIPT
DON'T GO HERE
FATAL FOUR
Georgia will lead the nation in improving student
achievement.
3
ACTIVITY
DEMYSTIFYING SCHOOL LEADERSHIP
Think of good school (or system) leaders that you
have known. What made them successful? Think of
weak school (or system) leaders that you have
known. What made them unsuccessful?
Georgia will lead the nation in improving student
achievement.
4
Bob Marzano Senior Scholar McREL
Tim Waters CEO McREL
Brian McNulty VP Field Services McREL
SCHOOL LEADERSHIP THAT WORKS
A BLEND OF RESEARCH AND PRACTICAL ADVICE
Georgia will lead the nation in improving student
achievement.
5
EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH LABS
Georgia will lead the nation in improving student
achievement.
6
SCHOOL LEADERSHIP THAT WORKS A comprehensive
meta-analysis of the research on school
leadership and student achievement. 69 studies
involving 2,802 schools, 1.4 million students,
and 14,000 teachers were reviewed. 21 Leadership
Responsibilities were identified. A substantial
relationship exists between leadership and
student achievement. The average correlation
between leadership and student achievement is .25.
Georgia will lead the nation in improving student
achievement.
7
1. Situational Awareness (.33) is aware of
details and undercurrents in the school and
addresses potential problems
2. Intellectual Stimulation (.32) ensures that
staff are aware of the most current theories
practices and discusses them often
3. Input (.30) involves teachers in the design
and implementation of important decisions and
policies
4. Change Agent (.30) is willing to actively
challenge the status quo
5. Culture (.29) fosters shared beliefs
sense of community/cooperation
6. Outreach (.28) is an advocate
spokesperson for the school to all stakeholders
7. Monitors/Evaluates (.28) monitors the
effectiveness of school practices their
impact on student learning
Georgia will lead the nation in improving student
achievement.
8
08. Resources (.26) provides teachers with
materials professional learning to support
their work
09. Order (.26) establishes a set of standard
operating procedures
10. Affirmation (.25) recognizes and
celebrates school accomplishments and
acknowledges failures
11. Ideals/Beliefs (.25) communicates and
operates from strong ideals and beliefs about
schooling
12. Focus (.24) establishes clear goals and
keeps those goals in the forefront of the
schools attention
13. Knowledge of Curriculum, Assessment and
Instruction (.24) has a clear understanding
of the teaching and learning dynamics and
expects the same from others
14. Discipline (.24) protects teachers from
issues and influences that would detract from
their teaching time or focus
Georgia will lead the nation in improving student
achievement.
9
15. Communication (.23) establishes strong
lines of communication with teachers and among
students
16. Flexibility (.22) adapts his or her
leadership behavior to the needs of the current
situation and is comfortable with dissent
17. Optimizer (.20) inspires and leads new and
challenging innovations
18. Relationships (.19) demonstrates an
awareness of the personal aspects of teachers
and staff
19. Visibility (.16) has quality
contact/interaction with teachers students
20. Involvement of Curriculum, Assessment and
Instruction (.16) is directly involved in the
design implementation of curriculum,
assessment and instructional practices
21. Contingent Rewards (.15) recognizes and
rewards individual accomplishments
Georgia will lead the nation in improving student
achievement.
10
KNOWLEDGE OF CURRICULUM, ASSESSMENT INSTRUCTION
Refers to the extent to which the school leader
is aware of best practices in
curriculum, assessment instruction
INVOLVEMENT IN CURRICULUM, ASSESSMENT
INSTRUCTION
Refers to the extent to which the school
leader is directly involved in the design
implementation of curriculum, assessment
instruction activities at the classroom level
Georgia will lead the nation in improving student
achievement.
11
One standard deviation increase in a principals
ability will result in a 10 percent increase in
student achievement.
Principal B
Principal A
10
-3 -2 -1 0
1 2 3
Georgia will lead the nation in improving student
achievement.
12
How are the 21 responsibilities
interrelated? How should the 21 Responsibilities
be applied to real
world daily practice? McRELs FACTOR
ANALYSIS A 92-item survey was given to over 650
principals. 7 responsibilities positively
associated with 2nd order change 4
responsibilities negatively associated with 2nd
order change Leadership Teams and shared
responsibilities are vital.
Georgia will lead the nation in improving student
achievement.
13
First Order Change perceived as . . .
Second Order Change perceived as . . .
An extension of the past
Breaking with the past
Fits within existing paradigms
Outside the existing paradigms
Conflicts with prevailing values and norms
Consistent with prevailing values and norms
Requires the acquisition of new knowledge and
skills
Can be implemented with existing knowledge and
skills
Requires resources available to those responsible
for implementing the innovations
Requires resources that are not currently
available to those responsible for implementing
the innovations
There is common agreement that the innovation is
necessary
Only those who have a broad perspective of the
school see that the innovation is necessary
14
AVOIDING NEGATIVES
N P U T
C O M M U N I C A T I O N
C L T U R E
R D E R
Georgia will lead the nation in improving student
achievement.
15
  • During an innovation leaders may have to
  • Endure the perception that team spirit,
    cooperation, and common language have
    deteriorated as a result of the innovation.
    CULTURE
  • Endure the perception that communication has
    deteriorated as a result of the innovation.
    COMMUNICATION
  • Endure the perception that order and routine have
    deteriorated as a result of the innovation.
    ORDER
  • Endure the perception that the level of input has
    deteriorated as a result of the innovation.
    INPUT

