Basic Skills and Career - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Basic Skills and Career PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 1d5842-ZjRjZ



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Basic Skills and Career

Description:

Basic Skills and Career – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:285
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 128
Provided by: linmar3
Learn more at: http://www.cccbsi.org
Category:
Tags: basic | bocce | career | skills

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Basic Skills and Career


1
Basic Skills and Career Technical Education
(CTE)
  • Lin Marelick, CTL Grant Coordinator
  • Doug Marriott, CCAA DirectorDeborah Harrington,
    Dean of Student Success, LA District, BSI Phase
    IV Director
  • March 11 12, 2009
  • Sheraton Hotel, Universal City, CA

2
http//www.youtube.com/watch?vljbI-363A2Q
3
Agenda, Day 1
  • March 11, 10 a.m.- Noon
  • Introductions
  • Outcomes for the workshop
  • Who are the students with basic skills needs? BSI
    Handbook Chapter 1
  • Myths Misconceptions about students w/ basic
    skills needs.
  • What are the basic skills that students need? BSI
    Handbook Chapter 13
  • Changing the dialogue at your college.
  • Lunch Break

4
Agenda Contd
  • BSI Handbook Chapter 5 Best Practices in
    teaching basic skills
  • California Career Advancement Academies Video
    including the student voice
  • Dr. Arora, Instructor, LA Valley College
  • Discussion What opportunities barriers do you
    foresee to implementing a CTL program at your
    college? How do you get college buy-in?
  • What do our students need from us to be
    successful? Assessment vs. evaluation

5
Outcomes
  • Understand how to collaborate with CTE or basic
    skills colleagues to develop contextualized
    teaching and learning (CTL) for CTE programs
  • Learn strategies for engaging students with basic
    skills needs in the classroom
  • Develop strategies for ongoing CTL discussions at
    your home campus
  • Increase communication with CTE and basic skills
    colleagues from other colleges
  • Increase awareness of projects that connect basic
    skills, CTE, and workforce development

6
Introductions
  • Description of the exercise
  • Meet and greet- introduce yourself to as many
    people in the room as possible (minimum of five
    people). Ask the following name, college, why
    are you here? (short answers please)
  • Introduce a person you met to the rest of the
    group

7
(No Transcript)
8
BSI HandbookChapters 1 13
  • Who are the students with basic skills needs?
  • What are the basic skills that students need to
    be successful in class or on the job?

Speaking English
Reading and Writing in English
Basic Arithmetic or Higher Math Skills
Employability or Soft Skills
9
Basic Skills CTE
  • Misconceptions Quiz- decide if the statements
    below are True or False
  • Students dont need reading or math to be
    successful in CTE programs because they need very
    discrete skills for specific occupational roles.
  • The majority of students who get their GED
    continue on to higher levels of education and/or
    occupational training.
  • The only way CTE students with basic skills needs
    can improve those skills is to enroll in a basic
    skills course.

10
How do we best reach teach students with basic
skills needs?A Few StrategiesDirected
Learning ActivitiesLearning CommunitiesContextua
lized Courses
11
Directed Learning Activities
  • Which statement is untrue about Directed Learning
    Activities?
  • Directed Learning Activities incorporate tutorial
    centers to address basic skills needs.
  • Apportionment funding in the form of hours by
    arrangement can be legitimately collected for
    directed learning activities.
  • The goal of the directed learning activity is the
    completion of exercises.
  • The language of the activity clearly connects to
    the course assignments, objectives and/or
    outcomes.

12
Learning Communities
  • Which statement is true about learning
    communities?
  • Learning communities reach across a limited
    number of disciplines
  • Learning communities are classes that are linked
    or clustered during an academic term and enroll a
    common cohort of students.
  • The faculty member is the center of activity in a
    learning community
  • Learning communities are not as effective for
    developmental learners community.

13
Contextualized Lessons
  • Which statements below are true about
    contextualized lessons?
  • In contextualized instruction
  • skills are taught in the context of what is
    required and relevant for industry.
  • skills are taught in the context of what is
    relevant for general life and survival skills.
  • skills are taught in the context of what is
    meaningful and relevant to previous knowledge or
    experience.
  • The best way to learn something is in context.
  • All of the above answers are correct.

