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Title: A%20Brief%20History%20of%20Medical%20Imaging


1
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Welcome to an on-line health and safety training
package intended for staff and students working
within UofE buildings on the Little France campus.
Information contained within these pages is for
use by University of Edinburgh staff and students
only.
2
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
This on-line training package is not intended as
a substitute for attending a formal presentation
on fire safety arrangements for the Little France
site, which is mandatory for all staff who have
not previously attended one dates and venues for
these are regularly advertised. Please attend
formal training as soon as you can.
Last updated February, 2015
3
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Please take time to view the following material,
and direct any urgent questions to your HS
Advisor, Senior Laboratory Manager, or the Little
France Buildings HS Manager (the contact details
for whom are shown on the last page of this
presentation).
Thank you
4
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
The arrangements summarised in this presentation
apply equally to all three UofE buildings on the
Little France campus (the Chancellors Building,
Queens Medical Research Institute and the
Scottish Centre for Regenerative Medicine), but
are broadly applicable also for UofE embedded
spaces within the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh.
5
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Upon hearing a fire alarm
NEVER assume that its going to turn out to be a
false alarm.
6
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
FIRE KILLS
7
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Treat every single fire alarm as though you are
at real and immediate risk of death, and react
accordingly, with all due urgency.
8
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
On discovering fire
Automatic sensors (very widely distributed within
these buildings) will quickly detect smoke, heat
and fire, will make alarms sound, and will serve
also to prompt an alert to the Fire Rescue
Service.
9
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
In fact the detectors are so sensitive that they
are most usually activated by dust and sunlight
streaming in through windows etc But, as has
been made clear before, never react as though
its going to turn out to be a false alarm,
however many of these there may have been
recently.
10
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Raise the alarm ..
You may spot a fire even before the sensors are
activated.
11
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
No automatic fire alarm seems to work quite as
well as people shouting out the word Fire!
So, even if the alarms are already sounding,
call out to colleagues and other people in the
area.
12
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Activate a fire alarm call point
Press against the front of any one of the
red-coloured fire alarm call points (pressing
lightly over the black spot between the two black
arrows) That will activate the sounders.
13
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
A Fire Action Notice is located alongside each
fire alarm call-point, summarising actions that
should be taken in the event of discovering fire
or hearing alarms begin to sound
But the time to become familiar
with these arrangements is now, and not when fire
is licking at the backs of your heels.
14
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Take time every so often to read (and regularly
reread) one of the Fire Action Notices for your
area, so that your reaction to any fire emergency
is immediate and correct, and so that your
response is quite intuitive.
The guidance is broadly applicable to any fire
emergency affecting any large premises.
15
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Emergency Door Releases
Some doors in our buildings are normally kept
securely shut, to maintain quarantine barriers
for example.
If your most direct route to safety is
sign-posted as passing through one of those
doors, use the green touch-panels on the walls
alongside the doors to open them, but most such
doors will have automatically released when the
fire alarms first began to sound.
16
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Fire alarm sounds
  • Be aware of the two different alarm sounds that
    may be heard
  • Continuous sound ()
  • Intermittent sound (- - - - - - )
  • and the quite different reactions that are
    expected of you upon hearing each of these

