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pending Your Calorie alary

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Title: pending Your Calorie alary


1
pending Your Calorie alary
Tips for Using the Dietary Guidelines for
Americans 2005 and the MyPyramid
1
2
Alice Henneman, MS, RD University of
NebraskaLincoln Extension http//lancaster.unl.ed
u/food
Beverly A Benes, PhD, RD Assistant
Director Nutrition Services, NE Dept of
Education bev.benes_at_nde.ne.gov http//www.nde.stat
e.ne.us/ns/
Extension is a division of the Institute of
Agriculture and Natural Resources at the
University of Nebraska-Lincoln cooperating with
the counties and the U.S. Department of
Agriculture.
2
3
So what is this integrated food guidance system?
  • How did we get to where we are now? background
    information
  • So what do these tools tell us?
  • essential messages/ concepts
  • Are there foods which are better to eat?
  • spending your Calorie salary
  • Where can we find resources?
  • using consumer materials

3
4
background information
5
Evolution of the USDA Food Guidance System
6
Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005
  • Dietary recommendations for chronic disease
    prevention

7
9 Focus Areas
  • Adequate nutrients within Calorie needs
  • Weight Management
  • Physical Activity
  • Food Groups to Encourage
  • Fats
  • Carbohydrates
  • Sodium and Potassium
  • Alcoholic Beverages
  • Food Safety

8
Guiding Principles
9
History of USDAs Food Guidance
Food for Young Children
1992
1916
1940s
1970s
2005
1950s-1960s
10
--1992-- Food Guide Pyramid
11
--2005-- MyPyramid
12
--2005-- MyPyramid for Kids
13
(No Transcript)
14
2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans encourage
most Americans to
  • eat fewer Calories
  • be more active
  • make wiser food choices
  • USDAS new MyPyramid
  • symbolizes
  • a simple, personalized
  • approach
  • to be active every day
  • to remind consumers
  • to make healthy food
  • choices

15
What does this mean for NSLP? FNS Internal
Working Group…..
  • Currently reviewing and analyzing existing school
    meal patterns and nutrient targets in comparison
    to recommendations of the DGA and DRIs
  • Policy recommendations will be made
  • Rules will be promulgated as necessary

16
essential messages/concepts
17
The Messages in the Anatomy of MyPyramid
  • Variety Physical Activity
  • Proportionality Personalization
  • Moderation Gradual

  • Improvement

http//www.MyPyramid.gov/downloads/MyPyramid_Anato
my.pdf
18
The Messages in MyPyramid Variety
VARIETY
The 6 color bands represent the different food
groups. This illustrates foods from all groups
are needed daily.
19
The Messages in MyPyramid for Kids
  • Every color
  • every day

20
Message Variety
  • In the Dietary Guidelines
  • Consume a variety of nutrient-dense foods and
    beverages within and among the basic food groups.
  • In MyPyramid graphic
  • Color bands represent that
  • all food groups are needed each day for health.

21
The Messages in MyPyramid Proportionality
  • PROPORTIONALITY
  • The different food group bands are shown by
    different widths.
  • The widths are just a general guide to
    proportions.

22
The Messages in MyPyramid for Kids
  • Eat more from some food groups than others

23
Message Proportionality
  • In the Dietary Guidelines
  • Adopt a balanced eating pattern.
  • Sufficient amount of fruits and vegetables,
  • 3 or more ounce equivalents of whole-grain
    products per day
  • 3 cup equivalents per day of fat-free or low-fat
    milk or milk products.
  • In MyPyramid graphic
  • Differing widths of the color
  • bands suggest about how
  • much food should be eaten
  • from each group.

24
The Messages in MyPyramid Moderation
  • Each food group narrows toward the top.
  • The base represents foods with little or no solid
    fats or added sugars, which should be selected
    more often.
  • The narrower top stands for foods containing more
    sugars and solid fats. You can eat more of these
    if youre more active.

25
The Messages in MyPyramid for Kids Moderation
  • Choose healthier foods from each food group

26
Message Moderation
  • In the Dietary Guidelines
  • Limit intake of saturated and trans fats, and
    choose products low in these fats.
  • Make choices of meat, poultry, dry beans, and
    milk products that are lean, low-fat, or
    fat-free.
  • Choose and prepare foods and beverages with
    little added sugars or calorie sweeteners.
  • In MyPyramid graphic
  • Food group bands narrow from
  • bottom to top suggesting to eat
  • nutrient-dense forms of foods.

