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Archived: A Culture of Reading Florin High School (MS PowerPoint)

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... THE ACHIEVEMENT GAP. Study Overview. Purpose ... Defining a Gap-Closing School ... El Camino narrowed the gap for Hispanic students in both math and reading. ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Archived: A Culture of Reading Florin High School (MS PowerPoint)


1
Archived InformationCLOSING THE ACHIEVEMENT
GAPStudy Overview
2
Purpose of the Study
  • To identify high schools in selected states that
    have shown success, over a period of years, in
    closing the achievement gap between minority and
    non-minority students.

3
State Selection Criteria
Publicly available school-level state assessment
data was collected from states meeting all of the
following
  • Standards-based or norm-referenced assessment in
    mathematics or English/language arts/reading in
    grade 10, 11, or 12
  • Data available for at least 4 years
  • The assessment had not changed over that period
  • Assessment results disaggregated by
    race/ethnicity at the school level

4
States Meeting Criteria
  • Arkansas
  • California
  • DC
  • Delaware
  • Kentucky
  • Indiana
  • Missouri
  • Oregon
  • South Carolina
  • Texas
  • Wisconsin

5
Defining the Gap
Gap
Difference between school-level percent passing
rate and state-level percent passing rate
6
Gap Example Mathematics Assessment
 
7
Defining a Gap-Closing School
  • A school with consistently diminished achievement
    gaps between white and minority students during
    each of four years.

8
GGap Measures
GAP (School Minority ScoresState White Scores)
Schools with 4 years of data in either reading or
math
African-AmericanGap READING
African-American Gap MATH
HispanicGap MATH
HispanicGap READING
9
Number of Schools by States
  • g Cr
  • California 173
  • Indiana 10
  • Texas 189

10
Closing the Achievement Gap Focus Group Meeting
With the CTAG state lists serving as a starting
point, the following criteria was applied to
identify the most promising candidates  
  • Closed gap or achieved a gap decrease of at
    least ten percentage points in two gap measures
  • African American Reading
  • African American Math
  • Hispanic Reading
  • Hispanic Math
  • For example
  • El Camino narrowed the gap for Hispanic
    students in both math and reading.
  • Florin narrowed the gap for Africa American and
    Hispanic students in reading.

11
Closing the Achievement Gap Focus Group Meeting
  • Enrollment size of at least 750 students
  • Minority enrollment of at least 30 percent of
    total enrollment and
  • Holding power of at least 60 percent.
  •  

12
Schools Selected
School characteristics are for 2001-2002, the
latest year for which data is available from
Common Core of Data (CCD)
13
www.schooldata.org
  • The National Longitudinal School Level
  • State Assessment Score Database
  • NLSLSASD, is an effort funded by the US
  • Department of Education to collect data
  • from state testing programs across the
  • country, and contains assessment scores
  • for approximately 80,000 public
  • schools in the U.S. for years up to
  • 2002-2003.

14
Del Valle High SchoolExemplary Campus
1987-2004
15
DVHS Demographics Challenges
  • 87.3 Free /Reduced Lunch
  • 97 Hispanic
  • Less than 2 miles from Mexico
  • 325 students are Mexican
    immigrants
  • 125 in ESOL classes
  • 2.8 dropout rate for 2000-2001

16
  • DVHS Graduation Requirements
  • 4 years of Math
  • 4 years of Social Studies
  • 4 years of Science
  • 4 years of English

17
Educational Reform   1992 Site Based
Management 1993 National Standards
Movement 1997 State Standards Become
TEKS Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills
18
  • Tests, Tests, Tests and more Tests
  •  
  • TABS
  • TEAMS
  • TAAS
  • RPTE
  • TAKS

19
What Hindered Progress? Lack of understanding of
accountability Lack of understanding of common
goal and a common vision for students Changes at
the Principal position (lucky 7)
20
  • Institution Response
  • Formation of Leadership Teams
  • Collaboration with University
  • Formation of CEIC Committee
  • Staff Development
  • Development of Campus Action Plan

21
  • Instructional Response
  • Higher Standards
  • No Remediation Classes
  • Focused Instruction
  • Block Schedule
  • A/B - 4 x 4 - Combination A/B