17
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Continuous alarm
People hearing a continuously sounding alarm
() should
Evacuate immediately!
18
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
So, when the alarms begin to sound continuously
.
Get up
Get out
And stay out!
19
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
And that advice applies every bit as much to fire
alarms sounding in other places where you might
be, such as shopping malls, cinemas, theatres,
concert venues, restaurants, pubs and clubs.
anywhere in this country or overseas. Whatever
others may or may not do when alarms begin to
sound continuously, you should react promptly and
correctly to the threat of fire.
20
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Intermittent alarm
People hearing an intermittently sounding alarm
(- - - - - - - ) are being alerted to the
possibility that there may be a fire in another
part of the building. But the area in which they
are hearing an intermittent alarm is not at
immediate risk, and people there do not need to
evacuate immediately.
21
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Intermittent alarm
Note, however, that intermittent alarms
(sometimes known as pulsed alarms) are a feature
of the fire alarm systems only in the
Chancellors Building and Royal Infirmary of
Edinburgh, and not in the QMRI or SCRM, where
different building design features dictate
different strategies.
22
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Why have two different sounds?
Why not just evacuate everyone right away?
Well, that is a possibility, and certainly
everyone may be required to evacuate right away
... But usually it will be one part of the
building only that could be at risk.
There are three good reasons for this two-stage
strategy
23
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
1. Building design means that large areas of our
buildings can be protected from others by
physical distances, wall thicknesses, fire doors
etc so that a fire simply could not spread
quickly from one area to another ...
24
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
There is no need, therefore, to evacuate
hundreds of people from a building, when only a
few dozen might conceivably be at risk (even if
nothing at all was done to fight a fire).
Remember, though, that the Fire Service will
already be responding to an alarm that has been
raised.
25
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
2. The same building design features allow for
the possibility of people with mobility
impairment evacuating horizontally from an
affected upper floor area, avoiding stairwells
(which might be a problem for them), so that they
can head to an adjacent safe area on the same
floor, where the lifts will remain usable, and
then descend to ground level and a safe exit from
the building.
26
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Note that there is no danger of becoming stuck in
a lift if the alarm state escalates as, in those
circumstances, the lift will descend to ground
level, the doors will open, and people may then
exit the lift. Only then will the lift cease to
be available for further use.
But please reserve lifts for use by those who may
have special needs (e.g. mobility impairment).
27
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
3. People in areas not at immediate threat, where
the alarms are sounding only intermittently (or
perhaps not yet sounding at all), can use the
extra time available to take steps to prepare for
the possibility of an escalation and the need to
evacuate
28
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
For example, you can make your laboratory safer
by returning flammable substances to safety
cabinets, turning off gas supplies, securing
pathogens and radioactive sources, closing doors
and windows etc, and prepare for the possibility
that the alarm state might escalate to a
continuous sound (), dictating the need
for you to immediately evacuate the area.
29
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Its worth noting that if nothing is done to
resolve the situation making alarms sound
continuously in one part of the building within
fifteen minutes, alarms in adjacent areas will
begin to sound continuously too, as a precaution,
dictating that many more people will need to
evacuate.
30
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
And in that context its worth knowing that on a
good day, with roads relatively free of
congestion, it may take 15 minutes for the Fire
and Rescue Service to reach us, so the need for a
precautionary extended evacuation may well be
signalled by pulsing alarms beginning to sound
continuously
31
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Our buildings are large, and sometimes sounds
echo within them, possibly making it difficult to
tell whether youre hearing a continuously
sounding alarm () or an intermittent
alarm (- - - - - - - ), or from what direction.
If in doubt, though, always treat it as an
immediate threat to your safety, and evacuate
right away.
32
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
The fire alarm system for the Scottish Centre for
Regenerative Medicine (SCRM) building is liked to
an automated voice broadcast system, and a spoken
message will be repeated on loudspeakers
throughout the building until the emergency is
resolved or the alarms are silenced by
fire-fighters. The message will direct building
occupiers to evacuate the premises.
33
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
The Fire Services initial response to an alarm
activated by an automatic sensor will be to send
a single fire appliance, and crew of no more than
half a dozen fire-fighters, and it may take as
long as fifteen minutes (and maybe even longer)
for them to get here, even from the closest fire
station.
34
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Prior to the first fire crew arriving, the Fire
Rescue Service will not respond with greater
numbers unless the automated detection is
backed-up by human intelligence confirming that
there really is a fire (e.g. A telephoned verbal
message saying, I could smell smoke, and then I
saw flames or I could feel intense heat through
the walls of the room next to where I was
working).
35
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
So, after raising an alarm
  • Update the emergency services
  • by dialling 2222 from any
  • extension at a place of safety.
  • You will be prompted by a
  • switchboard operator to provide
  • your name, the address of the
  • building, and the precise location
  • and nature of the emergency.