14
Myths Misconceptions
  • Discussion
  • What myths misconceptions do you know of or
    anticipate from faculty and administrators at
    your college who did not attend this workshop?
  • Groups report out

15
Changing the dialogue
Partner Activity- Doug Marriott How do you
change the dialogue at your college in regards to
basic skills instruction and contextualized
teaching and learning? Have some fun with the
sample dialogue OR create your own Exercise
description Role play with the scripts that are
on the table. Reverse roles and practice the
dialogue again.
16
LUNCH BREAK1200 1245 pm
17
Best practices in teaching basic skills
Reshaping student pre-conceptions or
misconceptions Mastering content specific
information (transfer of learning) Active
Learning when students are active in their own
learning, they are able to organize information
and retrieve it, i.e., KWL Deep learning
linking knowledge to a scaffold of previous
knowledge Assess, assess, assess assessment, the
learning tool Metacognition- students are
conscious and attentive to their own learning
strategies Student self-assessment students
analyze their own learning
18
Assessment v. Evaluation (whats the
difference?)Assessment Tools for measuring
progress toward and achievement of the learning
goals. The goal is to improve performance using
feedback. (Pre and post measurements.)Evaluation
The process of analyzing the results of
assessment and determining whether the goals have
been achieved. (Ongoing introspection of the
process.)Sample Rubrics
19
California Career Advancement Academies
Video The Student VoiceHow do we ensure that
the student voice is included in our
programs? Doug Marriott
20
CAREER ADVANCEMENT ACADEMY
  • Project Introduction / Overview

Funded in part by the Chancellors Office,
California Community Colleges
21
CAREER ADVANCEMENT ACADEMY
  • Project Background
  • Needs, Goals, Services, Outcomes
  • ? Project Partners
  • ? Opportunities

Funded in part by the Chancellors Office,
California Community Colleges
22
CAREER ADVANCEMENT ACADEMY
  • Needs
  • 1) 93,013 young adults (ages 16-24) are
    undereducated
  • and unemployed - - disconnected
  • - - One out of Five Out of School and
    Out of Work Youth in Los Angeles and
    Long Beach
  • 2) Shortage of capable and pretrained healthcare
    workers for industry
  • (LVNs, radiology technicians, medical record
    coders, psychiatric technicians,
    phlebotomists, respiratory therapists, related
    healthcare professions)

Funded in part by the Chancellors Office,
California Community Colleges
23
CAREER ADVANCEMENT ACADEMY
Funded in part by the Chancellors Office,
California Community Colleges
24
CAREER ADVANCEMENT ACADEMY
Funded in part by the Chancellors Office,
California Community Colleges
25
LOS ANGELES COUNTY 2007
CAREER ADVANCEMENT ACADEMY
Funded in part by the Chancellors Office,
California Community Colleges
26
CAREER ADVANCEMENT ACADEMY
  • Occupations With the Fastest Job GrowthLos
    Angeles County2004 and Projected 2014
  • Dental Hygienists 46
  • Dental Assistants 45.7
  • Network Systems and 45.6
  • Data Communications Analysts
  • Medical Assistant 44.2
  • Physicians Assistants 42.1
  • Physical Therapy 38.9
  • Assistant
  • Medical Scientist 35.7

Funded in part by the Chancellors Office,
California Community Colleges
27
CAREER ADVANCEMENT ACADEMY
  • Goals
  • 1) Thoughtfully recruit, train, and prepare
  • 18-30 year olds for careers in healthcare
    and related ongoing educational
    opportunities
  • 2) Create, leverage and institutionalize
    partnerships with industry and community
    resources to increase the pool of workers
    available for healthcare related jobs

Funded in part by the Chancellors Office,
California Community Colleges
28
CAREER ADVANCEMENT ACADEMY
  • Services
  • Contextualized Basic Skills Courses
  • Career Exploration
  • Healthcare Core Bridge Program
  • Professional Training Programs
  • Entry Level Employment Options

