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Demand for EBooks in an Academic Library

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Brief history of electronic books. Types of e-book models. Usage ... The Internet. Each page looks like the actual printed book ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Demand for EBooks in an Academic Library


1
Demand for E-Books in an Academic Library
  • Ellen Safley
  • University of Texas at Dallas
  • April 2006

2
Quick Survey
  • How many of you have used an electronic book?
  • How many have used a non-fiction electronic book?
  • How many read the same book in print?
  • Would your children have the same answers?

3
Overview
  • Brief history of electronic books
  • Types of e-book models
  • Usage
  • Trends and impact on distance learning

4
Brief History
  • ASCII text online
  • Project Gutenberg
  • Handheld devicesRocket readers
  • The late 1990s
  • Web-based electronic collections
  • By collection, by subscription, by title

5
Portable Readers
  • Add a chip for content
  • OR a self-contained reader
  • Purchased not downloaded
  • Reading onlineback lighting was not great
  • Device was portable

6
The Internet
  • Each page looks like the actual printed book
  • Bibliographic records available for
    titlesloading and quality issues
  • More titles available
  • Have to use a computer
  • Later a PDA

7
Complaints
  • Not as portable
  • Hard to readwho reads a book on a device?
  • Archival issues dealing with collection
    development

8
Usage Studies
  • Mostly analyze NetLibrary collections purchased
    through consortiums or by the library
  • Lack of rigorous statistics except by subject or
    title
  • Libraries showed growing demand for electronic
    books
  • More study needed

9
Other Issues
  • Cites indicate demise of sequential reading
  • Sloppy scholarship
  • E-books show success in delivering reference
    titles
  • Reading devices and electronic ink
  • Still developing a portable device

10
New Technology
  • Microencapsulate electrophoretic displays, aka
    electronic-ink screens
  • Uses millions of white and black capsules
    floating in liquid.
  • Capsules can be arranged using electric charges
    that are flipped as the learner needs to turn a
    page

11
Readers (continued)
  • 2006-2007
  • Four more companies bringing readers to market
  • iRex Technologies (Philips Electronics)
  • Jinke (China)
  • Polymer Vision (Philips spin-off)
  • Plastic Logic (UK)
  • Will use a USB port to add titles from a
    computerany PDF file

12
Thousands of E-Books
  • Finding the Models

13
Experimenting with Electronic Books
  • Wanted to try as many models of electronic books
    as possible to determine which features could be
    useful for research
  • Determine if different subjects were more
    conducive to the transition to e-book models

14
The Environment
15
University of Texas at Dallas
  • Started as a research institution and became a
    part of The University of Texas System in 1969.
  • Until 1975, UTD only offered graduate degrees.
    The university admitted its first freshman class
    of 100 students in 1990.
  • Doctoral/Research UniversityIntensive
  • 14,500 students
  • 30 doctoral programs
  • 40,000 alumni
  • Added millionth volume in September 2004

16
UT-Dallas by School
17
Picking the Models
  • Consortial Deals
  • Subscription Based
  • Individual Purchases
  • Current
  • Historic

18
NetLibrary
  • Consortial purchase with other UT System
    components
  • Selected by a variety of bibliographers
  • NetLibrary complaints
  • Passwords
  • One user
  • One page printing
  • Limited cutting and pasting

19
ebrary
  • Subscription model
  • No selection needed
  • More generous printing, etc.
  • No passwords
  • Supplied bibliographic records have issues
  • Pass off journal issues as e-books

20
Safari Tech Books
  • Excellent match for a technical school
  • Search within books
  • Subscription or slot models
  • Two methods
  • Select slots OR
  • Purchase current and backfile
  • Issues for cataloging

21
History E-Book Project
  • Selected by experts
  • Classics in field
  • Easy navigation
  • Cataloged each record
  • Attached online info to print record
  • Not a huge collection1000 titles

22
EBL
  • Hand picked
  • Good statistical package
  • You buy records from OCLCgood ones!
  • Reserve module
  • Service fee
  • 325 uses each year. When you reach the limit,
    you need another copy

23
Historic
  • A new library would never have these collections
  • No preservation issues
  • If collection is from a microform master, NO
    color
  • Can often download or print entire item
  • Buyer bewaresometimes you supply the development
    money with your purchasenot all available
  • Record issues
  • Included in the purchase?
  • Quality

