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SQL Server 2005 Business Continuity Measures

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Title: SQL Server 2005 Business Continuity Measures


1
SQL Server 2005 Business Continuity Measures
Practices
  • by
  • Satya Shyam K Jayanty
  • SQL Server MVP
  • www.sqlserver-qa.net
  • sqlmaster_at_sqlserver-qa.net

Lalandia, Denmark - March 09th 2007
2
Topics
  • Introduction
  • Challenges in Disaster Recovery
  • Business Continuity terminology concepts
  • Documenting Disaster Preparedness
  • Training Planning with Change Management.
  • Measuring Metrics - Effectiveness
  • SQL Server 2005 features
  • Best practices Industry standards SQL Server
  • Useful Links
  • Q A

3
Introduction - Speaker
  • Webmaster of www.sqlserver-qa.net
    www.sqloogle.co.uk
  • Been in the IT field over 15 years
  • SQL Server DBA for over 10 years (since ver. 4.2)
  • Contributing Editor, Writer Moderator for
    www.sql-server-performance.com
  • Currently, working full-time as Sr. DBA at a
    large Financial Enterprise focusing on SQL Server
    high availability, clustering, disaster recovery,
    and performance tuning.
  • SQL Server MVP (www.microsoft.com/mvp/)
  • Participation in assorted forums such as MSDN,
    SQL Server magazine, dbforums and so on

4
Challenges in Disaster Recovery
  • Backup of your data how frequently?
  • How much data would you lose in a disaster
    between the backups?
  • When disaster strikes?
  • How quickly you can recover from a disaster?
  • How long would you be without access to
    applications and data?
  • Have you tested Disaster Recovery plan?
  • Disaster Recovery strategy hhmmss.
  • Availability metrics 99.99.

5
Business Continuity terminology concepts
  • No enterprise IT infrastructure is immune from
    the disasters.
  • If the availability is lost then reputation will
    be at stake.
  • Risks
  • Disk Crashes (storage)
  • Power Failures
  • Human Error
  • Natural Disasters
  • Stops the flow of data on IT facilities
  • Unplanned longer outages to the services
  • Recovery
  • Documented recovery plans
  • Restore from last good know backup
  • Are you ready?

6
Business Continuity terminology concepts
  • High Availability Business
    Continuity Disaster Recovery
  • High Availability HA Business Continuity
    BC Disaster Recovery - DR
  • IT Service Management is most important to cover
    range of planning and preparation strategies that
    will define your system design, backups and
    recovery process.
  • High Availability reducing downtime of
    application.
  • Business Continuity forethought to prevent loss
    of operational capability
  • Disaster Recovery process of restoring systems
    to an operational state
  • A process that does not eliminate the causes of
    the events but prevents many effects of the
    events and assures recovery from the disaster.
  • Despite considerable advances in equipment and
    telecommunications design and recovery services,
    IT disaster recovery is becoming increasingly
    challenging.

7
Business Continuity terminology concepts
  • 100 availability means that all users have the
    ability to do all their work, when they want to
    do their work. This is perfect availability.
  • Since 100 availability is virtually impossible,
    high availability (HA) is all that is possible,
    business continuity.
  • The higher you get toward attaining perfect
    availability, the more it costs.
  • With a regular practice the cost will gradually
    decrease in downtime.
  • Your organization must decide for itself how much
    it can afford towards paying for HA.

8
Business Continuity terminology concepts
  • Disaster Recovery plan is referred as Business
    Continuity .
  • A Disaster Recovery business continuity plan
    covers more than just computer systems and data
    at a few physical sites.
  • Critical areas such as employee safety,
    relocation plans, communication systems and
    others are covered in a business continuity plan.
  • Once we look at these impediments to HA, we begin
    our look at the best practices we can implement
    to help ensure HA.

9
Business Continuity terminology concepts
  • Plan
  • A complete business continuity plan should
    account for your employees first and foremost
    with an evacuation plan that ensures everyone's
    safety.
  • Recovery
  • Disaster recovery of systems and data, and all
    other necessities to return to business as usual,
    even in the event that an entire location is not
    accessible.
  • Combination
  • Mixing both Business Continuity Disaster
    Recovery can fetch better results with the help
    of available technology hardware.

10
Business Continuity terminology concepts
  • Changing Times
  • There has been a marked shift in disaster
    recovery from a reactive approach, to a proactive
    approach, which prepares organizations to avoid
    any interruptions and render the smooth
    functioning of their systems.
  • Business continuity essentially brings together
    various planning methodologies, fitting the parts
    together to create a complete plan.
  • Risk management, contingency planning and
    disaster recovery are the major pieces of the
    planner's jigsaw.
  • It is important to choose the tools and
    techniques to react quickly in case of any
    disaster practice makes perfect.

