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Title: C.S. Lewis: Life and Work


1
C.S. Lewis Life and Work Joy Through Reason,
Imagination and Faith Oct 17 - The Formative
Years Longing for Joy Nov 14 - The Pilgrim's
RegressIn Search of Joy Nov 28 - Story Telling
Living in Joy Dec 12 - The Christian Knight The
Apologetics of Joy (Suffering and The
Shadowlands) The joy of the Lord is our
strength. Neh. 810 Compiled by Dr. Paulo F.
Ribeiro Shawnee Park CRC WOW Fall 2001, AD I
believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun
has risen, not only because I see it but because
by it I see everything else.
2
Prayer is either a sheer illusion or a personal
contact between embryonic, incomplete persons
(ourselves) and the utterly concrete Person.
Prayer in the sense of petition, asking for
things, is a small part of it confession and
penitence are its threshold, adoration its
sanctuary, the presence and vision and enjoyment
of God its wine. In it God shows himself to us.
That He answers prayers is a corollarynot
necessarily the most important one. What He does
is learned from what He is.C.S. Lewis
3
All that is not eternal is eternally out of
date. "Christianity, if false, is of no
importance, and, if true, of infinite
importance. The one thing it cannot be is
moderately important" ____________________________
_______________________________________________ "I
s--is he a man?" asked Lucy. "Aslan a man!"
said Mr. Beaver sternly. "Certainly not. I tell
you he is the King of the wood and the son of the
great Emperor-Beyond-the-Sea. Don't you know who
is the King of Beasts? Aslan is a lion--the Lion,
the great Lion." "Ooh!" said Susan, "I'd
thought he was a man. Is he--quite safe? I shall
feel rather nervous about meeting a lion."
"That you will, dearie, and no mistake,' said
Mrs. Beaver, 'if there's anyone who can appear
before Aslan without their knees knocking,
they're either braver than most or else just
silly." "Then he isn't safe?" said Lucy.
"Safe?" said Mr. Beaver. "Don't you hear what
Mrs. Beaver tells you? Who said anything about
safe? 'Course he isn't safe. But he's good. He's
the King I tell you." "I'm longing to see him,"
said Peter, "even if I do feel frightened when it
comes to the point." The Lion, the Witch, and
the Wardrobe) ____________________________________
________________ Who is this man, who can write
so clearly, convincingly, inspiring, and
profoundly ? Scholar, childrens story, adult
fiction In this next four WOWs I hope to share
with you some insights into the life and writings
of this incredible Christian I hope you will be
inspired, blessed, encouraged by Lewiss
imagination, writings, honesty, and faith in our
Savior Jesus Christ.
4
Why Lewis The most important Christian writer of
the 20th century. I encountered Lewis 27 years
ago. Thanks for the opportunity Style
Participation facilitator . Share your
insights etc.
5
Footnote to All PrayersHe whom I bow to only
knows to whom I bowWhen I attempt the ineffable
Name, murmuring Thou,And dream of Pheidian
fancies and embrace in heartSymbols (I know)
which cannot be the thing Thou art.Thus always,
taken at their word, all prayers
blasphemeWorshipping with frail images a
folk-lore dream,And all men in their praying,
self-deceived, addressThe coinage of their own
unquiet thoughts, unlessThou in magnetic mercy
to Thyself divertOur arrows, aimed unskilfully,
beyond desertAnd all men are idolators, crying
unheardTo a deaf idol, if Thou take them at
their word.Take not, O Lord, our literal sense.
 Lord, in thy greatUnbroken speech our limping
metaphor translate.
6
The Apologist's Evening PrayerFrom all my lame
defeats and oh! much moreFrom all the victories
that I seemed to scoreFrom cleverness shot
forth on Thy behalfAt which, while angels weep,
the audience laughFrom all my proofs of Thy
divinity,Thou, who wouldst give no sign, deliver
me.Thoughts are but coins.  Let me not trust,
insteadof Thee, their thin-worn image of Thy
head.From all my thoughts, even from my thoughts
of Thee,O thou fair Silence, fall, and set me
free.Lord of the narrow gate and needle's
eye,Take from me all my trumpery lest I die.