24
The E-Book Collection
25
The Essentials
  • Always do a trial
  • Cataloging is essential for use
  • Using the collection search engine is great, but
    knowing the individual titles is required
  • Check out if records are available and try to
    broker them as part of the deal…then beware. All
    records are not equal
  • Loading programs are essential for getting print
    with online titles together…we want the two
    formats on the same record
  • Check out the statistical packages

26
Usage
27
Usage
  • Began to look at the usage data in 2002 in
    support of distance learning
  • Cannot distinguish between distance and campus
    learners
  • Literature was indicating little acceptance and
    minimal use of electronic books
  • Always try to look at the documents viewed rather
    than sessions or searches

28
E-Book Usage
  • Measuring
  • Sessions
  • Time
  • Pages viewed, pages printed
  • Views
  • Full-text
  • Accesses
  • Etc., etc., etc.,

29
NetLibrary Usage, 2004-2006
  • Statistics vs. Librarian reactions
  • Over 22,000 uses per year on 37,000 titles.
  • Reactions to NetLibrary by staff are fairly
    negative as they do the troubleshooting for
    passwords, proxy problems, printing issues, and
    readability concerns.

30
NetLibrary Usage, 1999-2005
31
(No Transcript)
32
129 increase
33
Ebrary Usage, July 2004-March 2006
34
88
96
95
93
35
(No Transcript)
36
Comparing ebrary and NetLibrary Strengths and
Weaknesses
  • ebrary
  • Social Sciences 36
  • Science 7
  • Management 30
  • Arts/Humanities 11
  • Brain 2
  • Education 1
  • Engineering 11
  • Other 2
  • NetLibrary
  • Social Sciences 23
  • Sciences 14
  • Management 9
  • Arts/Humanities 17
  • Brain 6
  • Education 1
  • Engineering 25
  • Other 5

Each collection has strengths and weaknesses.
Social Sciences and Management usage is strongest
on ebrary. Engineering/computer science and
Arts/Humanities usage is strongest on NetLibrary
37
Safari Tech Books Usage on 300 books 2004-March
2006
38
Safari Tech Books, 2004-2006 Session Time
Increased 28 in 2005 From 7.45 to 9.54 minutes
39
Use of Reference Electronic Books
  • Oxford English Dictionary
  • 6.6 minutes per session
  • Time is decreasing (20047.56 minutes, 20055.15
    minutes)
  • 3.7 pages per session
  • Use declined 9 in 2005
  • Oxford Reference Online
  • 7 minutes per session
  • Time is decreasing (20047.27 minutes,
    20056.91minutes)
  • 11 pages per session
  • Use increased 155 in 2005

40
Reference E-Books Usage 2004-2005
41
Time Online Varies with Type of E-Book
  • Reference E-Books
  • Increasing in popularity
  • Time online is declining
  • Non-Reference E-Books
  • Increasing in popularity
  • Time online is increasing

42
Historic Titles Use of Eighteenth Century
Collection 2004-2005
1791 increase
43
Early English Books Online, 2004-2005
417 increase in Document/Page Image Views in
2005 Sessions increased 70 in 2005 CATALOGINGUSA
GE
44
Circulation of Print
  • Impossible to compare use of e-books with print
  • How did they use each format?
  • Did they open the book? Checkouts do not always
    equate to use
  • How long are students using each e-book?
  • Reading vs. Factual Information
  • But we know the rate is increasing…how?

45
What We Know
  • We are purchasing over 15,000 new print books per
    year.
  • Print circulation is declining despite new items
    and an increasing enrollment of 3-4 each year.

46
Circulation of Items from the Stacks, 2002-August
2005
19 decline in 2 years
47
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48
Online vs. Print Use
  • Total online use of e-books (by document) was 29
    of print in 2004.
  • Total online use of e-books (by document) was 58
    of print in 2005.
  • Both collections were growing.

49
Impact on Distance Learning
  • Now providing true deliverables for customers
    needing monographs.
  • Usage is exploding--Similar to the e-journal
    usage 5 years ago.
  • Most collections of e-books are searchable within
    the collection and within the volume. Very handy!
  • Are most students now distance learners? They
    are at UT-Dallas. Gate counts ?8/yr

50
Improvements in Usage Stats
  • Must demand change in statistical reporting
    (COUNTER is working on this). What are we
    measuring?
  • Need additional information as to preferences for
    different models and function.

51
Questions?
  • safley_at_utdallas.edu
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