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PEERS 2006

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Rhonda Rank. Angie Shellabarger. Differentiated Instruction. Reading in the Content Areas ... Changing the pace, level, or form of instruction in order to meet ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: PEERS 2006


1
PEERS 2006
  • Lincolnview High School
  • Nancy Hennel
  • Dave Evans
  • Hollie Gleason
  • Greg Leeth
  • Adam Owens
  • Rhonda Rank
  • Angie Shellabarger

2
Differentiated Instruction
  • Reading in the Content Areas

3
What is differentiated instruction?
  • A teaching philosophy based on meeting the needs
    of the diverse learner
  • Changing the pace, level, or form of instruction
    in order to meet the needs of the individual
    learners

4
Why should teachers differentiate instruction?
  • To appeal to multiple intelligence
  • To increase student understanding
  • To increase student achievement
  • To motivate students

5
Strategies to diversify reading instruction
  • Prereading
  • Students use before they begin to read.
  • During Reading
  • Students interact with text as they read.
  • After Reading
  • Students reflect on, apply, and even act out
    learned materials.

6
Prereading Strategy
  • Informs teachers of students previous knowledge.
  • Prepares students for reading assignment.
  • Motivates students to read.

7
Examples of Prereading Strategies
  • Word Association
  • Anticipation Guides

8
Word Association
  • Measures prior knowledge of topic.
  • Similar to brainstorming.

9
Word Association How to implement
  • Teacher chooses a word.
  • Students make associations with the word based on
    prior knowledge.
  • Students should avoid subordinate ideas
    associated with the word.

10
Anticipation Guide
  • Fosters prior knowledge.
  • Focuses interests in topic.
  • Motivates readers.
  • Sets a purpose for reading.
  • Encourages readers to respond without fear of
    being wrong.

11
Anticipation Guide How to implement
  • Teacher identifies concepts that may challenge
    students beliefs.
  • Teacher must choose statements that stimulate
    thinking.
  • Students need to respond to statements.
  • Discuss statements so students justify responses.

12
During Reading Strategy
  • Engages readers with the text as they read.
  • Promotes active reading.

13
Examples of During Reading Strategies
  • Note Taking
  • Study Guides

14
Note Taking
  • Teacher develops structured notes so students
    avoid information overload.

15
Note Taking How to implement
  • Students need to identify the important ideas.
  • Read text.
  • Identify important concepts.
  • Rewrite important ideas.

16
Study Guide
  • Students record important information as they
    read.
  • Promotes active reading.

17
Study Guide How to implement
  • Teacher develop guides that focus students
    attention to main concepts.
  • Students complete.

18
After Reading Strategy
  • Encourages students to reflect on and apply
    material.
  • Needs to be varied.
  • Helps students comprehend and interact with
    material.

19
Examples of After Reading Strategies
  • Cubing
  • Socratic Questioning

20
Cubing
  • Encourages students to view material in various
    forms.
  • Fosters speaking and writing skills.
  • Can improve reading comprehension.

21
Cubing How to implement
  • Teacher introduces topic.
  • Students consider cube.
  • Student writes or speaks about topic from one of
    the six aspects.

22
Socratic Questioning
  • Encourages students to utilize listening and
    speaking skills.
  • Encourages delving and exploration into personal
    beliefs.
  • Students learn to think for themselves.

23
Socratic Questioning How to implement
  • Students read text.
  • Class discussion begins with a question that has
    no correct answer.
  • What reasons do you have for saying that?
  • So, you see it has…?
  • Are you suggesting…?
  • Couldnt it also be…?

24
Why should you implement reading strategies?
  • Motivate the students.
  • Promote life-long learning.
  • Increase achievement scores.
  • Become a better teacher!
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