27
Moderation
apple pie
applesauce
apple
28
Moderation
French fries
Baked potato
29
Moderation
Breaded chicken nuggets
Grilled Chicken breast
30
The Messages in MyPyramid Activity
  • ACTIVITY
  • Represented by the steps and the person climbing
    them.

31
The Messages in MyPyramid for Kids Activity
  • Be physically active every day

32
Message Physical Activity
  • In the Dietary Guidelines
  • Engage in regular physical activity and reduce
    sedentary activities to promote health,
    psychological well-being, and a healthy body
    weight.
  • In MyPyramid graphic
  • Steps and person on them symbolize that physical
    activity should be a part of everyday healthy
    living.

33
The Messages in MyPyramid Personalization
  • PERSONALIZATION
  • The person on the steps, slogan and URL stress
    finding the amount of foods YOU need daily.

MyPyramid.gov
34
The Messages in MyPyramid for Kids
Personalization
  • Make choices that are right for you

35
The Messages in MyPyramid Gradual Improvement
  • GRADUAL IMPROVEMENT
  • The slogan suggests people can take small steps
    to improve diet and lifestyle each day.

36
The Messages in MyPyramid for Kids Gradual
Improvement
  • Take one step at a time

37
Additional Messages in the MyPyramid Graphic To
foster implementation
  • Personalization
  • The name MyPyramid suggests
  • an individual approach.
  • The person climbing the steps mentally links
    each viewer to the image.
  • Gradual Improvement
  • The slogan Steps to a Healthier You suggests
    that improvement should happen in stages, over
    time.

38
spending your Calorie salary (making wiser food
choices)
39
Spending your calorie salary
  • Think of MyPyramid dietary guidelines as a
    calorie salary.
  • Plan calories the same as major expenses a car,
    house, vacation, etc.
  • 5 budgeting steps follow…

40
5 budgeting teps
  • Stay within your budget
  • Consider true cost of poor nutrition
  • Choose the most value for calorie salary
  • Spend on extras after the necessities are
    purchased
  • Plan a budget for YOU

41
tep 1. Stay within your budget
10 pound weight gain per year
100 extra calories per day
42
Examples of 100 calories
  • ? can of a regular soft drink or beer

43
Examples of 100 calories
10 large jelly beans (1 ounce)
44
Learn how much and what to eat for YOUR calorie
level at MyPyramid.gov
Submit age, sex and activity level for a
personalized MyPyramid
45
Calculation results are personalized
More information available
46
Sample meal tracking worksheet 2000 calories
http//www.mypyramid.gov/downloads/worksheets/Work
sheet_2000_18.pdf
47
Balance food calories with physical activity
level
48
Determine Calorie Needs Estimated Energy
Requirements for males
From the National Academy of Sciences, Institute
of Medicine Dietary Reference Intakes
Macronutrient Report
49
Calorie Intake Implications for School Meals
  • Calorie recommendations now based on activity
    level
  • Which activity level should be used to establish
    school meal calories?
  • Sedentary?
  • Moderately active?
  • Active?

50
Physical activity recommended for MOST days of
week
  • Adult recommendations vary by goal
  • Reduce risk of chronic disease 30 minutes of
    moderate intensity
  • Manage weight and prevent weight gain 60 minutes
    of moderate to vigorous activity
  • Sustain a weight loss 60 to 90 minutes of
    moderate to vigorous activity
  • Children and teens 60 minutes

51
Moderate physical activities include
52
Vigorous physical activities include
53
Ways to increase physical activity
  • Walk up and down the soccer or softball field
    sidelines while watching the kids play.

54
Ways to increase physical activity
Ask a friend to go with you.
Replace a coffee break with a brisk walk.
55
Ways to increase physical activity
  • Walk the dog dont just watch the dog walk.