22
. . . a more focused approach Student
Profiles Support teachers for
math, reading, writing Modified schedule Specific
targeted instruction
23
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24
Kid by Kid Means KID BY KID  
25
Student Score Profiles
26
Student Scores by Teacher by Period
27
Del Valle High SchoolMath DepartmentEl Paso,
Texas
  • Raising The Bar For Students
  • Three Year Plan

28
Where Do We Start?
29
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30
Look at Standardized Scores
  • TAAS Algebra I
  • 1996 54 1996 2

31
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32
Identify Problems
  • Classroom assessments not aligned to TEKS (Texas
    Essential Knowledge Skills)
  • High failure rates
  • Too many students receiving 70-75 grades in
    Algebra I and geometry
  • Low standardized test scores
  • Inconsistent student knowledge of students
    entering geometry and Alg II

33
Change Starts With Teachers
34
Hunger For Change
  • Teachers desire to do right by students.
  • Teachers believe that students could do it.
  • Teachers realize that they could be better
    teachers through alignment and working together

35
Yes, Were Hungry
36
Goals For Math Department?
  • Improve instruction through alignment of
    curriculum using state curriculum TEKS
  • Align department tests to what is being taught
  • Increase number of students who pass math classes
    with higher scores
  • Increase standardized scores
  • Attain exemplary scores in state exams Algebra
    I End-of-Course and TAAS

37
Ok, Whats Next?
38
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42
Math Support Teacher
43
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44
What is the role of Support Teacher?
  • Act as math resource person
  • Model Lessons for Teachers
  • Conduct Weekly meetings in Algebra I on Fridays
  • Conduct Geometry meetings twice a month
  • Conduct monthly Department Meetings
  • Actively involved in master schedule
  • Have frequent discussions about student placement
    with Counselors and person in charge of master
    schedule

45
More?
  • Help create Lessons for Algebra I
  • Help create Lessons for Geometry
  • Write department tests for Algebra I and
    Geometry
  • Monitor and evaluate benchmarking
  • Maintain records for all students

46
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47
Teacher Training
  • One week Algebra I Institute for all teachers
  • One week calculator training for all teachers
  • Carnegie Learning Systems 1 week training for
    Algebra I teachers
  • Frequent training in alignment of curriculum,
    including summers

48
The New Curriculum
  • Align curriculum (TEKS) in core subjects
  • Plan the instructional year
  • Conduct Level Meetings
  • Create common lesson plans
  • Conduct frequent benchmarking to assess progress
    and areas of need
  • Provide levels of support kid by kid

49
Ongoing Plan
  • Actively visit student placement
  • Revise lessons plans as needed
  • Spiraling of tested items
  • Modify department tests
  • All teachers strive to become experts on what and
    how items are tested
  • Alignment of state curriculum (TEKS) to what is
    tested (TAKS)

50
TAAS Results 1996-2002
51
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54
  • History Making Success
  • NCLB Model School
  • Exemplary Status
  • .7 Dropout Rate
  • Texas Monthly 5 Star School
  • Pathfinder School
  • TBEC / Just for Kids Honor Roll

55
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57
No Child Left Behind
58
A Culture of ReadingFlorin High School
  • Florin High School
  • Established 1989
  • Restructured School Model
  • -Site-based Decision Making
  • -Effective Schools Committees
  • -Interdisciplinary Focus
  • Diverse Student Population
  • -2,300 Students
  • -27 Different Languages / 29 EL
  • -No Racial Majority
  • -56 Free and Reduced Lunch

59
Demographic Data
African American 22 Asian 35 Filipino
5 Hispanics 19 Pacific Islander
3 White 15
60
KEY FEATURES
6 Period Day Traditional Schedule Late Start
Wednesdays (for student contact) Tutoring
After School Variety of Intervention
Programs ELA/Library Collaboration
61
Creating a Comprehensive Approach to Building a
Culture of Reading Success
  • Outside Reading Program
  • Library Support
  • Intensive Intervention

62
Creating ReadersThrough an Outside Reading
Program
  • Teachers
  • recognized a disconnect between core
  • literature and our multi-cultural student
  • body
  • recognized that students were literacy
  • impoverished
  • needed literature that was powerful and
  • interesting to a diverse modern teen
  • population
  • needed school-wide support administrative
  • and interdisciplinary