36
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
2222? Not 222?
  • While its 222 in some places (and it
  • used to be 222 in Little France),
  • most switchboards now use 2222 as
  • the emergency number.
  • But you need to know also that dialling
  • 2222 wont result in a medical
  • emergency crash team coming into to
  • one of our buildings. To get urgent
  • medical assistance you must dial (9)999.

37
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
The additional information conveyed by a 2222
call will be passed on to the Fire Rescue
Service, which will upgrade the response, maybe
even before the first fire-fighters arrive
on-site.
Yes, its possible that several people will phone
2222 ... But better that than everyone assuming
that someone else has made the call, and it
ending up with no-one doing so!
38
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Basically therefore, if you are in possession of
any information that you know the Fire rescue
service would wish to know, please do not
hesitate to make a 2222 call from a place of
safety.
Other things that fire-fighters would wish to
know, well in advance, is whether there are
compressed gas cylinders or particularly
hazardous substances within the affected area.
39
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Evacuation
  • Proceed to the NEAREST
  • ESCAPE ROUTE (closing doors
  • behind you to help trap fire and
  • smoke).
  • Follow white-on-green running
  • man signs and white arrows to
  • the NEAREST EXIT.

40
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Do not delay your evacuation by collecting
personal possessions
These are generally replaceable You invariably
arent!
41
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Though if its an intermittent alarm that youre
hearing (- - - - -), it might be wise to scoop
up your house and car keys in case the alarm
state escalates and it becomes necessary to
evacuate the building.
42
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Remember, though, as a precautionary measure, if
the cause of the alarm cannot be identified and
resolved within approximately fifteen minutes,
all alarms (including those that had been
sounding only intermittently) will begin to sound
continuously, and all occupiers will then be
required to evacuate.
43
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
The NEAREST ESCAPE ROUTE may well be along a path
that you would not normally use to travel through
the building but it is one that has been
calculated to be the most sensible route to
safety from wherever you happen to be when you
first hear the fire alarms begin to sound.
44
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
The escape route may well lead you to a fire exit
door through which you would not normally enter
or leave the building either. Do not assume that
the best route to safety is the same route that
you usually use to enter and leave the building
It may well not be.
45
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Yes, but where is my escape route?
  • Look for white-on-green running
  • man signs, which point out the
  • best route to the exit closest to
  • where you are standing at the time
  • (wherever you are in the buildings)
  • when alarms start to sound
  • Proceed in the direction indicated
  • by the arrow towards the nearest
  • exit.

46
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
  • If youre in a basement, the arrow is
  • likely to be encouraging you to
  • climb up a stairwell to reach ground
  • floor exit.
  • If youre on an upper floor room,
  • itll certainly be pointing downward.
  • And every time you turn a corner,
  • you should quickly spot another sign
  • pointing toward the exit closest to
  • where you are at that moment.

47
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
What if the route is obstructed?
  • If so, simply turn around, proceed
  • away from the obstruction, and look
  • for signs pointing to the nearest
  • alternative exit.
  • Proceed in the direction indicated
  • by the white arrows towards the
  • nearest alternative exit.

48
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Where is the nearest Fire Exit?
  • Ultimately, the white-on-green
  • running man signs are pointing
  • you towards the Fire Exit closest to
  • where you are standing at the time
  • (wherever you are in the building).
  • The final exit will be signed like
  • this (see left) which, you will note,
  • has no white arrow.

49
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
And what do I do when I reach it?
  • Simply push the bar (or operate an
  • alternative door release
  • mechanism) and proceed
  • through the open doors to a safe
  • location away from the building.
  • Fire escape routes and fire doors
  • must be kept free from
  • obstructions, and are surveyed
  • regularly by Fire Wardens.

50
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
What if the Fire Exit is obstructed?
  • As is the case for an obstructed fire
  • escape route simply turn around,
  • proceed away from the obstruction,
  • and look for signs pointing to the
  • nearest alternative exit.
  • Proceed in the direction indicated
  • by the white arrows towards the
  • nearest alternative exit.

