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Data Resource Center on Child and Adolescent Health Maximizing the use of the new national surveys o

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... of the Champions for Progress Center at UT State University ... Maximum: 64.4% in South Dakota. 32 states were above 55% Starting Point Candidate Indicators ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Data Resource Center on Child and Adolescent Health Maximizing the use of the new national surveys o


1
Data Resource Center on Child and Adolescent
HealthMaximizing the use of the new national
surveys of child and adolescent health and health
careEvery State and Family Child Health Leader
Deserves a Data Home AMCHP Annual
ConferenceFebruary 19, 2005 Dana Zive, MPH -
CAHMI and Oregon Health Science UniversityNora
Wells, MSEd - Family Voices
2
What is the Data Resource Center?
  • A website that delivers hands-on, user-friendly
    access to national, state and regional data from
    the 2001 National Survey of Children with
    Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN) and the 2003
    National Survey of Childrens Health (NS-CH)
  • A technical assistance resource
  • email and telephone assistance
  • hot topic e-updates
  • in-person, telephone and online workshops
  • Online educational materials, examples of data
    use by states and links to related websites

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What are the goals for the Data Resource Center?
  • Provide centralized and user-friendly access to
    standardized national survey findings
  • Build common knowledge, capacity and passion for
    using data to stimulate and inform system change
    locally and nationally

5
Who are we?
  • The Child and Adolescent Health Measurement
    Initiative staff
  • Family Voices staff and family leaders advisory
    group
  • Technical Advisory Committee

6
Who else do you need to know about?
  • The Data Resource Center is one of several
    efforts coordinated under the rubric of the
    Champions for Progress Center at UT State
    University
  • You! State and Family advisory committees
    provide ongoing and essential input and guidance!
  • Our sponsor! The Maternal and Child Health
    Bureau, Health Resources and Services
    Administration

7
Where is the Data Resource Center?
  • Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent
    Health
  • www.childhealthdata.org
  • National Survey of Children with Special Health
    Care Needs
  • www.cshcndata.org
  • National Survey of Childrens Health
  • www.nschdata.org

8
What do state and family leaders say they need to
use data from the national surveys effectively?
  • Easy access to the datadata already merged,
    cleaned, preconstruction of complex variables and
    weighting for complex sampling
  • Specific knowledge of the survey questions asked
    and construction of indicator variables
  • Technical help in interpreting and using the data
  • Opportunities to learn from and share with other
    state and family leaders using data
  • Opportunities to partner with other stakeholders
    to discuss, interpret and act on the data
    findings
  • Concrete examples of potential uses and models of
    how data can be used

9
What can you do?
  • Access information about children, youth and
    their families
  • Search and compare national, state, and regional
    survey results
  • Learn to use data more effectively
  • Discover how other state and family leaders are
    using these findings
  • Get expert help by e-mailing us your questions,
    plus get links to other data sets and resources

10
Additional ways data might be used
  • Educating Policymakers
  • What are key policy issues for your state ?
  • What programs need what information?
  • What data could help them learn about child
    health needs?
  • Advocacy
  • Are there key pressure points in program budgets
    or priorities coming up?
  • What methods would be most effective in
    presenting your case?
  • How could you use data in Fact Sheets, Testimony,
    the media, along with family stories?
  • Grant Writing
  • How can you use data to strengthen your proposal?

11
Thinking about ways data could be used in your
state
  • Identifying/documenting needs
  • How many children in your state have what needs?
  • How does data support what youre hearing from
    the field (providers, families, other agencies)?
  • Building partnerships
  • What partners could use this data Public
    Programs, Health plans, Hospitals, Providers,
    community groups, faith based organizations?
  • How can you share data to support common efforts,
    improve care?

12
National Survey of Children with Special Health
Care Needs
  • Conducted for the first time during 2000 2001
  • Random-digit dial telephone survey administered
    in 12 languages
  • Uses SLAITS (State Local Area Integrated
    Telephone Survey) sampling mechanism
  • Sponsored by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau
  • National Center for Health Statistics of the CDC
    oversees sampling and administration

13
Purpose
  • To provide national and state estimates for the
    numbers of CSHCN in the population
  •  
  • To provide national and state baseline measures
    to compare with future survey results over time
  •  
  • To provide information for the Title V Block
    Grant needs assessment states are required to
    conduct every five years
  •  
  • To provide state-level information about
    insurance status for all children
  •  
  • To provide information about CSHCN and their
    families to help guide policy makers, advocates,
    and researchers
  •  

14
National Survey of CSHCN
15
In-depth CSHCN interview collects information on
  • Child health and functional status
  • Child health insurance status and adequacy of
    coverage
  • Access to health care including amounts and
    types of health care services used by child and
    any unmet needs for services
  • Care coordination
  • Family-centeredness of childs health care
  • Impact of childs health on family