Funded in part by the Chancellors Office,
California Community Colleges
29
CAREER ADVANCEMENT ACADEMY
  • Project Partners
  • L.A. City WIB, Community Based Organizations
  • Recruitment and supportive services
  • SEIU / L.A. Healthcare Workforce Development
    Program
  • Employer
  • Lead on Industry-driven curriculum, teacher
    trainers, counseling
  • L.A. Community College District
  • Delivers trainings
  • Institutionalizes course offerings
  • Administers CAA grant

Funded in part by the Chancellors Office,
California Community Colleges
30
CAREER ADVANCEMENT ACADEMY
31
CAREER ADVANCEMENT ACADEMY
Funded in part by the Chancellors Office,
California Community Colleges
32
CAREER ADVANCEMENT ACADEMY
Funded in part by the Chancellors Office,
California Community Colleges
33
CAREER ADVANCEMENT ACADEMY

Funded in part by the Chancellors Office,
California Community Colleges
34
CAREER ADVANCEMENT ACADEMY
Funded in part by the Chancellors Office,
California Community Colleges
35
CAREER ADVANCEMENT ACADEMY
Funded in part by the Chancellors Office,
California Community Colleges
36
CAREER ADVANCEMENT ACADEMY
Funded in part by the Chancellors Office,
California Community Colleges
37
CAREER ADVANCEMENT ACADEMY
Funded in part by the Chancellors Office,
California Community Colleges
38
CAREER ADVANCEMENT ACADEMY
Los Angeles Healthcare Workforce Development
Program
East Los Angeles College
Los Angeles Valley College
Los Angeles City College
Funded in part by the Chancellors Office,
California Community Colleges
39
CAREER ADVANCEMENT ACADEMY
Funded in part by the Chancellors Office,
California Community Colleges
40
CAREER ADVANCEMENT ACADEMY
  • Grant Objectives
  • Create a core group of specialized instructors
    for CAA Healthcare program
  • Become a model partnership of employer-specific,
    basic skills healthcare industry-driven training
    design
  • Extend grant beyond year one to further
    curriculum pathway for healthcare within LACCD
  • Institutionalize curriculum in non-credit /
    credit format for healthcare career ladder in
    partnership with SEIU and LACCD
  • Advance this pilot project into long-term,
    comprehensive training vehicle for SEIU employees
    modeled after New York Citys Lehman College

Funded in part by the Chancellors Office,
California Community Colleges
41
CAREER ADVANCEMENT ACADEMY
  • Contact Information
  • Doug Marriott
  • Los Angeles Community College District
  • marriodc_at_lavc.edu

Funded in part by the Chancellors Office,
California Community Colleges
42
CTL Instructors Experience
  • Dr. Yogesh Arora, Instructor, LA Valley College
  • Professor Arora contextualizes math science
    for healthcare careers

43
Emphasis Education, Job or Both?
  • Purpose directs
  • the learning.
  • Real life problems
  • assimilate with
  • subject-matter in the
  • classroom.

44
Teaching in the Context of JOBS Placement
  • Teaching strategies to connect
  • academics and occupation
  • content and context
  • knowledge and application
  • knowing and doing

45
(No Transcript)
46
Interest and Curiosity
  • Challenge
  • To keep the students attentive and interested.

47
Interest and Curiosity
  • Strategy
  • Demonstrate the Magic of Numbers

48
Multiplication Trick or Magic?
  • 12,345,679x9 111,111,111
  • 12,345,679x18 222,222,222
  • 12,345,679x27 333,333,333
  • 12,345,679x36 444,444,444
  • 12,345,679x45 555,555,555
  • 12,345,679x54 666,666,666
  • 12,345,679x63 777,777,777
  • 12,345,679x72 888,888,888
  • 12,345,679x81 999,999,999
  • 12,345,679x999,999,999 12,345,678,987,654,321

49
WOW!!!!
  • Is it a Pyramid or a Pattern?
  • 12 1
  • 112 121
  • 1112 12321
  • 11112 1234321
  • 111112 123454321
  • Etc.

