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Session 3: Sports and Race in American History

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Session 3: Sports and Race in American History. Session 3: Sports and Race ... Harry E. Winkler Collection of boxing photographs: http://www.nd.edu/~joycecol ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Session 3: Sports and Race in American History


1
Session 3 Sports and Race in American History
2
  • Session 3 Sports and Race in American History
  • I. Welcome, and three major themes
  • II. Do the Right Thing sports possibilities
    and limitations
  • III. Case Study 1 the tumultuous career of Jack
    Johnson
  • A. African Americans turn-of-the century
    opportunities in sports
  • B. The idea of muscular assimilation
  • C. Mixed feelings regarding Johnsons
    championship
  • D. Johnsons legacy
  • IV. Case Study 2 Jackie Robinsons pioneering
    role
  • A. The contextthe Double V campaign
  • B. Branch Rickeys experiment
  • C. Robinsons faith in integration, and its
    resultant triumphs
  • D. On-going limitations
  • V. Case Study 3 The Black Athlete Revolt of
    1968
  • A. Moment of transition in civil rights
  • B. Black athletes get politically active
  • C. The Olympic Boycott and other protests
  • D. Jack Olsons series in Sports Illustrated

3
Major Themes
  • Faith in sports as a model for racial equality
  • The conveyance of racial stereotypes through
    sports
  • The place of activism in sports (sports
    connection to the realm of the political)

4
  • Mookie Pino, all you ever talk about is nigger
    this, and nigger that. And all your favorite
    people are so-called niggers.
  • Pino Its different. Magic Johnson, Eddie
    Murphy, Prince are not niggers, I mean, are not
    Black. … I mean, theyre Black, but theyre not
    really Black. Theyre more than Black. Its
    different.1
  • 1 Spike Lee, dir., Do the Right Thing (MCA Home
    Video, 1990).

5
http//www.sports-photos.com/catalog/images/JackJo
hnson1905BW.jpg
6
  • Session 3 Sports and Race in American History
  • I. Welcome, and three major themes
  • II. Do the Right Thing sports possibilities
    and limitations
  • III. Case Study 1 the tumultuous career of Jack
    Johnson
  • A. African Americans turn-of-the century
    opportunities in sports
  • B. The idea of muscular assimilation
  • C. Mixed feelings regarding Johnsons
    championship
  • D. Johnsons legacy
  • IV. Case Study 2 Jackie Robinsons pioneering
    role
  • A. The contextthe Double V campaign
  • B. Branch Rickeys experiment
  • C. Robinsons faith in integration, and its
    resultant triumphs
  • D. On-going limitations
  • V. Case Study 3 The Black Athlete Revolt of
    1968
  • A. Moment of transition in civil rights
  • B. Black athletes get politically active
  • C. The Olympic Boycott and other protests
  • D. Jack Olsons series in Sports Illustrated

7
(No Transcript)
8
http//www.nd.edu/joycecol/exhibits/winkexhibit/W
right.710-39-36.jpg
9
  • Session 3 Sports and Race in American History
  • I. Welcome, and three major themes
  • II. Do the Right Thing sports possibilities
    and limitations
  • III. Case Study 1 the tumultuous career of Jack
    Johnson
  • A. African Americans turn-of-the century
    opportunities in sports
  • B. The idea of muscular assimilation
  • C. Mixed feelings regarding Johnsons
    championship
  • D. Johnsons legacy
  • IV. Case Study 2 Jackie Robinsons pioneering
    role
  • A. The contextthe Double V campaign
  • B. Branch Rickeys experiment
  • C. Robinsons faith in integration, and its
    resultant triumphs
  • D. On-going limitations
  • V. Case Study 3 The Black Athlete Revolt of
    1968
  • A. Moment of transition in civil rights
  • B. Black athletes get politically active
  • C. The Olympic Boycott and other protests
  • D. Jack Olsons series in Sports Illustrated