7
It is a serious thing to live in a society of
possible gods and goddesses, to remember that the
dullest and most uninteresting person you talk to
may one day be a creature which, if you saw it
now, you would be strongly tempted to worship, or
else a horror and a corruption such as you now
meet, if at all, only in a nightmare. All day
long we are, in some degree, helping each other
to one or other of these destinations. It is in
the light of these overwhelming possibilities, it
is with the awe and the circumspection proper to
them, that we should conduct all our dealings
with one another, all friendships, all loves, all
play, all politics. There are no ordinary people.
You have never talked to a mere mortal. Nations,
cultures, arts, civilization--these are mortal,
and their life is to ours as the life of a gnat.
But it is immortals whom we joke with, work with,
marry, snub, and exploit--immortal horrors or
everlasting splendors. C. S. Lewis, The Weight
of Glory and Other Addresses (Grand Rapids,
Michigan Eerdmans, 1965), pp. 1415 emphasis in
original
8
In one way, of course, God has given us the
Morning Star already you can go and enjoy the
gift on many fine mornings if you get up early
enough. What more, you may ask, do we want? Ah,
but we want so much more--something the books on
aesthetics take little notice of. But the poets
and the mythologies know all about it. We do not
want merely to see beauty, though, God knows,
even that is bounty enough. We want something
else which can hardly be put into words--to be
united with the beauty we see, to pass into it,
to receive it into ourselves, to bathe in it, to
become part of it. .. That is why the poets tell
us such lovely falsehoods. They talk as if the
west wind could really sweep into a human soul
but it can't. They tell us that "beauty born of
murmuring sound" will pass into a human face but
it won't. Or not yet. For if we take the imagery
of Scripture seriously, if we believe that God
will one day give us the Morning Star and cause
us to put on the splendor of the sun, then we may
surmise that both the ancient myths and the
modern poetry, so false as history, may be very
near the truth as prophecy. At present we are on
the outside of the world, the wrong side of the
door. We discern the freshness and purity of
morning, but they do not make us fresh and pure.
We cannot mingle with the splendors we see. But
all the leaves of the New Testament are rustling
with the rumor that it will not always be so.
Some day, God willing, we shall get in.
9
"When Christianity says that God loves man, it
means that God loves man not that He has some
concern for our welfare, but that we are the
objects of His love. You asked for a loving God
you have one. The great spirit you so lightly
invoked, is present not a senile benevolence
that drowsily wishes you to be happy in your own
way, not the cold philanthropy of a conscientious
magistrate, not the care of a host who feels
responsible for the comfort of his guests, but
the consuming fire Himself, the Love that made
the worlds, persistent as the artist's love for
his work and despotic as a man's love for a dog,
provident and venerable as a father's love for a
child, jealous, inexorable, exacting as love
between the sexes. How should this be, I do not
know it passes reason to explain why creatures,
not to say creatures such as we, should have a
value so prodigious in their Creators eyes. CS
Lewis, The Problem of Pain
10
I think it important to try to see the present
calamity in a true perspective. The war
terrorism creates no absolutely new situation
it simply aggravates the permanent human
situation so that we can no longer ignore it.
Human life has always been lived on the edge of a
precipice. Human culture has always had to exist
under the shadow of something infinitely more
important than itself. If men had postponed the
search for knowledge and beauty until they were
secure, the search would have never begun. We are
mistaken when we compare war to "normal life."
Life has never been normal. Even those periods we
think most tranquil, like the nineteenth century,
turn out on closer inspection, to be full of
crises, alarms, difficulties, emergencies.