56
Most important have fun while being active!
57
Nebraska YRBS 2003 Physical Activity
35 Participated in insufficient vigorous
physical activity 73 Participated in
insufficient moderate physical activity 51 Were
not enrolled in physical education
class 64 Did not attend physical education
class daily 9 Did not participate in any
vigorous or moderate physical activity
58
5 budgeting teps
  • Stay within your budget
  • Consider true cost of poor nutrition
  • Choose the most value for calorie salary
  • Spend on extras after the necessities are
    purchased
  • Plan a budget for YOU

59
tep 2. Consider true cost of poor nutrition
What about the cost in dollars and cents of
following MyPyramid guidelines?
60
  • Foods that do little to meet nutrient needs
    even if theyre within our calorie salary can
    put our HEALTH and MONEY at risk.

61
  • Each year, over 33 billion in medical costs
    and 9 billion in lost productivity due to heart
    disease, cancer, stroke, and diabetes are
    attributed to diet.

August 2003, http//www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/pe_factshe
ets/pe_pa.htm retrieved 3/5/05
62
Healthy diets may help eliminate cost of
medications for some people
  • Cost of pills/month
  • High cholesterol 95 to 100
  • Diabetes 125 to 150
  • High blood pressure 40 to 50

Costs vary with the type of medication and may
be more or less than these amounts.
63
Importance of total diet
The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension
clinical study (DASH Eating Plan) showed …
  • Fruit and vegetable consumption lowers blood
    pressure …
  • Adding low-fat, high-calcium foods to a diet high
    in fruits and vegetables further lowers blood
    pressure, and …
  • Even greater reductions occur when sodium intake
    is restricted

http//www.5aday.com/html/research/consensus_highl
ights.php
64
5 budgeting teps
  • Stay within your budget
  • Consider true cost of poor nutrition
  • Choose the most value for calorie salary
  • Spend on extras after the necessities are
    purchased
  • Plan a budget for YOU

65
tep 3. Choose the most value for calorie salary
  • A great-looking car with a bad engine offers
    little value if it
  • Wipes out our budget.
  • Doesnt get us where we want to go.

66
Make certain you get enough of these food groups
  • Fruits
  • Vegetables
  • Whole grains
  • Dairy products

http//www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2005/re
commendations.htm
67
Key food group messages from the Dietary
Guidelines and MyPyramid
Focus on fruits.
Vary your veggies.
Get your calcium-rich foods.
Make half your grains whole.
Go lean with protein.
Know the limits on fats, salt, and sugars.
68
(No Transcript)
69
Recommendations 1 2 fruits and vegetables
  • Consume a sufficient amount of fruits and
    vegetables while staying within energy needs.
  • Choose a variety of fruits and vegetables each
    day.

70
Preliminary Data
71
Preliminary Data
72
(No Transcript)
73
Focus on fruits
  • Eat 2 cups of fruits per day (for a 2,000
    calorie diet).
  • Select fresh, frozen, canned, or dried fruit,
    rather than drinking fruit juice, for most of
    your fruit choices.

Note this equivalent ¼ cup dried fruit ½ cup
fruit
http//www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/fruits_counts_tab
le.html
74
Percent of US Children Eating 2 Servings of Fruit
Each Day
Percent
SourceUSDA, 1994-96, 1998
http//www.eatsmartmovemorenc.com/tools/modules/5a
day/5d_presentation.ppt
75
Vary your veggies
  • Eat 2½ cups of raw or cooked vegetables per day
    (for a 2,000 calorie diet).
  • Select from all five vegetable subgroups several
    times a week.

Note this equivalent 2 cups raw leafy greens
1 cup of vegetable
http//www.mypyramid.gov/pyramid/vegetables_counts
_table.html
76
Vegetable Recommendations Compared to Consumption
Amount Avg Amount
Recommended Consumed Category
Females 31-50 Females 31-50 Dark green
3.0 cups 1.0 cups Orange 2.0
cups .7 cups Legumes 3.0 cups
.8 cups Starchy 3.0 cups 3.5
cups Other 6.5 cups 5.5
cups Consumption data is based on NHANES 01-02
data (Females ages 31-50)
77
Percent of Children Eating 3 Servings of
Vegetables Each Day
Percent
SourceUSDA, 1994-96, 1998
http//www.eatsmartmovemorenc.com/tools/modules/5a
day/5d_presentation.ppt
78
Percent of NC High School Students Eating 5-A-Day
Percent
SourceYRBS, 2002
http//www.eatsmartmovemorenc.com/tools/modules/5a
day/5d_presentation.ppt
79
Subgroup 1 Dark green vegetables
  • Broccoli
  • Spinach
  • Most greens spinach, collards, turnip greens,
    kale, beet, mustard greens
  • Green leaf and romaine lettuce

