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Academic Advisement New Student Orientation Summer 2006

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... first semester, you have a pink sticker on your Registration Worksheet ... First, your math course is determined by your ELM score, or your SAT score using ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Academic Advisement New Student Orientation Summer 2006


1
Academic AdvisementNew Student
OrientationSummer 2006
  • Presented by
  • Academic Advisement Center

2
Academic Advisement Center
  • Contact Information
  • University Hall (UH) 123
  • (714) 278-3606
  • www.fullerton.edu/aac
  • Academic home for undeclared majors
  • We provide
  • General Education advisement for new and
    continuing students
  • Assistance in identifying appropriate courses at
    the community college

3
Academic Advisement Center
  • We also coordinate the Finish In Four program
  • Specialized advisement program which provides
    eligible full time students the opportunity to
    graduate in four years (guaranteed).
  • Information flyer and application in your packet.
  • If you have met the preliminary requirements,
    there is a green label on your registration
    worksheet
  • Give completed application to your NSO leader or
    AAC intern during peer advisement

4
High School vs. College
  • Mandatory free (usually)
  • Your time is structured by others
  • Most of your learning and work is done inside the
    classroom (approx. 30 hours per week in class)
  • Grades based on a variety of work
  • Requirements are laid out for you
  • Voluntary expensive
  • Choose your own schedule
  • Most of your learning happens outside of class
    (approx. 12-16 hours per week in class)
  • Grades may be based on 2 exams
  • Graduation requirements are complex and changing.
    You are responsible for knowing what applies to
    you

5
Choices
  • Today youll be making several choices
  • How many units do I take?
  • What classes do I take?
  • How should I schedule my time?
  • Were here to guide you through the answers to
    those questions.

6
Before we begin
  • The following slides are an overview of the
    General Education program, and some policies that
    you need to know about
  • Follow along with your yellow General Education
    Checklist

7
General Education
  • The GE program is organized into 5 categories for
    a total of 51 units (minimum)
  • I. Core Competencies (9 units)
  • II. Historical and Cultural Foundations (12
    units)
  • III. Disciplinary Learning (27 units)
  • IV. Lifelong Learning (3 units)
  • V. Cultural Diversity (3 units)
  • Not an additional 3 units this category is
    simultaneously satisfied with a course from
    either III or IV.

8
GE Area I Core Competencies
Notice the symbol. These are areas in
which you could have AP credit. See the back of
your GE checklist for a specific list
Critical thinking classes usually require strong
reading and writing skills some students may
want to delay taking a class from this category
until the sophomore year.
9
GE Area II Historical and Cultural Foundations
10
GE Area III A 1 Mathematics
11
GE Area III A 2 Natural Sciences
Notice the symbol. Students thinking
about becoming elementary school teachers are
recommended to take specific courses in these
areas to prepare for the credential program.
Check with a Center for Careers in Teaching
advisor for more information
12
GE Area III B Arts and Humanities
13
GE Area III C Social Sciences
14
GE Area IV Lifelong Learning
  • This area is usually reserved for upper
    division GE, to be taken after the completion of
    your lower division GE
  • You need a total of 9 units of upper division
    GE
  • This is most efficiently completed by taking 3
    units from each of the following GE
    categories
  • III B 3 Implications in the Arts Humanities
  • III C 2 Implications in the Social Sciences
  • IV Lifelong Learning

15
GE Area V Cultural Diversity
  • Cultural Diversity classes are
  • Found in GE categories III B 3, III C 2, and IV
  • Identified by the symbol
  • The only class that may be used to fulfill 2 GE
    categories (Area V and the GE area in which the
    course in listed

16
Basic Rules for General Education
  • 51 units of General Education must include
  • 9 units of upper division (300-400 level) taken
    as a Junior or Senior
  • 3 units of cultural diversity
  • No more than 9 units or 3 courses taken from any
    single department (excluding Category I)
  • No courses taught by your major department in
    Categories III, IV and V

17
Academic Standards for GE Classes
  • Letter grade option is required (A, B, C, D, F)
  • Credit/No Credit (CR/NC) is not allowed for GE or
    major courses
  • A grade of C or better is required in Oral
    Communications, Written Communication, Critical
    Thinking, and Math
  • CSUF uses a /- grading system
  • A grade of C- will NOT satisfy GE requirements in
    Category I (Core Competencies) or III A 1 (Math)
  • A D- is not passing for any course