11
Documenting Disaster Preparedness
  • The need for a Disaster Recovery plan- Why you
    are at risk?
  • Natural disasters floods/volcano/earth quake
  • Terrorist atrocities bombings
  • IT Infrastructure virus attacks, blue screen
  • Human errors poor query design, outdated
    statistics
  • Disaster Recovery is nothing but providing
    Business Continuity.
  • What do you think about Disaster Recovery plan
    source?
  • Tape backup
  • Disk backup
  • Offsite backup
  • Disaster Recovery planning is not for later, it
    is for that moment when it strikes to simplify
    process of data recovery within no time.

12
Documenting Disaster Preparedness
  • Getting Started
  • Breaking things down into less formidable steps
    can simplify the process.
  • Important resource to achieve is identifying
    right people.
  • Property can be replaced if damaged, but not
    people (employees).
  • Understand what keeps your business going.
  • Arrangements to store data offsite from live
    location.
  • Calculate the cost of downtime right from 01st
    second.
  • Return of Recovery - RPO RTO are important
    factors.

13
Documenting Disaster Preparedness
  • List of lines
  • The plan should encompass the who/how/where/when
    of "emergency response, back operations and
    post-disaster procedures.
  • Make a note of applications that are important to
    Service Delivery
  • Continue to build and test the plan ongoing
    process
  • Strategy
  • Effective disaster recovery planning requires
    updating hard-copy backup strategies combined
    with continuous data replication.
  • Unfortunately unplanned outages will happen, but
    with a short-term DR planning you can achieve
    long-term solution.

14
Documenting Disaster Preparedness
  • Return of Recovery
  • Recovery Point Objective (RPO)
  • RPO defines the amount of data, in time, which
    your business can afford to lose for a particular
    system for a rapid return of recovery.
  • Non-urgent
  • For instance an application data recovery can be
    achieved from yesterday or even last week may be
    suitable.
  • In this case RPO factor would be days or weeks.
  • Urgent
  • Other applications and data, for which any loss
    is not acceptable.
  • In this case RPO factor would be minutes.

15
Documenting Disaster Preparedness
  • Return of Recovery
  • Recovery Time Objective (RTO)
  • RTO is the amount of time the application can be
    down and not available to users or customers.
  • Can your business survive without a particular
    application for a few minutes?
  • How about a few days?
  • These factors will help to set appropriate
    priorities for recovering systems and data and
    determine the right solution for each.
  • RTO is totally dependant on the RPO factor, most
    efficient factor to choose these 2 options is to
    decide which application is core to your
    Enterprise reputation.

16
Documenting Disaster Preparedness
  • Put into work
  • Testing is equally important to make sure the
    documented plan is working.
  • Improve resiliency against outage to maintain
    user and business productivity.
  • Even the most thorough business continuity plan
    is no substitute for an equally thorough disaster
    recovery plan until it has been implemented.
  • Planning for Disaster Recovery is synonymous with
    contingency planning it is "a plan for backup
    procedures, emergency response and post-disaster
    recovery".

17
Training Planning with Change Management
  • Training Planning
  • Time is precious - creating a BC plan could take
    up to months.
  • A project plan allows for the breakdown of tasks
    into more manageable chunks so that the overall
    project is not as overwhelming.
  • A documented project plan can help to expedite
    the implementation .
  • Then identifying and coordinating correct
    resources would help to pull the power.
  • What can we do differently?
  • Consider your options and be sure to account for
    the protection of your applications and systems
    as well as infrastructure and human resources.
  • Every step in the process of Business Continuity
    must be documented and recorded in a log book.
  • Allocate a resource to manage the process
    efficiently, rotate the same privilege within the
    Service Delivery team for a better practice.

18
Training Planning with Change Management
  • Why don't we achieve what we want to achieve?
  • Lack of Change Management and the end-result of
    this will be
  • do not achieve their objectives, or
  • do not deliver the promised results, or
  • sacrifice the predefined quality, or
  • are not completed in the given time schedule, or
  • use more resources than originally planned.
  • Risk Analysis
  • Originally this factor is not conceived as a
    change management tool.
  • This kind of risk analysis can really help teams
    to get a breakthrough.
  • It helps to identify communication gaps and risks
    that have not been recognized.
  • Testing the businesses continuity and disaster
    recovery plans provides an excellent training
    vehicle for everyone in your company.