80
Subgroup 2. Orange vegetables
  • Carrots
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Winter squash
  • Pumpkin

81
Subgroup 3. Legumes
  • Dry beans and peas such as
  • Pinto beans
  • Kidney beans
  • Black beans
  • Garbanzo beans (chickpeas)
  • Soybeans
  • Split peas
  • Lentils

MyPyramid includes dry beans, peas and soybeans
in the meats beans group as well as the
vegetable group however, they count for only one
food group at a time.
82
Subgroup 4. Starchy vegetables
  • White potatoes
  • Corn
  • Green peas

83
Subgroup 5. Other vegetables
  • Tomatoes
  • Cabbage
  • Celery
  • Cucumber
  • Onions
  • Peppers
  • Green beans
  • Cauliflower
  • Mushrooms
  • Summer squash

84
  • For optimum health, scientists say eat a
    rainbow of colors. Your plate should look like a
    box of Crayolas.
  • Janice M. Horowitz, TIME, January 12, 2002

85
Recommendation 3 Grains
  • Eat six 1 ounce-equivalents of whole grain
    products daily (for a 2,000 calorie diet)
  • Make at least half of grains whole grain.
  • The rest of grains should come from enriched or
    whole grain products.

86
Grain Recommendations Compared to Consumption
Females 31-50
87
Definition 1 ounce-equivalent
In the grains food group, a 1 ounce-equivalent
is the amount of a food counted as equal to a 1
ounce slice of bread.
  • Equivalents
  • 1 slice bread
  • ½ cup cooked pasta, cooked rice or cooked cereal
  • 1 cup ready-to-eat cereal

88
Definition Whole grains
  • Foods made from the entire grain seed (usually
    called the kernel) which consists of
  • Bran
  • Germ
  • Endosperm
  • If the kernel has been cracked, crushed, or
    flaked, it must retain nearly the same relative
    proportions of bran, germ, and endosperm as
    original grain to be called whole grain.

89
Gains with whole grains
  • Refined grains have been milled the bran
    and germ are removed. This process also removes
    much of the B vitamins, iron, and dietary fiber.
  • …some refined grains are enriched. This means
    certain B vitamins (thiamin, riboflavin, niacin,
    folic acid) and iron are added back after
    processing. Fiber is not added back to most
    enriched grains.

http//www.pueblo.gsa.gov/cic_text/food/grain/trai
n.pdf
90
Examples of whole grains
  • Whole wheat
  • Whole oats/oatmeal
  • Whole grain corn
  • Popcorn
  • Brown wild rice
  • Whole rye
  • Whole grain barley
  • Buckwheat
  • Tritacale
  • Bulgur (cracked wheat)
  • Millet
  • Quinoa
  • Sorghum

http//www.kswheat.com/general.asp?id156
91
Label reading and whole grains
  • Choose foods with a whole grain ingredient listed
    first on the labels ingredient list.
  • Ingredients are listed in descending order of
    weight (from most to least).

92
Which is the whole grain bread?
93
Answer has WHOLE wheat as the first
ingredient!
B
94
Color and whole grains
  • Color is not an indication of a whole grain.
  • Bread can be brown because of molasses or other
    added ingredients.
  • Read the ingredient list to see if grain is a
    WHOLE grain.

NOT whole grain!
Wheat flour, water, high fructose corn syrup,
molasses, wheat bran …
95
Watch wording on grains!
  • Foods are usually not whole grain products if
    labeled with these words
  • Multi-grain
  • Stone-ground
  • 100 wheat
  • Cracked wheat
  • Seven-grain
  • Bran

96
Recommendation 4 Dairy
  • Consume 3 cups per day of fat-free or low-fat
    milk or equivalent milk products
  • For children ages 2 to 8,
  • its 2 cups per day

For information about non-dairy sources of
calcium, see MyPyramid.gov
97
Preliminary Data
98
(No Transcript)
99
Dairy products
  • Equivalents
  • 8 ounces milk (1 cup)
  • 1 cup yogurt
  • 1½ ounces natural or 2 ounces processed cheese

Photo Courtesy of National Dairy Council
100
More for your dollars with dairy!
10 tsps 50g
Average sugar in one 12-ounce non-diet soft drink
(10 teaspoons). Calories 150
101
Considerations Other food groups
102
Go lean for protein
  • Choose lean meats and poultry. Bake it, broil it,
    or grill it. And vary your protein choices with
    more fish, beans, peas, nuts, and seeds.
  • Eat 5½ ounces (or equivalent) of lean meat,
    poultry or fish (for a 2,000 calorie diet).