10
Belle Schreiber, one of Johnsons white wives.
Photo from Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel
http//graphics.jsonline.com/graphics/owlive/img/j
an05/belle_011305_big.jpg
11
Image from Harry E. Winkler Collection of boxing
photographs http//www.nd.edu/joycecol/exhibits
/winkexhibit/JohnsonJ.710-18-89.jpg
12
  • Session 3 Sports and Race in American History
  • I. Welcome, and three major themes
  • II. Do the Right Thing sports possibilities
    and limitations
  • III. Case Study 1 the tumultuous career of Jack
    Johnson
  • A. African Americans turn-of-the century
    opportunities in sports
  • B. The idea of muscular assimilation
  • C. Mixed feelings regarding Johnsons
    championship
  • D. Johnsons legacy
  • IV. Case Study 2 Jackie Robinsons pioneering
    role
  • A. The contextthe Double V campaign
  • B. Branch Rickeys experiment
  • C. Robinsons faith in integration, and its
    resultant triumphs
  • D. On-going limitations
  • V. Case Study 3 The Black Athlete Revolt of
    1968
  • A. Moment of transition in civil rights
  • B. Black athletes get politically active
  • C. The Olympic Boycott and other protests
  • D. Jack Olsons series in Sports Illustrated

13
(No Transcript)
14
  • "My Lord, What a Morning
  • by William Waring Cuney
  • O my Lord
  • What a morning,
  • O my Lord,
  • What a feeling,
  • When Jack Johnson
  • Turned Jim Jeffries'
  • Snow-white face
  • to the ceiling.

15
  • Session 3 Sports and Race in American History
  • I. Welcome, and three major themes
  • II. Do the Right Thing sports possibilities
    and limitations
  • III. Case Study 1 the tumultuous career of Jack
    Johnson
  • A. African Americans turn-of-the century
    opportunities in sports
  • B. The idea of muscular assimilation
  • C. Mixed feelings regarding Johnsons
    championship
  • D. Johnsons legacy
  • IV. Case Study 2 Jackie Robinsons pioneering
    role
  • A. The contextthe Double V campaign
  • B. Branch Rickeys experiment
  • C. Robinsons faith in integration, and its
    resultant triumphs
  • D. On-going limitations
  • V. Case Study 3 The Black Athlete Revolt of
    1968
  • A. Moment of transition in civil rights
  • B. Black athletes get politically active
  • C. The Olympic Boycott and other protests
  • D. Jack Olsons series in Sports Illustrated

16
http//www.medaloffreedom.com/JackieRobinsonlg.jpg
17
Branch Rickey. Photo from Society for American
Baseball Research http//www.sabr.org/cmsimgs/Bra
nch20Rickey20photo202201c.jpg
18
  • Mr. Rickey, do you want a ballplayer whos
    afraid to fight back?
  • And Rickey responded I want a player with guts
    enough not to fight back.1
  • 1 Jules Tygiel, Baseballs Great Experiment, 66.

19
From Library of Congress exhibit.
20
  • Jackie Robinson with Phillies manager Ben
    Chapman.
  • From www.explorepahistory.com

21
  • Session 3 Sports and Race in American History
  • I. Welcome, and three major themes
  • II. Do the Right Thing sports possibilities
    and limitations
  • III. Case Study 1 the tumultuous career of Jack
    Johnson
  • A. African Americans turn-of-the century
    opportunities in sports
  • B. The idea of muscular assimilation
  • C. Mixed feelings regarding Johnsons
    championship
  • D. Johnsons legacy
  • IV. Case Study 2 Jackie Robinsons pioneering
    role
  • A. The contextthe Double V campaign
  • B. Branch Rickeys experiment
  • C. Robinsons faith in integration, and its
    resultant triumphs
  • D. On-going limitations
  • V. Case Study 3 The Black Athlete Revolt of
    1968
  • A. Moment of transition in civil rights
  • B. Black athletes get politically active
  • C. The Olympic Boycott and other protests
  • D. Jack Olsons series in Sports Illustrated

22
  • Stokeley Carmichael addressing Florida A M
    students. http//www.crmvet.org/crmpics/stokeley-f
    am.jpg

23
(No Transcript)
24
(No Transcript)
25
  • In 1968 alone, black athletes engaged in some
    form of political activism and protest at the
    following schools
  • Berkeley
  • Western Michigan University
  • Princeton
  • Michigan State
  • Oklahoma City
  • UTEP
  • San Francisco State College
  • Marquette University
  • University of Kansas
  • University of Oklahoma
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

26
Jack Olson, The Black Athlete A Shameful
Story, Sports Illustrated, July 1968
  • 1) the inadequate academic assistance given to
    black athletes
  • 2) social taboos against interracial dating
  • 3) the practice of stacking black athletes at
    certain positions to keep their numbers limited
    on the playing field
  • 4) racial animosity from white players and
    coaches
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