16
NSCH Survey Domains
Child Characteristics
Child Outcomes
Family Level Influences
Neighborhood and Community Influences
17
Unique Features of the NSCH
  • Comprehensive detailed snapshot
  • Child family neighborhood
  • Contains a variety of positive indicators to
    track youth development
  • family strengths
  • family relationships and behavior
  • family processes
  • household routines

18
National Survey of Childrens Health
  • 102,353 completed interviews
  • Minimum 1,483 in Utah
  • Maximum 2,241 in Louisiana and Ohio
  • 25 states have more than 2,000 each
  • Overall response rate 55.3
  • Minimum 49.6 in New Jersey
  • Maximum 64.4 in South Dakota
  • 32 states were above 55

19
Starting Point Candidate Indicators
  • Eight Categories of Indicators
  • Category 1 Physical and Dental Health (10
    indicators)
  • Category 2 Emotional, Developmental and Mental
    Health and Well-Being (9)
  • Category 3 Health Insurance Coverage (3)
  • Category 4 Access to Care and Services (7)
  • Category 5 Health Care System/Medical Home (7)
  • Category 6 Child and Youth Activity and Success
    in School (10)
  • Category 7 Family and Home Activities, Safety
    and Well-Being (9)
  • Category 8 Neighborhood Safety and Support (3)

20
Starting Point Candidate Indicators
  • Category 1 Physical and Dental Health (10
    indicators)
  • 1.1 Overall child health status
  • 1.2 Healthy teeth
  • 1.3 Healthy weight
  • 1.4 Child impacted by asthma
  • 1.5 Child impact by ADD/ADHD
  • 1.6 Hospitalization for asthma
  • 1.7 Overall impact on child
  • 1.8 Overall impact on family
  • 1.9 Lost school days
  • 1.10 Child injury

21
Starting Point Candidate Indicators
  • Category 2 Emotional, Developmental and Mental
    Health and Well-Being (9)
  • 2.1 Parent perceived emotional, mental or
    behavior problem
  • 2.2 Breastfeeding
  • 2.3 Risk for developmental delay
  • 2.4 Parent concerns (0-5)
  • 2.5 Asked about concerns (0-5)
  • 2.6 Getting needed information (0-5)
  • 2.7 Problems with Social Competence (6-17)
  • 2.8 Problems with Social Behaviors (6-17)
  • 2.9 Parent concerns (6-17)

22
Starting Point Candidate Indicators
  • Category 3 Health Insurance Coverage (3)
  • 3.1 Currently insured
  • 3.2          Type of insurance
  • 3.3          Coverage consistency

23
Starting Point Candidate Indicators
  • Category 4 Access to Care and Services (7)
  • 4.1 Preventive and dental care
  • 4.2         Health service needs met
  • 4.3         Mental health care
  • 4.4         Medical care
  • 4.5         Dental care
  • 4.6         Prescription medication
  • 4.7 Emergency care

24
Starting Point Candidate Indicators
  • Category 5 Health Care System/Medical Home (7)
  • 5.1 Personal doctor or nurse
  • 5.2 Communication and cultural sensitivity
  • 5.3 Getting care quickly
  • 5.4 Preventive care
  • 5.5 Access to specialized services
  • 5.6 Care coordination
  • 5.7 Medical home index

25
Starting Point Candidate Indicators
  • Category 6 Child and Youth Activity and Success
    in School (10)
  • 6.1 Out of school activities (6-17)
  • 6.2 Regular exercise (6-17)
  • 6.3 Work for pay (12-17)
  • 6.4 Early childhood school (3-5)
  • 6.5 Religious services
  • 6.6 Volunteer activities (12-17)
  • 6.7 Reading for pleasure (6-17)
  • 6.8 Reading to young children (0-5)
  • 6.9 TV watching (6-17)
  • 6.10 Repetition of grade (6-17)

26
Starting Point Candidate Indicators
  • Category 7 Family and Home Activities, Safety
    and Well-Being (9)
  • 7.1 Sufficient sleep
  • 7.2 Family outings
  • 7.3 Family parenting stress
  • 7.4 Family conflict resolution
  • 7.5 Home alone (6-11)
  • 7.6 Non-parental care (0-5)
  • 7.7 Household smoking
  • 7.8 Poor households
  • 7.9 Shared meals

27
Starting Point Candidate Indicators
  • Category 8 Neighborhood Safety and Support (3)
  • 8.1 Child Supportive neighborhoods
  • 8.2 Safety of child
  • 8.3 Availability of child care

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  • Data Search Recipe
  • Step 1 Search the Data
  • Step 2 Understand Your Findings
  • Step 3 Tell Your Story

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Data Search RECIPE
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The Data Resource Center can help!
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Please visit us!
  • National Survey of Children with Special Health
    Care Needs
  • www.cshcndata.org
  • National Survey of Childrens Health
    www.nschdata.org
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