103
Definition 1 ounce-equivalent
  • In the meat beans group a 1 ounce-equivalent
    is considered the following
  • Equivalents
  • 1 ounce meat, poultry or fish
  • ¼ cup cooked dry beans or peas
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tablespoon peanut butter
  • ½ ounce of nuts or seeds

104
Definition Oils
Oils are fats that are liquid at room
temperature, such as vegetable cooking oils. Oils
come from many different plants and from
fish. Most of the fats you eat should be
polyunsaturated (PUFA) or monounsaturated (MUFA)
fats. Oils are the major source of MUFAs and
PUFAs in the diet. PUFAs contain some fatty acids
that are necessary for healthcalled essential
fatty acids.
105
Oils are in!
  • Because oils contain essential fatty acids, there
    is an allowance for oils in MyPyramid.
  • Recommended intake ranges from 3 teaspoons to 7
    teaspoons daily based on age, sex and level of
    physical activity.

106
Acceptable oils
  • A number of foods are naturally high in oils
  • Nuts Avocados
  • Olives Some fish
  • Foods that are mainly oil, such as mayonnaise,
    certain salad dressings, and soft margarine
    (tub or squeeze) with no trans fats.
  • Common oils such as
  • Canola
  • Corn
  • Cottonseed
  • Olive
  • Safflower
  • Soybean
  • Sunflower
  • Some oils used mainly as flavorings, such as
    walnut oil and sesame oil.

107
MyPyramid homepage
Check here for more information on the food
groups related topics
108
5 budgeting teps
  • Stay within your budget
  • Consider true cost of poor nutrition
  • Choose the most value for calorie salary
  • Spend on extras after the necessities are
    purchased
  • Plan a budget for YOU

109
tep 4. Spend on extras after the necessities
are purchased
  • MORE FUN to buy expensive furniture than spend on
    home maintenance.
  • NOT FUN if house deteriorates over time.

110
Definition Discretionary calories
Depending on the foods you choose, you may be
able to spend more calories than the amount
required to meet your nutrient needs. 
These calories are the extras that can be used
on luxuries like solid fats, added sugars, and
alcohol, or on more food from any food group.
They are your discretionary calories.
111
MyPyramid discretionary calories
112
Recommended foods vs. discretionary calories
  • Recommended foods are
  • Lowest fat form of food
  • No added sugar
  • Discretionary calories may include
  • Higher fat forms of food
  • Foods with added sugar
  • Alcohol (in MODERATION)
  • Increased intake of basic food groups
  • Most solid fats and all added sugar calories are
    discretionary calories

113
Discretionary Calories may be used to
  • Increase amount of food selected from a food
    group
  • Consume foods that are not in the lowest fat
    formsuch as 2 milk or medium-fat meat or items
    that contain added sugars
  • Add oil, fat, or sugar to foods
  • Consume alcohol (for those who consume alcohol)

114
Definition Added sugars
  • Added sugars are sugars and syrups that are
    added to foods during processing or preparation.
  • Added sugars do not include naturally occurring
    sugars such as those which occur in milk and
    fruits.

http//www.mypyramid.gov/downloads/MyPyramid_educa
tion_framework.pdf
115
Alcoholic beverages
  • Those who choose to drink alcoholic beverages
    should do so sensibly and in moderation
    defined as the consumption of up to 1 drink per
    day for women and up to 2 drinks per day for men.
  • 1 drink
  • 12 ounces regular …beer
  • 5 ounces wine
  • 1.5 ounces 80-proof distilled spirits

1.5 ounces
116
  • For many people, the discretionary calorie
    allowance is totally used by the foods they
    choose in each food group, such as higher fat
    forms of foods or sweetened products.  