50
Critical Thinking
  • Five times four twenty, plus two, equals
    twenty-three. Is this true?
  • A 100-meter-long train moving 100 meters per
    minute must pass through a tunnel of 100 meters
    in length. How long will it take?
  • How many times can you subtract 6 from 30?

51
(No Transcript)
52
After the Magic, What is Next?
  • Challenge
  • To correlate different solutions to a problem.

53
Correlating Decimals and Fractions
  • Strategy
  • Demonstrate different answers
  • but with equal values.

54
Equivalencies (Equal Values)
  • Fractions Decimals
    Percentages
  • 1/100 0.01 1
  • 1/50 0.02 2
  • 1/40 0.025 21/2
  • 1/25 0.04 4
  • 1/20 0.05 5
  • 1/10 0.1 10
  • 1/9 0.11 111/9
  • 1/8 0.125 121/2
  • 1/5 0. 2 20
  • 1/4 0. 25 25

55
Equivalencies (Equal Values)
  • Fractions Decimals
    Percentages
  • 1/3 0.333 331/3
  • 3/8 0.375 371/2
  • 2/5 0.4 40
  • 1/2 0.5 50
  • 3/5 0.6 60
  • 5/8 0.625 621/2
  • 2/3 0.66 662/3
  • 3/4 0.75 75
  • 4/5 0. 8 80
  • 7/8 0. 875 871/2
  • 10/10 1. 0 100

56
(No Transcript)
57
Phobia Into Interest
  • Challenge
  • To encourage students make an attempt to solve
    the problem

58
Correlating Decimals and Fractions
  • Strategy
  • Demonstrate new and interesting approach
  • - starting with simple problems.

59
Multiplication Understanding Made Easy
  • Disregard Zeroes (on the right side of numbers)
  • Multiply the numbers and add total zeroes
  • Examples
  • 30x70
  • 3x721, now add two zeroes,
  • 2100
  • Summary
  • 30 3
  • X70 X7 2,100
  • 21

60
Division Understanding Made Easy
  • Disregard Zeroes (on the right side of numbers)
  • Divide the numbers and cancel an equal number of
    zeroes
  • Examples
  • 6500130
  • 65135, now cancel one zero, add the remaining
    ones to the answer
  • 50
  • Summary
  • 6500 65
  • 130 13 50
  • 5

61
Interest To Question?
  • Challenge
  • To help students maintain the interest to further
    dissect the problem

62
Multiplication with Decimals
  • Strategy
  • Demonstrate a simplified approach.

63
Multiplication (with Decimals)
  • Disregard Decimals (count numbers on the right
    side of decimals, not zeroes)
  • Multiply the numbers and add decimal counting
    total numbers from right.
  • Examples
  • 1.1x1.20
  • 11x12132, now add decimal counting two places
    from right,
  • 1.32
  • Summary
  • 1.1 11
  • X1.20 X12 1.32
  • 132

64
Division (with Decimals)
  • Disregard Decimals (count numbers on the right
    side of decimals, not zeroes)
  • Divide the numbers and add zero for each number
    after the decimal.
  • Examples
  • 482.4
  • 48242 (disregard decimal, now add one zero, for
    the number after decimal for the answer
  • 20
  • Summary
  • 48 48
  • 2.4 24 20
  • 2

65
SUM OF SOME NUMBERS
  • How to get the Sum of numbers from 1 to 100?
  • Sum, S n ( n1) where n number
  • 2
  • Example Sum of numbers from1 to 90
  • 1234567891090
  • 90 (901) 4095
  • 2

66
(No Transcript)
67
Dimensional Analysis Data Analysis
  • Dimensional Analysis
  • OR Unit conversion
  • Example
  • A 16 ounces bottle of milkshake contains 13.60 gm
    of fat. How many grams of fat are in each ounce?

68
Collection and Analysis of Data
Source Students Manual - Math for Healthcare
Careers, LAVC, 2009
69
(No Transcript)
70
Normal Saline/Salt Solution
  • Saline or Salt Sodium chloride, NaCl
  • Normal saline 0.9
  • Means 0.9 g in 100 mL of water (sterile)
  • IV means INTRA VENOUS
  • Example An IV solution of 0.9 is being infused
    to a patient at a rate of 15.5 mL per hour. How
    many mL would infuse in 4.25 hours?