19
Measuring Metrics - Effectiveness
  • Ready to get-started
  • A plan is only as good as it is when it is
    executed.
  • Practice makes process perfect
  • Operational Procedures to perform the work
    necessary to conduct business.
  • Controls to ensure that the business is
    conducted as expected.
  • Advancement to higher category to ensure
    operational effectiveness does not decrease as a
    result of changes made. 
  • Removal of redundant controls time to time.
  • The DR plan is a piece of the overall BC plan.

20
Measuring Metrics - Effectiveness
  • It is much better for your business to be
    proactive with its DR plan rather than reactive
    during or after an outage or catastrophe.
  • Roles and Responsibilities
  • The role of DBA is undoubtedly an important one,
    but many DBAs tend to be somewhat blasé about
    backup and recovery.
  • Important to bridge the knowledge gap and provide
    working scenarios, policy/procedure and best
    practice for database backup and recovery.
  • For instance tape-based disaster protection can
    only restore data to the point of the last
    backup, which was most likely the prior night.
  • Consider the facts and figures from RPO RTO.
  • Set appropriate milestones that account for
    delays and setbacks so as not to have to rush to
    meet unrealistic deadlines.

21
SQL Server 2005 features
  • Big new features
  • CLR integration many modern programming
    languages (assemblies)
  • Failover Clustering - during a hardware failure,
    operating system failure, or a planned upgrade.
  • Database mirroring - software solution for
    increasing database availability.
  • Database Snapshots view based reports
  • SQL Server Integration Services (SSIS) - building
    high performance data integration solutions (OLAP
    OLTP)
  • Reporting Services with Report Builder server
    based reporting platform from relational and
    multi-dimensional data sources.
  • Native XML Web services and many more.

22
Best practices Industry standards SQL Server
  • After the initial plan is complete and
    successfully tested, schedule quarterly or
    semi-annual tests.
  • Continuous testing with up to date and
    knowledgeable on the disaster recovery
    procedures.
  • A simple and inexpensive solution to recovering
    from failure is to take backups of all your
    databases.
  • Standby servers are a cost-effective and viable
    way for businesses to maintain SLA and business
    continuity efficiently.

23
Best practices Industry standards SQL Server
  • HIPAA, Sarbanes-Oxley is the most comprehensive
    financial regulatory law in US history.
    Applicable to most of financial organizations for
    their data security configuration.
  • SQL Server 2005 security features Surface Area
    Configuration tool.
  • Do not compromise performance for the sake of DR
    or HA provision, it is also a primary aspect for
    BC.
  • Triggers for Logon Events (New in Service Pack 2)
  • Indexing made easier with SQL Server 2005 DMV
  • Scalable Shared Databases
  • Database Tuning Adivsor

24
Useful Links
  • Business Continuity Plan (template) high level
    plan for DR too.
  • Analyze your business critical systems and
    prioritize the order of restoration.
  • ? Which systems need to be highly available?
    (Minutes)
  • ? Which systems can be out for 24 hours?
  • ? Which systems can be down for a week or more?
  • Identify and rank critical risks in terms of most
    likely to occur
  • ? Power Failure
  • ? Whether related disasters.(Tornadoes,
    Hurricane, Blizzards)
  • ? Environmental related disasters.(Fire ,
    chemical, contamination)
  • Define personnel roles, responsibilities,
    functions and hierarchy
  • Is your data protected?
  • ? High Availability (hardware or application
    redundancy)
  • ? Data redundancy (copy of offsite data)
  • ? Tape restoration (local or remote)
  • Evacuation Plan
  • ? Define Evacuation Routes (contact HR department
    or local fire officials)
  • ? Meeting Location ( where to meet after
    evacuation)
  • ? Accounting for personnel (is everyone out?)
  • ? Post evacuation communication (2-way radio)

25
Useful Links
  • SQL Server 2005 Best Practices Analyzer (February
    2007 CTP) download
  • Choosing a Database for High Availability An
    Analysis of SQL Server and Oracle download
  • How to Attain SQL Server High Availability at
    Minimal Cost download
  • SQL Server Tech-Center on High Availability
    Review
  • SQL Server 2000 High Availability (ISBN
    9780735619203) Book

26
Q A
  • Ill do my best to answer your questions.
  • If you dont get your questions answered today,
    post them at SSP Forums MSDN Forums or view
    Blogs

27
Thank you and have a great day ahead.
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