117
Nutrients of concern for
  • Children and
  • Adolescents
  • Calcium
  • Potassium
  • Fiber
  • Magnesium
  • Vitamin E
  • Adults
  • Calcium
  • Potassium
  • Fiber
  • Magnesium
  • Vitamin E
  • Vitamin A (as carotenoids)
  • Vitamin C

118
Summary of Implications for School Meals
  • More
  • Dark green veggies
  • Orange veggies
  • Legumes
  • Fruits
  • Whole grains
  • Low-fat milk and milk products
  • Less
  • Refined grains
  • Total fats
  • Cholesterol
  • Saturated fats
  • Trans fats
  • Added sugars
  • sodium

119
5 budgeting teps
  • Stay within your budget
  • Consider true cost of poor nutrition
  • Choose the most value for calorie salary
  • Spend on extras after the necessities are
    purchased
  • Plan a budget for YOU

120
tep 5. Plan a budget for YOU
121
  • Fine-tune what youre already eating to meet
    MyPyramid guidelines

122
As you budget, choose foods that taste good as
well as are good for you!
  • What some call health, if purchased by
    perpetual anxiety about diet, isn't much better
    than tedious disease.
  • George Dennison Prentice

123
Spend your calorie salary wisely
  • Eating right is vital to promoting health and
    reducing the risk for death or disability due to
    chronic diseases such as heart disease, certain
    cancers, diabetes, stroke, and osteoporosis.
  • Remember ….

Source http//www.healthierus.gov/nutrition.html

124
  • Money is the most envied, but the least enjoyed.
  • Health is the most enjoyed, but the least
    envied.
  • Charles Caleb Colton

125
  • Our health always seems much more valuable
    after we lose it.
  • Author unknown

126
  • The first wealth is health.
  • Ralph Waldo Emerson

127
…..final words
I am hoping that in our quest to find all the
answers to wellness policies and healthier food
items we wont lose our reason for being in
SCHOOL food service to begin with. Those of us
on the front lines are a very major part of the
nurturers in the school world. Food and comfort
are supposed to go together. The warm meals, the
kind words, the smile on a cold dreary
day….. …..We have to feed children on a budget
that is unbelievable, yet we do it. We have to
run a business with no say as to how much to
charge. We have to follow guidelines and make it
work AND we HAVE to take care of the
children!…. I just hope that never has to change
for us to be too busy, stressed, …to be there for
the children.
with
permission from Teri Davis,
Mealtalk listserv
128
Finally …
  • If you dont take care of your body, where are
    you going to live?
  • Author unknown

The End
129
Thank you!!!
Beverly A Benes, PhD, RD Assistant
Director Nutrition Services, NE Dept of
Education bev.benes_at_nde.ne.gov http//www.nde.stat
e.ne.us/ns/
http//www.nde.state.ne.us/NS/slide_shows.htm
130
using consumer materials
131
For more information
  • MyPyramid.gov http//www.mypyramid.gov
  • Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2005
    http//www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2005/do
    cument

This PowerPoint is a modification of the
PowerPoint available as a FREE download on the
Internet at http//lancaster.unl.edu/food/mypyrami
d-calorie-salary.htm
132
Consumer materials
  • Graphic image and slogan
  • Poster
  • Mini Poster
  • Website
  • MyPyramid.gov
  • MyPyramid Plan
  • MyPyramid Tracker
  • Inside MyPyramid
  • In development
  • Kids materials
  • Spanish version

133
  • Schools can receive an introductory MyPyramid
    packet, including
  • one full-size poster
  • one tear-pad of 50 MyPyramid mini-posters
  • one Anatomy of MyPyramid handout
  • To receive this packet
  • Send your name, mailing address, and request to
    publication_at_cnpp.usda.gov
  • Bulk copies can be purchased either through the
    - Government Printing Office http//bookstore.a
    po.gov 1-866-512-1800 or,
  • Purdue University Press
  • media.order_at_purdue.edu 1-888-398-4636

134
Classroom Materials
  • Introduce MyPyramid concepts
  • Developed for 3 grade levels
  • Level 1 (grades 1 2)
  • Level 2 (grades 3 4)
  • Level 3 (grades 5 6)

http//mypyramid.gov/kids/index.html
135
Lesson Components
  • Snapshot of lessons
  • Topic
  • Objective
  • Individual activity
  • Group activity
  • Lunchroom link

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http//mypyramid.gov/kids/kids_game.html
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MyPyramid Tracker
  • A tool for those desiring a more advanced
    analysis of their food intake and physical
    activity

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