71
Temperature Conversion
  • F 1.8 C 32
  • C F 32
  • 1.8
  • Example A British child on arrival in USA says
    his temperature is 37.5 degrees C. What is his
    temperature in F degrees?
  • Estimation vs. Calculation?
  • Normal Body Temperature
  • 97.6 degrees F 37 degrees C

72
Blood Volume, Groups and Fractions
  • About 8 of body weight
  • Volume about 5 liters
  • Blood Groups
  • A A antigen and anti-B antibody
  • B B antigen and anti-A antibody
  • AB A and B antigen, No antibodies,
  • (Universal recipient)
  • O No A or B antigens. Both anti-A and
  • anti-B antibodies.
  • (Universal donor)
  • Rh factor Positive or Negative

73
Numbers Facts About Blood
  • In US, 85 of the population has Rh
  • In China, 99 of the population has Rh
  • Different Animals have different blood groups
  • Dogs 4
  • Sheep/Goat 7
  • Horse/Donkey 7
  • Cats 11
  • Cows 800

74
Fractions and Mental Math
  • Which blood type is most common in the
    population?
  • Which blood type is least common in the
    population?

American Red Cross Data Source Students Manual -
Math for Healthcare Careers, LAVC, 2009
75
Our Body and Organ Systems
  • 11 Organ systems
  • Integumentary system
  • Skeletal system
  • Muscular system
  • Nervous system
  • Endocrine system
  • Cardiovascular system
  • Lymphatic system
  • Respiratory system
  • Digestive system
  • Urinary system
  • Reproductive system

76
Metric Conversion
  • Rules
  • If you are converting from a 'bigger' unit to a
    'smaller' unit, move the decimal point to the
    right.
  • If you are converting from a 'smaller' unit to a
    'bigger' unit, move the decimal point to the
    left.

77
Metric Conversion Decimals- a Ladder
To Convert to a smaller unit Move decimal point
to the RIGHT OR MULTIPLY
Kilo

Hecta
kg km
Deka
BASE UNIT
To Convert to a LARGER unit Move decimal point
to the LEFT OR DIVIDE
Deci
1 g 1 L 1 m
Centi
dL
Milli
cm
Micro
mg mL mm
µg µL µm
Nano
ng,nm
78
Drip and Volume/Percent
  • QUICK MATH Exercise
  • A patient is receiving 1500mL saline every 6
    hours. What is the new amount if doctor says to
    decrease it by 20?
  • OR
  • What is 0.1 of aqueous solution?

79
Human Body and Burns
  • Burns Injury to tissues due to heat,
    chemical, electric shock, lightning or
    radiation.
  • Burn patients care and survival
  • Three primary variables
  • Degree of the burn
  • Percent of body burn
  • Patients vital signs

80
Human Body and Burns
  • First degree or partial thickness burn
  • superficial
  • only epidermis is damaged
  • Erythema, mild edema, surface layer
  • shed
  • Healing a few days to two weeks
  • No blisters or scarring
  • Example sunburn

81
Human Body and Burns
  • Second degree
  • - deep partial-layer burn
  • Destroys epidermis
  • Blisters formed
  • Healing depends on survival of accessory organs
  • No scars unless infected

82
Human Body and Burns
  • Third degree or full-thickness burn
  • Destroys epidermis, dermis and accessory organs
    of the skin
  • Healing occurs from margins inward
  • Leaves white charred tissue
  • Skin grafting may be needed

83
The Rule of Nines
  • To calculate the or
  • the extent of burns
  • Used in First Aid/Burned
  • victims
  • Most parts of human body
  • consists of 9 of the
  • surface area