51
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
And then ?
  • Proceed directly to the correct
  • Evacuation Assembly Point for
  • your building.
  • Unexplained absences amongst
  • your colleagues and any visitors
  • to your area must be reported to
  • attending fire-fighters as quickly
  • as possible..

52
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
  • Dont re-enter the building until
  • you are told that its safe to do so
  • by fire-fighters (though, given the size
  • of our buildings, be prepared for that
  • to take some time).

53
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Where are the Evacuation Assembly Points?
  • For the Chancellors Building, its
  • within the car park behind the building,
  • at the farthest corner distant from the
  • building
  • For the QMRI (including CRIC), its in
  • front of the Chancellors Building
  • common room windows and
  • For SCRM, its on the path leading to
  • the car park to the west of the building.

54
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
55
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
56
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
57
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Why there?
  • Its to avoid people clustering around the door
    of the building from which theyve just
    evacuated, which makes it difficult
  • For those still trying to evacuate to get
    through
  • them to safety and
  • For fire-fighters to get through them and into
  • the building but also because
  • Standing too close may expose you to flying
  • glass exploding outwards from a building thats
  • on fire.

58
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Is that likely?
Remember your high school physics If the
building really is on fire, temperatures will be
increasing, and so will air pressure, and few of
our windows are capable of being opened So
glass will eventually explode outwards, and
possibly over quite some distance.
Youll want to avoid that!
59
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
So, whatever else others may be doing, always use
the designated Evacuation Assembly Point for your
building. Youll be far safer there than people
who remain close to the building from which they
have been evacuated.
60
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
If youre required to evacuate on a cold, rainy
or snowy day, no-one is expecting you to have to
remain at the Assembly Point in discomfort for a
prolonged period of time. Once your colleagues
know that you have safety evacuated, by all means
proceed to shelter in one of the other buildings.
61
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Mobility Impairment
It is extremely important that people with any
form of mobility impairment, whether temporary or
permanent, including people who may not be able
to hear fire alarms, should report these facts
immediately to their senior laboratory manager so
that special arrangements can be made for their
protection in the event of a building emergency.
62
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
  • Not all mobility impairments are
  • immediately apparent to a casual observer
  • (e.g. angina or emphysema), and problems
  • may also be associated with hearing or
  • visual impairments.
  • Equally, a mobility impairment may be
  • quite temporary (e.g. a broken leg
  • following a sporting injury, but which has
  • been managed by plastering the broken
  • limb, which would make it difficult for
  • that person to negotiate stairs in the event
  • of the need to evacuate the building).

63
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Special arrangements for people with (e.g.)
mobility impairments
  • A Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan
  • will be prepared and tailored to the special
  • needs of each person with (e.g.) mobility
  • impairment
  • Fire Stewards may have special extra
  • responsibilities in such cases
  • Special communications may be provided
  • Safe areas (Refuges) certainly exist but
  • Consider also the possibility of visual and
  • hearing disabilities.

64
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
  • Fire Action Notices for Disabled People are
  • displayed around the buildings these are
  • essentially mostly for the benefit of
    short-term
  • visitors, and should be pointed out to them for
  • information shortly after their arrival.
  • For longer-term visitors, and staff and
  • students with special needs, a Personal
  • Emergency Evacuation Plan must be prepared.
  • Further information may be obtained from the
  • Health Safety Manager (contact details for
  • whom are shown towards the end of this
  • presentation).