Georgia will lead the nation in improving student
achievement.
16
A Plan for Effective School Leadership
STEP 1 Develop a strong Leadership Team STEP
2 Distribute responsibilities throughout the
Leadership Team STEP 3 Select the Right
Work STEP 4 Identify the Order of Magnitude
implied by the work that has been
selected STEP 5 Match the Management Style
to the Order of Magnitude of the Change
Initiative
ICE
Georgia will lead the nation in improving student
achievement.
17
Using Your School Leadership Team
To De-Stress the Principalship
Georgia will lead the nation in improving student
achievement.
18
WHY DO WE NEED A TEAM?
  • None of us is as smart as all of us. -
    Blanchard
  • Thomas Edison, when asked why he had a team of
    twenty-one assistants If I could solve all
    the problems myself, I would.
  • A demanding challenge tends to create a
    team. - Katzenback Smith
  • GPS Roll Out
  • Georgia will lead the Nation in Improving
    Student Achievement. - Supt. Kathy Cox

Georgia will lead the nation in improving student
achievement.
19
Get the Right People on the Bus then decide
where to drive it. - Jim Collins, Good to
Great
  • Choose your Leadership Team wisely.
  • Surround yourself with the right people.
  • Then decide where your school is going.

If you select the right people, motivation is
never a problem and dealing with change is easier.
Georgia will lead the nation in improving student
achievement.
20
WHAT DO YOU WANT ON YOUR TEAM?
LEADERSHIP
HUMOR
INFLUENCE
ENERGY
TECH SKILLS
SKILLS TALENTS TRAITS
MODELING
KNOWLEDGE
RESPECTED
PEOPLE SKILLS
CREATIVITY
CURIOSITY
Georgia will lead the nation in improving student
achievement.
21
BUILDING THE DREAM TEAM
Does your team represent the best in your
building? Avoid Blockers but not
Skeptics. Avoid the Yes People
Temptation. Combine the Left and Right Brain
Thinkers.
Georgia will lead the nation in improving student
achievement.
22
ASK FOR HELP WITH ANY STEP!
No
Does SLT exist?
Decide Next Step
Sort a
What Are Their Topics? Core Work?
Yes
23
TEAM STAGES
Forming Storming Norming Performing
-Tuckman
Georgia will lead the nation in improving student
achievement.
24
GEORGIA SCHOOL STANDARDS EIGHT STRANDS OF QUALITY
Curriculum
Instruction
Assessment
Planning and Organization
Student, Family Community Support
Professional Learning
Leadership
School Culture
Georgia will lead the nation in improving student
achievement.
25
THE REAL MAGIC BUS
LEADERSHIP
Georgia will lead the nation in improving student
achievement.
26
(No Transcript)
27
(No Transcript)
28
(No Transcript)
29
(No Transcript)
30
(No Transcript)
31
(No Transcript)
32
SLT HANDOUT
33
HYPERLINKS
34