Fig. Rule of Nine. Source J.C. Scherer, 1982.
Taken from Math for Healthcare Careers, LAVC,
2009
84
HEARTBEATS
  • Two phases of the heartbeat
  • diastole relaxation
  • systole contraction
  • The diastole-systole cardiac cycle occurs average
    72 times per minute
  • About 100,000 times per day
  • About 2.5 BILLION times in life (Avg. 66 yrs)
  • The heart pumps 65 mL of blood with each
    contraction.
  • Means about 4.75 liters are pumped per minute
  • 285 liters an hour
  • 7000 liters a day
  • 60,00 miles of Blood vessels

85
BLOOD PRESSURE CHECK
  • Blood pressure The force that blood exerts on
    arterial walls.
  • Measured using
  • Sphygmomanometer
  • Blood Pressure,
  • Expressed as a fraction
  • systolic pressure / diastolic pressure
  • 120/80 mm Hg

Source The Language of Medicine, Eighth Edition,
Devi-Ellen Chabner. Saunders, 2007.
86
Numbers and Human Body
  • Digestive system
  • Organs from Mouth to Anus
  • Digests, absorbs and excretes
  • Small intestine is bigger in length, about 7
    meters, but smaller in diameter.
  • Large intestine is small in length, about 1.5
    meters, but larger in diameter

87
Numbers and Human Body
  • Urinary system
  • Maintains bodys water and salt balance
  • Regulates Bloods acid-base balance
  • Removes nitrogen containing waste
  • About 1 Million glomeruli (tiny balls of
    capillaries) in the cortex of kidney
  • 150 liters of fluid filtered daily
  • Kidney reabsorbs 98-99 of water and salts
  • 1.5 liters urine excreted daily

88
Numbers and Human Body
  • Male Reproductive system
  • Sperm cell, 1/3 the size of RBC
  • 1/100,000th, the size of female ovum
  • Only 1 out of 300 million sperm cells can
    penetrate single ovum and fertilize

89
Class Interactions
  • Encourage students to ask
  • questions
  • Value their questions
  • Appropriate response
  • Cite examples in Healthcare
  • Involve Participate

90
Three Ps To Successful Learning
  • Practice
  • Seat Activity
  • Practice
  • Group Activity
  • Practice
  • Board Activity

ONLY, PERFECT Practice makes it Perfect!
91
Reflections on Students
  • High Attendance
  • Less Absenteeism
  • Work Harder
  • More Interested
  • More Responsible
  • Better Behaved
  • Enhanced comprehension
  • Greater Learning Progress

92
A Rational Assessment
  • Evaluate - the knowledge gained
  • Apply - the knowledge gained
  • Exhibit - the knowledge gained
  • Through
  • Intra-group knowledge sharing
  • Inter-group knowledge sharing

93
Added Stimulus
  • Help with Computers/Resume making
  • Employers
  • Various employers every week
  • Like Holding a reward
  • Potentials of Jobs
  • Personal stories from graduates
  • Encouragement from families

94
Outcomes of CTL
  • Increased knowledge retention
  • Enhanced student motivation
  • Teaching becomes a Team Effort
  • Between the instructor and the class
  • Encouraging student persistence
  • Learning becomes their Pride
  • Responsibility to assimilate

95
Be Wise!!!
  • Knowledge is Proud
  • That It had learnt So Much
  • Wisdom is Humble
  • That It Knows No More!

96
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
  • Sincere Thanks to
  • Lennie Ciufo
  • Doug Marriott
  • Marcella Sardanis
  • Support Staff
  • Career Advancement Academy
  • at LAVC

97
Break
98
Discussion
  • What basic skills CTL opportunities do you see to
    create shift at your college?
  • Learning Communities
  • Directed Learning Activities
  • Contextualized Lessons
  • What CTL barriers do you feel are present at your
    college?
  • Resistance from colleagues or administration
  • Time to devote to development
  • Resources to support development
  • Groups Reports
  • How do you get college buy-in?