18
CSUF Bachelors Degree
19
What you will need
  • Orientation Advising packet
  • Advising worksheets (2 pages)
  • Personalized Registration Planner
  • Yellow GE checklist
  • Pencil

20
Step One How many units should I take?
  • What are units?
  • Similar to high school credits, units are a way
    to assign a numerical value to a course
  • Typically, 1 unit 1 hour per week in class
  • Most courses are assigned a value of 3 units,
    meaning that the class meets approximately 3
    hours per week. Some courses are 4 or even 5
    units
  • Activity courses such as bowling or tennis, and
    science lab courses are typically 1 unit

21
Step One, cont.
  • How many units should I take?
  • There is no single right answer for all students
  • Most student find that 15 units (typically 5
    3-unit courses) is reasonable
  • Students in the following circumstances may wish
    to consider a 12-unit schedule
  • Those who work more than 20 hours per week
  • Those who must build their academic skills by
    taking remedial level math and/or English
  • To graduate in 4 years, students must earn at
    least 30 units per year (can include summer)

22
Step One, cont.
  • Based on what you know so far about units and
    graduation requirements, fill in step one on your
    advising worksheet

1
Your first step is to decide how many units you
want to take. This is your decision, but we
recommend 12-15 units (4-5 classes). Twelve
units is considered full time enrollment, and is
recommended for students who are in remedial
classes and/or working more than 20 hours per
week. Other students may find that 15 units is a
good match for them. Remember, you will need to
average 30 units per year in order to graduate in
4 years. How many units do you want to take?
23
Step Two - Mathematics
  • The next step is to choose your math course
  • All freshmen must take math in their first
    semester
  • Math placement is determined by ELM or SAT scores
  • Your scores and placement are listed on your
    registration planner

24
Math placement
Course requires prerequisite. If you are in a
major that requires calculus, and you are
eligible in your first semester, you have a pink
sticker on your Registration Worksheet
25
What is Math 045?
  • Math 045 is a one-week, online, intermediate
    algebra course
  • You can sign up today for one of three summer
    sessions
  • Section 1111 July 5-12
  • Section 1112 July 19-26
  • Section 1113 August 2-9
  • If you are eligible for Math 045, you have a
    green instruction sheet attached to your
    Registration Worksheet. Follow the instructions
    carefully!

26
Math placement
Course requires prerequisite. If you are in a
major that requires calculus, and you are
eligible in your first semester, you have a pink
sticker on your Registration Worksheet
27
Selecting the right math course
Course requires prerequisite. If you are in a
major that requires calculus, and you are
eligible in your first semester, you have a pink
sticker on your Registration Worksheet
28
Step Two
  • Based on what you know about math requirements,
    fill out step two on your Advisement Worksheet

2
MATHEMATICS Ironically, your first two classes
have already been selected for you. First, your
math course is determined by your ELM score, or
your SAT score using the table below SAT Math
550 above, or ELM score 50 above ELM score
36-48 ELM score 32-48 ELM score 0-30 Choose
from Math 110, 115, 120, Choose from Math 045
Math 040 Math 030A then 030B 125, 130, 135,
150A or Math 040 If you are eligible for
college-level math, your major may determine
which math course you should select. Use the
table below to determine which math course is
best for you Biochemistry, Chemistry, Geology,
Math, Physics, Computer Science, Engineering Math
125 Pre-calculus (5 units) Recommended
prep for Math 150A Calculus Biology,
Business Math 115 College Algebra (4
units) Recommended prep for Math 130
Short Course in Calculus Math 135
Business Calculus All other majors Math
110 Liberal Arts Math Math 115 College
Algebra (4 units) Math 120 Statistics
Course has prerequisite. If you are in a major
that requires calculus, and you are eligible to
take calculus in your fist semester, you have a
pink sticker on your Registration
Worksheet. Which math course should you take?
29
Step Three English/Oral Communication
  • The next step is to choose your English or Oral
    Communication course
  • All freshmen must take English or Oral
    Communication in their first semester
  • English/Oral Communication placement is
    determined by EPT or SAT scores
  • Your scores and placement are listed on your
    registration planner

30
English/Oral Comm placement
Health Science and Speech Communication majors
should take HCOM 102 Theatre majors (Acting)
should take THTR 110
31
Step Three
  • Based on what you know about the English/Oral
    Communication requirement, fill in step three of
    your Advisement Worksheet