Section Five
The Role of Administratorsin a Standards-Based
School
GPS
35
Implementing the GPS
Requires Us to Change the Way We Do Our Work
  • Leadership for change is most effective when
    carried out by a small group of educators with
    the principals functioning as a strong cohesive
    force.
  • The leadership team must operate in such a way as
    to provide strong guidance while demonstrating
    respect for those not on the team.
  • Effective leadership for change is characterized
    by specific behaviors that enhance interpersonal
    relationships. -Marzano

GPS
Georgia will lead the nation in improving student
achievement.
36
BUILDING THE DREAM TEAM
Define the Set of Skills, Talents and Traits that
you want on your School Leadership
Team. Think Discuss List Be Ready to Share
37

Regarding Forming and Storming
The ratio of We's to I's is the best indicator
of the development of a team. - Ergen
Gettin' good players is easy. Gettin' 'em to
play together is the hard part. - Stengel
Effective teamwork is all about making a good,
well-balanced salad, not whipping individuals
into a single batch of V8. - Richardson
38
Georgia will lead the nation in improving student
achievement.
39
21 Leadership Responsibilities
40
Reflect, then share with your table group. Think
about individuals you have known who
were successful school leaders. What traits,
talents or skills did they possess that
ensured success? Think about individuals you
have known who were unsuccessful as school
leaders. What traits or limitations brought
about their failures?
41
Our Responsibility
  • Determine ways to involve other leaders within
    the school or the system to focus on the four
    responsibilities negatively impacted
  • Improve demonstrated ability in all
    21 leadership responsibilities
  • Focus on the 7 responsibilities
    positively associated with 2nd order change
  • Adjust leadership practices accordingly
  • Lead change dont let change lead you!

42
Who is the best person to move your school
from GOOD TO GREAT?
I DO
43
WHAT WORKS FOR ALL STAFF AND STUDENTS
  • The school leader understands and supports Due
    Process Procedures. (Order)
  • The school leader encourages collaboration
    between regular education and special education
    staff and understands the importance of services
    in the Least Restrictive Environment. (Ideals
    and Beliefs)
  • The school leader recognizes special education
    personnel for the time commitment needed for IEP
    development and implementation. (Affirmation)
  • The school leader sets high standards and goals
    for special education students and ELL students.
    (Culture)
  • The school leader utilizes creative scheduling to
    meet the needs of students with disabilities.
    (Flexibility)