Plausible reasons have never been lacking for
putting off all merely cultural activities until
some imminent danger has been averted or some
crying injustice put right. But humanity long ago
chose to neglect those plausible reasons. They
propound theorems in beleaguered cities, conduct
metaphysical arguments in condemned cells, make
jokes on scaffolds, discuss poetry while
advancing on the walls of Quebec This is not
panache it is our nature. C.S. Lewis, "Learning
in War-Time," in The Weight of Glory and Other
Addresses
11
A Solid Man Thoroughly Converted Marvelous and
Seductive Writer A Romantic A Christian Knight
(Apologist) Scholar Fiction Writer Novel
Writer Tutor (Not a Sir Just Jack) A
Prophet Childrens Literature Poetry Wrote with
Authority, Mere Christianity, Powerful mind,
Fresh Perspective, Wrote Well, Wrote with
Authority The Purpose and Content of the
Study This study is designed to introduce you to
the life, thought and works of C. S. Lewis. C.
S. Lewis never claimed to be a theologian. He
approached Christianity from a very intellectual,
academic, but honest way not theological. "
Mere Christianity is the core set of beliefs
held by the majority of Christians throughout the
ages. Lewis believed what Jesus claimed to be
the unique Son of God. He believed that Jesus was
literally born of a virgin, crucified, buried,
and that He physically rose again never to die
again. Mere Christianity teaches the doctrine of
the Trinity that Father, Son, and Holy Ghost are
all three God, and that God is one. C. S. Lewis
tried to demonstrate that the supernatural does
exist and that miracles did occur. Mere
Christianity teaches that Christ died for our
sins, that He was resurrected to prove that He
conquered death and that to receive forgiveness
of sin one must respond in faith to Him. The
Theme This study covers the major issues that C.
S. Lewis struggled with in his own life and
subsequently addressed in his writings the
problem of suffering and pain, the existence of
the supernatural or the miraculous, and how
Christianity is the only world-view that
consistently explains the nature of man and the
universe.
12
Timeline 1898 Clive Staples Lewis born in
Belfast, Ireland 1908 Lewis's mother dies 1917
Lewis begins studies at University College,
Oxford 1925 Awarded a fellowship in English at
Oxford's Magdalen College publication of G.K.
Chesterton's The Everlasting Man 1929 Converts
to theism and, in 1931, Christianity 1933 The
first members of the Inklings meet in Lewis's
chambers 1937 J. R. R. Tolkien publishes The
Hobbit 1939 Author Charles Williams moves to
Oxford, joins the Inklings 1941 Publication of
The Screwtape Letters gains Lewis worldwide fame
Dorothy Sayers, Lewis's friend and a 22-year
member of his Socratic Club at Oxford, publishes
her best- known work, The Man Born to Be King
1948 Lewis loses debate to British philosopher
Elizabeth Anscombe 1950-56 Writes seven volumes
of The Chronicles of Narnia 1952 Mere
Christianity, a collection of radio broadcasts
Lewis delivered during World War II, is
published 1954-55 Publication of Tolkien's The
Lord of the Rings 1956 Lewis marries Joy
Davidman Gresham in a civil ceremony (a Christian
ceremony followed in 1957) 1960 Joy dies to
deal with his emotions, Lewis writes A Grief
Observed 1963 Lewis dies at his home, The
Kilns.

13
1898 (November 29) Born Clive Staples in Belfast,
Ireland, to Albert James Lewis and Flora Augusta
Hamilton Lewis.1905 Lewis family moves to
"Little Lea".1908 (August 23) Mother died of
cancer Clive Staples (Jack), and older brother
Warren sent to Wynyard School in England.1910
Attends Campbell College, Belfast for one term
due to sickness and father's dissatisfaction with
the school.1911-13 Studied at Cherbourg School,
Malvern England, following his brother
Warren.1914-16 Extensive literary and
philosophical studies under the private teaching
of W.T. Kirkpatrick.1916 Won scholarship to
University College, Oxford.1917 (April 28)
Began studies at Oxford interrupted by serving
in WWI Commisioned as second lieutenant in
Somerset light infantry.1918 Hospitalized for
"trench fever" rejoined his battalion, wounded
in Battle of Arras, France, and hospitalized
again.1919 Resumed studies at Oxford. Moves in
with Mrs. Moore and begins their
relationship.1925 (May) Elected Fellow of
English Language and Literature at Magdalen
College, Oxford, where he remained until 1954.
