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Ethics, Technology

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Title: Ethics, Technology


1
Ethics, Technology Buddhism
2
Buddhism
  • How are the Ethical Norms characteristic of
    Buddhism similar to other religions?
  • Harmonious relations between people
  • Compassionate care for other beings
  • Self restraint
  • Economic justice
  • Non-violence

3
Buddhism
  • How are the Ethical Norms of Buddhism different
    than other religions?
  • No supreme authority
  • Radical relativity
  • Interdependence of phenomena
  • Dependant co-arising
  • Everything arises and ceases in continuous flux

4
Buddhism
  • How are the Ethical Norms of Buddhism different
    than other religions?
  • To understand the notion of dependant co-arising
    and and interdependence of phenomena one must
    think of everything in endless flux. To have
    this understanding is to experience wisdom and
    to the extent one is grounded in this
    awareness, ethical behavior (silla) arises
    effortlessly.
  • Example Wisdom and Silla (like two hands washing
    each other) ethical behavior informs wisdom and
    wisdom informs ethical behavior.

5
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6
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7
Buddhism
  • Characteristics of Power provide information
    about the underlying worldview

8
Buddhism
  • What are the characteristics of power in the
    West?
  • Power has metaphysical and epistemological roots.
    Our unexamined assumptions or story about the
    structure of reality determines how we will view
    power.

9
Buddhism
  • What are the characteristics of power in the
    West?
  • Story that the world is made of stuff
  • Separate, autonomous or independent things
  • Power is about keeping ourselves separate
  • What these separate things can do to each other?
  • Exert our will to control the stuff
  • Win or loose it
  • Power becomes domination and subordination of
    will and control over something

10
Buddhism
  • Western Notion of Power
  • Power over… property or others (something you
    can win or loose) giving rise to

11
Buddhism
  • Western Notion of Power
  • Separate sense of self exacerbates Western
    cultures anxiety, depression and sense of
    isolation.

12
Buddhism
  • Western Notion of Power
  • This sense of separate things that can assert
    power over other
  • Defenses
  • keep things unchangeable (I am so powerful I
    will not change my mindand invulnerable)
  • Win-loose mentality-Remember Bateson..hubris
  • Fear (life forms need defenses but if you want
    something to grow those same defenses need to be
    able to break apart) (US most powerful nation,
    spends the most on defenses to make us
    invulnerable)
  • Axiomatic but not a logical connection

13
Buddhism
  • What are the characteristics of power in Buddhist
    culture?
  • Experience ourselves as inter-connected whole, in
    flux and flows revealing patterns that
    self-organize
  • Different notion of power

Power with
14
Buddhism
  • Buddhist Notion of Power with
  • Power is an emergent phenomena (property) that
    arises as we act together
  • Power results from synergy
  • Connectivity results in power

15
Buddhism
Fundamental Assumption is Buddhism relates to the
notion of Suffering
  • Suffering stems from power over lack of
    wisdom (cant see interconnectivity)
  • Three Poisons (opposite of the three virtues)
  • Delusion-Seeing ourselves as separate (ignorance)
    is thinking that you are separate (from web of
    life
  • see the parts and cant see the wholemutually
    reinforcing mistake about life
  • Aversion-Keeping ourselves defended, separate
    gives rise to hatred
  • Greed-Craving things for ourselves alone at the
    expense of others
  • Gives rise to need to hold on to whats mine

16
Buddhism
Fundamental Assumption is Buddhism relates to the
notion 0f Suffering
  • Suffering stems from power over lack of
    wisdom (cant see interconnectivity)
  • Wisdom is gained by the experience of the
    following of inter-connectivity and radical
    relativity through meditation
  • Annata-no-self
  • Annica-everything is constantly changing

17
Buddhism
  • Biology and system thinking changed the lens with
    which we see reality. Instead of seeing things as
    separate we now began to see things as flows of
    matter and energy and information and what
    appeared to be separate entities we began to see
    as nodes and patterns that self organize thanks
    to these flows.
  • Open systems because they sustain themselves
    through the flow of matter, energy and
    information.
  • Systems thinkers fascinated analyzing the
    principles and properties by which the flows
    generated these open systems.
  • Example of the neural net

18
Buddhism
  • Four Noble Truths
  • Life is suffering (dukkha) or out of joint
  • Cause of Dukkha is desire for private
    fulfillment---craving and aversion
  • There is a means by which such a resolution is
    possible overcoming craving and aversion gives
    rise to freedom from suffering
  • 8 fold path leads to this freedom

19
Buddhism
  • Eight Fold Path suggest a way to behave that
    provide the optimal conditions to shift our
    thinking and resolve the Four Noble Truths.

20
Buddhism
  • Sangha
  • Radical inter-connectivity
  • Power with…
  • Sharing
  • Fundamental generosity-making sure everyone has
    enough

21
Buddhism
  • The means by which such a resolution is possible
    is found in the practice of the Eight Fold
    Pathwe can dissolve the patterns of conditioning
    that bring about suffering by developing right
    view, right intention, right speech, right
    action, right livelihood, right effort, right
    mindfulness, and right concentration. This is not
    to be accepted passively, but with insight…and it
    requires training--training for life.
  • In sum, the root of Buddhism lies in developing
    skillful insight into the interdependent
    origination of all things, and through this,
    redirecting the movement of our situation from
    cycles of chronic trouble and suffering toward
    release from those cycles.

22
Buddhism
  • Eight fold path designed to release the
    individual from ignorance, unwitting impulse, and
    the drive for private fulfillment.
  • Right view-the intellectual viewpoint necessary
    to embark on this path and a belief in the basic
    map and understanding of it.
  • Right intention--The intention to be
    single-minded in ones pursuit.
  • Right speech--Attention to language--avoiding
    uncharitable, false or unkind speech, and
    avoiding speech which thickens the ego such as
    rationalizations because we are afraid of
    revealing ourselves.
  • Right action--Reflect on ones action with an eye
    on ones motive. How much generosity is involved
    and how much self-seeking. One moves from
    selfishness toward charity with the Buddhas
    version of 10 Commandments such as do not steal,
    do not kill, do not lie, do not be unchaste, do
    not drink to point of intoxication.
  • Right livelihood--Our work will influence our
    progress on the path therefore any work which
    isnt in alignment is to be avoided.
  • Right effort--Steady effort.
  • Right mindfulness--Continuous self-examination,
    and.
  • Right concentration.

23
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