44
SO HOW WILL YOUR ROLE CHANGE?
NOW
THEN
Checking lesson plans
Analyzing student work
45
THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN
46
CHANGE AGENT Refers to the leaders disposition
to challenge the status quo, to protect
those who take risks, and to temporarily upset
the equilibrium of a school This responsibility
is demonstrated when The school leader says to
the faculty Perhaps we are becoming too
comfortable with ourselves. What could we be
doing that we are not? School Leadership Team
Members should Model a can do attitude
formulate agreements about supporting
initiatives, i.e. no badmouthing the change.
47
FLEXIBILITY Refers to the school leaders
ability to adapt his or her
behavior to the needs of the current situation
This responsibility is demonstrated when The
principal directly intervenes into a decision
being made by members of the mathematics
department because it will have negative
consequences for other faculty members. School
Leadership Team Members should Support the
principal when the situations require a more
directive style of leadership.
48
IDEALS/BELIEFS Refers to the principles or
concepts that define the way the
school leader operates This responsibility is
demonstrated when The principal begins the
school year by writing and distributing to
faculty members a description of his ideals and
beliefs about how a school should be run. School
Leadership Team Members should Make agreements
about the schools mission and assist in turning
adopted beliefs into observable behaviors.
49
INTELLECTUAL STIMULATION Refers to the school
leader ensuring that staff are
aware of the most current practices regarding
effective schooling and makes discussions of
those practices a regular aspect of the schools
culture This responsibility is demonstrated
when The principal institutes a book study
regarding differentiation of instruction. School
Leadership Team Members should Use language
with peers that demonstrates knowledge of
differentiation and its value to instruction.
50
KNOWLEDGE OF CURRICULUM, ASSESSMENT
INSTRUCTION Refers to the extent to which the
school leader is aware of best practices in
curriculum, assessment, and instruction This
responsibility is demonstrated when The
principal reads a book on the research supporting
a balanced assessment program that the school is
considering adopting. School Leadership Team
Members should Attend and actively participate
in professional learning opportunities regarding
the innovation.
51
MONITORING/EVALUATING Refers to the extent to
which the leader monitors the
effectiveness of school practices
and their impact on student achievement This
responsibility is demonstrated when The school
leader systematically observes the implementation
of a new science program. School Leadership Team
Members should Ensure that the aligned and
intended curriculum is taught (i.e.,
observations, team planning, and student work).
52
OPTIMIZER Refers to the extent to which the
school leader inspires others and is the
driving force when implementing a challenging
innovation This responsibility is demonstrated
when The principal announces that she
understands that implementing a new curriculum
will have difficult moments and will take time,
but that she will support it and provide the
staff the necessary resources. School Leadership
Team Members should Use data to celebrate
progress toward the new goals.
53
THE FATAL FOUR
54
COMMUNICATION
Refers to the extent to which the school leader
establishes strong lines of communication with
and between teachers and students The
responsibility is demonstrated when The school
leader sets up and presides over informal
discussion sessions every two weeks after school
where teachers can discuss their
concerns. School Leadership Team Members
should Probe for questions and concerns from
colleagues and bring them to the leadership team
for resolution.
55
CULTURE
Refers to the extent to which the school leader
fosters shared beliefs and a sense of community
and cooperation among staff This responsibility
is demonstrated when The principal takes time
at faculty meetings to point out and praise
examples of teachers working together. School
Leadership Team Members should Generate, in
learning teams, explicit ideas and connections
about how the innovation can advance the shared
purpose of the school.
56
INPUT
Refers to the extent to which the school leader
involves teachers in the design and
implementation of important decisions and
policies This responsibility is demonstrated
when The school leader uses the leadership team
in decision making. School Leadership Team
Members should Actively seek input from the
staff and work to develop ownership rather than
just buy in for the initiative.
57
ORDER
Refers to the extent to which the school
leader provides and reinforces clear
structures, rules, and procedures for
students and staff This responsibility is
demonstrated when The school leader establishes
and implements an equitable system for monitoring
the lunch room. School Leadership Team Members
should Take an active role in creating and
implementing school rules and operational
procedures.
58
(No Transcript)
59
THE OTHER 10
60
AFFIRMATION
  • Refers to the extent to which the leader
  • recognizes and celebrates school
  • accomplishments as well as acknowledges failures
  • Recognizes and celebrates the accomplishments of
    students
  • Recognizes and celebrates the accomplishments of
    teachers
  • Recognizes and recognizes the failure of the
    school as a whole

61
AFFIRMATION
  • This responsibility is demonstrated when
  • The School Leader acknowledges that a certain
    group of students or the school as a whole has
    raised scores on the state test by five
    percentile points.
  • The School Leader announces at a faculty meeting
    that members of the social studies faculty have
    just had an article accepted in a professional
    journal.
  • The School Leader announces to the faculty that
    the goal they set of decreasing student
    referrals during the semester has not been met.

62
CONTIGENT REWARDS
  • Refers to the extent to which the school leader
    recognizes and rewards individual accomplishments
  • Using hard work and results as the basis for
    rewards and recognition
  • Using performance versus seniority as a primary
    criterion for rewards and recognition.

63
CONTIGENT REWARDS
This responsibility is demonstrated when The
principal singles out and praises a teacher who
has put in extra time for the last month working
with students whose reading comprehension scores
are below grade level. The principal awards
teachers, whose students have shown exceptional
growth in learning, a trip to a local conference
on best practices.
64
DISCIPLINE
  • Refers to protecting teachers from issues
    and influences that would detract from their
    instructional time or focus
  • Protecting instructional time from interruptions
  • Protecting/Sheltering teachers from internal and
    external distractions