99
Agenda for day 2
  • March 12, 900 am Noon
  • Check-in, review yesterdays discussions
  • Effective practices in contextualized teaching
    and learning (CTL) Discussion on CCAAs pitfalls,
    concerns, discoveries, successes, and redesigns.
  • Story time Write a story about your experience
    teaching students with basic skills needs
    enrolled in your class.
  • Share stories

100
Agenda Day 2 Contd
  • Action Plan Turning your experience into
    action. Review action plan template and develop a
    plan
  • Report out on action plans Wrap up
  • Lunch Break
  • Breakout session from 330 445pm
  • Deborah Harrington, BSI Phase IV Overview of
    Professional Development Program

101
The Career Academy Model
  • Discussion on CAAs pitfalls, concerns,
    discoveries, successes, and redesigns.

102
In 66 percent of low-income working families in
California, no parent has had any postsecondary
education. This ranks dead last among the 50
states. Working Poor Families Project Today,
more than four million (about 18 percent) of
adult Californians 18-64 have not earned a high
school diploma. In 2020, that number will swell
to 22 percent of the working-age
population. National Commission on Adult
Literacy, Public Policy Institute of
California Slides from Linda Collins, Executive
Director, Career Ladders Project
103

Education Projections for 2020 Employment
Demand and Population
Source Public Policy Institute of California
Slides from Linda Collins, Executive Director,
Career Ladders Project
104
Career Advancement Academies
  • Establish pipelines to college and high wage
    careers for disconnected, underprepared young
    adults (18 30 yrs)
  • Three regions (23 colleges)
  • East Bay
  • Central Valley
  • Los Angeles
  • State investment SB70
  • 5M per region over 3 years
  • Partnerships with employers, workforce boards,
    unions, community orgs, adult ed/ROCPs

105
Key Design Elements . . .
  • Broad outreach to underserved populations
  • Transition programs bridge to college career
  • Address basic skills in context of career
  • Focus on high wage careers in demand in region
  • Cohort-based, learning communities
  • Intensive support services
  • Clear transitions to continued education and
    career pathways

106
Additional Features . . .
  • Community of learners across sites
  • Career Ladders Project / Philanthropy
  • Document and share effective practices
  • Common Data and Evaluation
  • CalPASS and Public Private Ventures
  • CC System recently added 1.5M to extend
  • Linking afterschool employment to career
    pathways (in education and public service)
  • Informing the CC System Basic Skills Initiative

107
A Research Based Approach . . .
Many people learn better and faster, and retain
information longer, when they are taught concepts
in context.
  • Makes it relevant
  • Engages and motivates hard-to-reach students
  • Increases learner confidence enthusiasm
  • Enhances interest in long-term goals education

Basic Skills as a Foundation for Student Success
in CA Community Colleges, p. 58.
108
Contextualized Teaching Learning
  • Strategies to link essential skills academic or
    occupational content
  • concrete applications
  • specific context of interest to the student
  • Includes
  • Design of curricula
  • integration of essential skills content
  • Teaching
  • use of cases, project-based learning and other
    student-centered practices
  • Assessment
  • examining application of knowledge and the
    transfer of skills

109
Transition Programs . . .
110
Programa en Carpintería Fina
  • Instruction includes
  • Cabinet Furniture Making for the Trades
  • VESL, Workplace English, Wood Tech Vocabulary,
    English Measurement,
  • Shop Math
  • Faculty Wood Technology, ESL, Math Bilingual
    Assistant Instructor, Counselor
  • Leading to entry level crafts positions
    continued education in Advanced Woodworking and
    Furniture Making

A Partnership of the East Bay Career Advancement
Academy, Laney College Wood Technology Department
the local woodworking industry
111
Utilities Construction Prep
  • Intensive, 8 week program to prepare students
    for entry-level jobs in the utilities industry
    and construction trades
  • Workplace Fitness Conditioning
  • Industry Overview, Softskills Workplace
    Readiness
  • Workplace Reading Computation Skills
  • Applied Construction Skills
  • Hands-on training needed to succeed in work
  • Assistance with job applications, interviews
    and placement

112
Fresno City CAA Auto, Welding, CAD/CAM
113
Options for design . . .
114
Bridge Core Curriculum
  • Basic Reading Comprehension Writing for
    Healthcare Employees
  • Basic Math for Healthcare Employees
  • Critical Thinking Rational Decision-Making for
    Healthcare Employees (Embedded in Curriculum)
  • Customer Service / Communication Skills
  • Computer Applications for Healthcare