65
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
A separate e-training module is available at
http//docstore.mvm.ed.ac.uk/HealthAndSafety/pre
sentations/MobilityImpairment.ppt in which
special arrangements for people with mobility
impairments are described in greater detail.
66
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Fire-fighting
There are fire extinguishers all around the
building Should I grab one and try putting out
the fire?
67
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
The correct first action is not to reach for a
fire extinguisher It is to raise the alarm!
Otherwise time spent tackling a fire, and quite
possibly failing to bring it under control, will
be time that has been wasted in failing to
evacuate people to safety.
68
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Its also vital that you know and understand that
no property or premises is worth more than a
single human life, and that preservation of life,
most certainly including your own, takes primacy,
each and every time.
69
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
After raising the alarm and ensuring that the
evacuation has begun, and if youve received some
training in the correct use of these you really,
really know what you are doing, maybe you can
begin to think about fire-fighting, but
70
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
  • ALWAYS
  • Confirm that the alarm has first been
  • raised, and ensure that people are
  • beginning to evacuate and
  • Know the proper use and limitations
  • on use of each type of extinguisher
  • (Its possible to make a bad situation
  • a whole lot worse by using the wrong
  • type of extinguisher).

71
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
  • NEVER
  • Take personal risks or attempt or continue to
    fight a fire
  • If your escape route might be cut off
  • by fire or smoke
  • If the fire continues to grow in spite of
  • your efforts or
  • If there are gas cylinders or other
  • flammable or explosive items nearby.

72
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
If youre not entirely confident on any of these
points DO NOT (never, ever) attempt to tackle
the fire.
To repeat Your life and safety, and that of
others, is infinitely more important than any
building or property!
73
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
All the information that you need to know about
each type of fire extinguisher is written onto
the extinguisher itself (and sometimes also
displayed on the wall where it is mounted). But
the time to learn about this stuff for the first
time is not when a fire has broken out. If you
dont already know, dont take a risk Get up,
get out, and stay out!
74
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
And it is critically important to understand that
fire extinguishers are NOT provided for you (or
anyone else) to use them as door stops NEVER
EVER!
75
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
While it is not unreasonable to wedge open a fire
door temporarily while you move materials
into or out of a room, for example always
remove the wedge as soon as you have finished
moving the materials.
76
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Signage and Information
Green signs draw attention to safety guidance,
including signs related to fire safety.
77
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Signage and Information
Red signs draw attention to a prohibition and/or
relate to fire safety.
78
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Signage and Information
Yellow signs draw attention to warning, which may
include specific fire risks.
79
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Monitoring Fire Safety
Arrangements for University buildings on the
Little France campus are monitored by appointed
Fire Wardens who conduct weekly checks, and also
through programmes of inspections led by the
Universitys Fire Safety Unit. An annual fire
drill is held for each building.
80
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Fire Alarm Tests
  • Alarms are tested as follows
  • Chancellors Building Every
  • Friday at 1000
  • QMRI Every Wednesday at
  • 1100
  • SCRM Every Friday at 1000

Be alert to sudden noise and automatically
closing doors
81
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Fire Drills
Emergency arrangements, including actual
evacuation of buildings, is practised annually
within the Universitys larger estate, with
buildings on the Little France campus typically
being subject to drills in September each year.
82
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Make it your most urgent priority now to
  • Familiarise yourself with the
  • location of Fire Alarm Call Points,
  • particularly in the areas where you
  • will be working most often
  • Read a Fire Action Notice
  • Know the location of Fire
  • Escape Routes and Fire Exits from
  • the areas where you work.

83
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Further Information
  • Section 5 - Fire Procedures
  • Section 6 Mobility impairment
  • and buildings emergencies
  • http//www.ed.ac.uk/schools-departments/medicine-v
    et-medicine/staff-students/staff/health-and-safety
    /manual

84
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Further Information
UofEs Fire Safety Unit, 13 Infirmary
Street Edinburgh EH1 1NP Tel 651 1226 Fax 651
4261 Email Fire_at_ed.ac.uk
85
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
Lindsay Murray Health Safety Manager, The
University of Edinburgh, College of Medicine
Veterinary Medicine (Chancellors Building,
Medical School and Queens Medical Research
Institute), Little France
Room SU215, Chancellors Building Ext
26390 lgm_at_staffmail.ed.ac.uk
86
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE FIRE SAFETY
You have now completed this on-line training
package summarising key aspects of fire safety
arrangements for the Little France site. Please
attend a formal presentation as soon as you can.
Dates and venues will be advertised.
Thank you
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