65
DISCIPLINE
This responsibility is demonstrated when The
school leader establishes and enforces a policy
that no announcements are to made during
instructional time. The school leader handles
an issue with the local media in a way that does
not involve individual teachers.
66
FOCUS
  • Refers to the extent to which the school leader
    establishes clear goals and keeps those goals in
    the forefront of the schools attention.
  • Establishing concrete goals for curriculum,
    instruction, and assessment practices within the
    school
  • Establishing concrete goals for the general
    functioning of the school
  • Establishes high, concrete goals and expectations
    that all students meet them
  • Continually keeping attention on established goals

67
FOCUS
This responsibility is demonstrated when The
school leader and the staff set a goal that by
the end of the year, the curriculum will be
aligned with the state standards and the state
test in all subject areas. The school leader
and the faculty set a goal that by the end of the
year, 65 of the students will be at standard or
above in mathematics. The school leader reminds
faculty members of the school goals at faculty
meetings.
68
INVOLVEMENT IN CURRICULUM, INSTRUCTION
ASSESSMENT
  • Refers to the extent to which the school leader
    is directly involved in the design and
    implementation of curriculum, instruction, and
    assessment activities at the classroom level
  • Being directly involved in helping teachers
    design curricular activities
  • Being directly involved in helping teachers
    address assessment issues
  • Being directly involved in helping teachers
    address instructional issues

69
INVOLVEMENT IN CURRICULUM, INSTRUCTION
ASSESSMENT
This responsibility is demonstrated when The
school leader regularly meets with teachers to go
over the use of end-of-quarter tests that have
been developed. The school leader meets with
members of the science department to discuss how
they will ensure that the required science
courses address the content of the science
section on the state test.
70
OUTREACH
  • Refers to the extent to which the school leader
    is an advocate and spokesperson for the
    school to all stakeholders
  • Ensuring that the school complies with all
    district and state mandates
  • Being an advocate of the school with parents
  • Being an advocate of the school with the central
    office
  • Being an advocate of the school with the
    community at large

71
OUTREACH
This responsibility is demonstrated when The
principal systematically reviews all district
regulations to ensure that her school is in
compliance. The principal regularly sends a
memo to the superintendent detailing the latest
accomplishments of the school.
72
RELATIONSHIPS
  • Refers to the extent to which the school leader
    demonstrates an awareness of the personal lives
    of teachers and staff
  • Being informed about significant personal issues
    within the lives of staff members
  • Being aware of the personal needs of teachers
  • Acknowledging significant events in the lives of
    staff members
  • Maintaining personal relationships with teachers

73
RELATIONSHIPS
This responsibility is demonstrated when The
school leader sends flowers in the name of the
school to the family of a teacher who has lost a
loved one to illness. The school leader makes
an effort to say hello to every teacher in the
school at least once per day and ask them how
they are doing.
74
RESOURCES
  • Refers to the extent to which the school leader
    provides teachers with materials and professional
    development necessary for the successful
    execution of their duties
  • Ensuring that teachers have the necessary
    materials and equipment
  • Ensuring that teachers have the necessary staff
    development opportunities that directly enhance
    their teaching

75
RESOURCES
This responsibility is demonstrated when The
principal meets with every teacher once a month
inquiring about their needs regarding materials.
The principal schedules a staff development
session on a topic that has been explicitly
requested by teachers.
76
SITUATIONAL AWARENESS
  • Refers to the school leaders awareness of the
    details and undercurrents regarding the
    functioning of the school and his or her use
    of this information to address current and
    potential problems
  • Accurately what could go wrong from day to day
  • Being aware of informal groups and relationships
    among the staff
  • Being aware of issues in the school that have not
    surfaced but could create discord

77
SITUATIONAL AWARENESS
This responsibility is demonstrated when The
school leader studies the schedule in an attempt
to identify hidden problems that it creates for
teachers or students. The school leader meets
with a group of teachers whom he has heard are
disappointed in a decision he has recently made.
78
VISIBILITY
  • Refers to the extent to which that school leader
    has contact and interacts with teachers,
    students and parents
  • Making systematic and frequent visits to
    classrooms
  • Having frequent contact with students
  • Being highly visible to students, teachers, and
    parents

79
VISIBILITY
This responsibility is demonstrated when The
principal attends school football, basketball and
baseball games as frequently as possible. The
principal makes daily visits to classrooms simply
to ask teachers and students how things are going.
About PowerShow.com