63
Developing An Outside Reading Program
  • Involving Teachers
  • -teachers read Young Adult literature
  • -librarian and teachers choose titles based on
    student input and their own reading
  • -Young Adult Literature Advisory Group gives
    teachers a professional opportunity to read
    and discuss the books their students read
    to fill multi-cultural void
  • Inspiring Students
  • -students provided with multiple copies of
    literature that reflects their interests,
    cultures and readability levels
  • -librarian and teachers share new titles with
    students through book talks in the library
  • -books are available both in classrooms and in
    the library

64
Developing An Outside Reading Program
  • Defining the program
  • -Students are required to read 1,000 pages
    of self-selected literature per semester
    beyond the core curriculum (California State
    Reading Standard 2.0 by grade 12, read 2
    million words annually)
  • -Teachers dedicate class time (10 - 20)
    to SSR

65
Developing An Outside Reading Program
  • Building a Culture Of Reading
  • -teachers model reading during SSR
  • -teachers from other curricular areas encourage
  • students to read during down time
  • -students view the library as an inviting place
  • -no excuses mentality -- there are no
    non-readers
  • there are just students who havent found
    the
  • right book

66
Developing An Outside Reading Program
  • Creating Accountability
  • -outside reading requirement is consistent in
    all
  • English classes for all students
  • -outside reading requirement is part of
    students
  • English grade
  • -students guided to select engaging books that
    are
  • at or slightly above their individual
    reading levels
  • -students meet with teachers for oral book
  • interviews when they complete a book
  • -students and teacher maintain Books I have
  • Read list in students portfolios which are
  • passed on each year

67
Evidence of Change
  • Differences in total SAT-9 Scores
  • Classes of 2002 and 2003
  • Total Reading 1999 2000 2001 Change
  • Class of 2002 28 31 34 6
  • Class of 2003 30 32 2

68
Developing An Outside Reading Program
  • Key Components
  • staff participation
  • administrative support
  • ongoing opportunity to reflect and modify
    the outside reading program
  • partnership with library

69
Library Support
  • provide access and an inviting
    environment
  • provide direction for 9th and 10th graders
    through booktalks
  • purchase multiple copies of high- interest
    titles
  • make book boxes available in
  • classrooms
  • celebrate reading

70
Intervention Program
  • Assessing Needs and Choosing a Program
  • A burgeoning need across the district
  • District pilots Language!--1997
  • Site teachers are trained
  • Pilot class developed at Site--1999

71
Characteristics of a Successful Intervention
Program
  • Research Based-Systematic Program
  • Well Trained Teachers
  • Coaching Support
  • Mastery Approach
  • Carefully Selected Students
  • Extended Time In Class
  • Integrity in Presentation of Materials
  • Clear Entrance and Exit Criteria

72
Developing An Intervention
  • Step One
  • Creating A Class
  • -Training the teachers
  • -Developing a support team
  • -Setting up materials
  • -texts for teachers and students
  • -extra supplies (300 per teacher)

73
Developing An Intervention
  • Step Two
  • Finding the Students
  • -SAT 9/CST Scores
  • -Individual Testing
  • -encoding (Language!)
  • -decoding (Language!)
  • -comprehension (DRP)

74
Developing An Intervention
  • Step Three
  • Monitoring Student Progress
  • -Pre and Post Testing
  • -encoding decoding (Language!)
  • -comprehension (DRP)
  • -Interim Testing
  • -fluency
  • -accuracy Johns Test
  • -comprehension

75
Elk Grove, California Comprehension NPR
Gain/Loss GORT-3
76
Developing An Intervention
  • Step Four
  • Holding On
  • -articulation--Downward!
  • -Taking it to the middle school
  • -All 7th Grade Students Are Tested
  • -now piloting in the 4th and 5th Grades
  • Continued Work at the High School Level
  • -continuing work with students from the
  • feeder schools
  • -forming classes for new students without
  • previous intervention

77
Developing An Intervention
  • Step Five
  • Exiting Students
  • -maintaining a Mastery Program
  • -integrating grade level literature
  • and skills
  • -reassigning students to college
  • preparatory courses

78
Other Contributors
  • EL Program
  • Insights Program
  • Small Learning Communities
  • AVID Program
  • Site Buy-In and Support
  • Corrective Reading Special Ed.
  • Healthy Start
  • Counseling Program (SST Process)
  • Late Wednesday Start (Tutoring and Clubs)
  • Open Enrollment Honors Courses
  • Continuous Progress Monitoring Model

79
  • Questions
  • And
  • Answers
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