3
ENGLISH/ORAL COMMUNICATION Next, your English or
Oral Communication class has been determined by
your EPT or SAT score, using the table
below EPT score of 151 above, or SAT verbal
score of 550 above EPT score of 145-150 EPT
score of 133-144 EPT score of 132 below Choose
one Oral Communication English 101 English
099 English 099M Chicano Studies 102 Human
Communication Studies 100 or 102 Theatre
110 Health Science and Speech
Communication majors should take HCOM 102
Theatre majors (Acting) should take THTR 110
Which course should you take?
32
Oral Communications
  • Human Communication 100
  • -Interpersonal Communication
  • Human Communication 102
  • -Public Speaking

33
Step Four Major Courses
  • Some Departments recommend or require that you
    start taking courses in your major in your first
    semester
  • These are majors in which there are several lower
    division requirements (100-200 level courses)
  • Some majors are upper division majors
  • All coursework is at the 300-400 level
  • For these majors, you should focus on General
    Education in your first year

34
Determining Major Courses
  • Use the chart to determine if you should take
    courses in your major this semester

35
Step Four
  • Based on what you know about major courses, fill
    in step four of your Advisement Worksheet now.
  • Questions about specific major requirements will
    be answered in the next session

36
Step Five Other Courses
  • Selecting your other courses requires some more
    thought
  • If you arent required to take courses in your
    major this semester, then you should focus on
    General Education
  • Courses can be chosen from several areas
  • The key is to balance the types of courses you
    take
  • Use the following list to narrow down your
    choices for Fall
  • You will be choosing specific courses during Peer
    Advisement

37
Step Five Choosing GE Courses
  • Choose one subject from each of these GE Areas
    that you MAY want to take in your first semester
  • GE Area II Historical and Cultural Foundations
    (12 units required for graduation)
  • Choose from World History, American History or
    American Government
  • GE Area III A 2 Natural Sciences (6 units
    required for graduation 3 units Physical/Earth
    and 3 units Life, including one lab)
  • Choose from Chemistry, Physics, Geology, or
    Biology
  • GE Area III B 1 2 Introduction to the Arts
    and Humanities (6 units required for graduation -
    3 units Arts and 3 units Humanities)
  • Choose from Art, Music, Dance or Theatre (Arts)
  • Choose from Anthropology, Comparative Religion,
    English/Comparative Literature, Second Language,
    Liberal Studies, Philosophy, or Womens Studies
    (Humanities)
  • GE Area III C 1 Introduction to the Social
    Sciences (3 units required for graduation)
  • Choose from American Studies, Anthropology,
    Economics (not for Business majors), Geography,
    Political Science, Psychology or Sociology

38
Step Six Narrowing Your Choices
  • The last step in this workshop is to narrow your
    choices even further
  • Your schedule should consist of 4-5 courses,
    including Math and English or Oral Communication,
    courses chosen from your major, and GE
  • Use the following samples to help you

39
Step Six Sample Course loads
40
Step Six
  • Based on what you have learned, and the work you
    have done in steps 1-5, fill in step six of your
    Advisement Worksheet
  • Remember, you are only choosing GE subject areas
    now you will choose specific courses later
    today
  • Examples

Psychology Major (13 units) Math 110 English
101 Anthropology (GE Area III B2) American
History (GE Area II)
Biology Major (16 units) Math 125 HCOM 100 (Oral
Comm) Biology 171 (Major) Art (GE Area III B 1)
Undeclared Major (12 units) Math 040 English
099 Music (GE Area III B 1) Geography (GE Area
III C 1)
Art Major (15 units) Math 110 English 099 Art
103 (Major) Art 107A (Major) Political Science
(GE Area II)
Business Major (16 units) Math 115 HCOM 102 (Oral
Comm) World History (GE Area II) Geology (GE Area
III A 2) Music (GE Area III B 1)
41
Checking Your Progress
  • You should check your progress periodically
    throughout your academic career
  • Do this through your Titan Degree Audit (TDA)
  • TDA is an online degree progress check
  • Check your progress on GE requirements, major
    requirements, and units earned
  • Access through Titan Online
  • For faster service at the Academic Advisement
    Center during peak times (during registration),
    bring a current copy of your TDA with you!

42
Whats Next?
  • You should now have a better understanding of
    your General Education requirements, and how to
    choose your classes for Fall
  • Next you will receive advisement from your major
    Department, and Peer Advisement
  • If you have questions, AAC Advisors will be here
    later today to help you
  • If you are eligible, fill out your Finish In Four
    application, and hand it to your NSO Leader or
    AAC intern after Peer Advisement

43
Welcome to Cal State Fullerton!Were proud to
have you as part of the Titan family
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