115
WA Tipping Point Study
  • What did they find?
  • Only 20 of basic skills students completed
    voc-ed program, certificate or credential
  • One yr post-secondary ed . certificate is
    tipping point for meaningful earnings gains
    (7,000/year more)
  • Strong job demand for that skill level
  • 1-full year means student prepared for further
    higher education
  • Why is it important?
  • Research trusted widely quoted (Ford
    Foundation Columbia)
  • Reframed discussion about education of
    under-prepared, low-income youth and adults
  • Broad influence across state policy work
    first short-term training wont get to the
    tipping point
  • Led to creation of new, contextualized programs
    and infusion of career pathways throughout state
    workforce training and education programs

116
Integrated Basic Education And Skills
Training
  • What is it?
  • Paired ABE/ESL w/ CTE instructors basic skills
    in context
  • Full-time, cohort-based learning community
  • For-credit instruction
  • Support services single point of contact
  • One-year ed. programs so students reach tipping
    point
  • Programs require additional coordination and
    faculty time
  • I-BEST students funded at 1.75 FTE

117
Integrated Basic Education And Skills
Training
  • What did they learn?
  • I-BEST students compared to other ESL/Basic
    skills students
  • earned 5 times more credits
  • 15 times more likely to complete
  • Results at 10 colleges led to enhanced FTES
    reimbursement funding to expand program to
    other 24 colleges
  • Led to additional state supports Opportunity
    Grants (2007)
  • Student 1,000 PLUS tuition/fees
  • Community College 1,500/FTES for support
    services counseling
  • Students in job specific, high demand programs

118
Discussion Questions
  • What did you hear today that would be useful for
    working with students from your community?
  • What do you have already that you can build on?
    What additional supports would be helpful?
  • What next steps would you recommend as follow-up?

119
Writing Exercise
Story time How have students with basic skills
needs changed your teaching, your job, or your
interest in education? Prompt What three things
do you find most rewarding about teaching
students with basic skills needs? Write a short
story about one of them. Prompt What are your
three biggest challenges about teaching students
with basic skills needs? Write a short story
about one of them. Share stories
120
Faculty Inquiry
  • Devise a questions about student learning that
    guides your work.A. What is the problem at the
    heart of your investigation?B. What do you need
    to understand better about basic skills
    education?C. What puzzles you about student
    performance in the classroom?D. What critical
    gaps do you see in student learning?
  • How did you arrive at these questions?A. What
    hunches do you have in developing these
    questions?B. What data have you collected so far
    to test your hunches?C. What research literature
    is informing your thinking on this topic?
  • Outline your plans for investigating these
    issues.

121
Working together
Developing collegiality creating faculty
collaboration Step 1 Create a forum for
faculty to meet Step 2 At the first meeting,
be honest about your fears and limitations Step
3 Identify the issues the problems you want
to address Step 4 Agree to collaborate on
???? Step 5 Be respectful of colleagues Show
up take assignments seriouslybe
responsible Step 6 Document your work
(videotape sessions) Step 7 Observe, analyze,
discuss, adjust Step 8 go back to Step
1
122
(No Transcript)
123
Lesson Studydissecting a lesson with colleagues
across disciplines
http//www.uwlax.edu/sotl/lsp/
124
Taking Action
  • Review the Contextualized Teaching and Learning
    Work Plan Template
  • Work in teams to complete the template
  • What benchmarks will you use to determine
    progress on your plan?
  • What measures will you use to determine if you
    have reached your goals?

125
Final Thoughts
  • Whats next
  • Implement a contextualized teaching and learning
    program for students with basic skills needs at
    your college
  • Measure student success in multiple ways
    including using data collected from video taping,
    from surveys, from collecting samples of work and
    from your local institutional research office
  • Include the student voice in your project
  • Celebrate your successes

126
Lunch BreakResume at 330 Breakout
127
Basic Skills Initiative 2009
  • Deborah Harrington, English Instructor, Dean
    of Student Success at LACCD,and the Director of
    BSI Phase IV
About PowerShow.com