14
1929 (Trinity Term) Becomes a practicing Theist.
(September) Lewis' father dies.1930 (October)
Lewis and Mrs. Moore settle at The Kilns.1931
(28 September) Becomes a practicing
Christian.1939 Began meeting with the
Inklings.1941 (6 August) Began first of
twenty-five talks about religion over the BBC.
Formed the Socratic Club at Oxford.1946 Passed
over for Merton professorship of English
Literature at Oxford. Awarded the Doctorate of
Divinity by St. Andrews University.1951 Offered
the honor of Commander of the Order of the
British Empire by the Prime Minister but
cordially refused. Mrs. Jane King Moore died.
1955 (1 January) Elected Professor of Medieval
and Renaissance Literature Magdalen College,
Cambridge.1956 (23 April) Married Joy Davidman
Gresham in secret civil ceremony.1957 (21
March) Married Joy in church ceremony at her
hospital bed.1960 (13 July) Joy Davidman Lewis
died.1963 (July) Lewis goes into a coma and is
expected to die. (22 November) Lewis dies at the
Kilns. American President John F. Kennedy was
assassinated in Dallas, Texas and on the same day
author Aldous Huxley died in California.
15
  • Lewis' life was one of change.
  • He lost both of his parents during his life.
  • He had to move to England.
  • He had to go to war.
  • He went back to school after the war.
  • He left Christianity and then came back to it.
  • He came back to his father after disliking him.
  • Lewis had a varied educational life.
  • Lewis had a private tutor as a child.
  • Lewis first school was a bad experience.
  • Kirkpatrick taught Lewis literature.
  • Lewis went to University College which is in
    Oxford.
  • He became a second lieutenant in the Somerset
    Infantry.
  • In 1954 he was elected professor of medieval and
    Renaissance English literature for Cambridge.
  • Lewis is commonly thought of as a Christian,
    though at one time he was an atheist.
  • Lewis was raised Anglican, but Surprised By Joy
    hints that he grew up in a religiously unstable
    household.
  • He became and atheist because of his personal and
    philosophical ideas.
  • He returned to Christianity in his thirties.
  • Hugo Dyson played a role in convincing Lewis to
    drop atheism and come back to Christianity.

16
  • C. S. (Clive Staples) Lewis wrote books about
    religion in two ways.
  • One way Lewis wrote was with imagery.
  • His most famous book is The Screwtape Letters.
  • Lewis series of books in Narnia are childrens
    books and are less familiar to the public in
    general.
  • The Narnia series tells the story of Jesus in a
    fairy-tale.
  • The model for Lewis' Narnia series comes from his
    mother's childhood experience of seeing a dead
    saint open her eyes.
  • He wrote a three novel trilogy that was science
    fiction and concerning good and evil.
  • His book Till We Have Faces, is the story of
    Cupid and Psyche.
  • The other way Lewis wrote was non-fiction.
  • Mere Christianity explained his basic thoughts on
    doctrine. (The British Broadcasting Corporation
    talks were published in this book.)
  • Surprised by Joy is a self-authored book
    describing how he left atheism for Christianity.
  • His other works include The Great Divorce, The
    Problem of Pain and Allegory of Love A Study in
    Medieval Tradition.
  • Certain loved ones had affects on Lewis' life.
  • Lewis mother died when he was nine years old.
  • Lewis first two works were published under the
    pen name Clive Hamilton Hamilton was his
    mother's maiden name.
  • Lewis' father's death affected him more that he
    admitted.
  • He feared that critics would attribute his
    theological thought could be explained in terms
    of the Oedipus complex.
  • Lewis' wrote that his father's death "does not
    really come into the story I am telling."
  • Lewis loved Mrs. Moore.

17
Introductory Remarks Champion of Basic / Mere
Christianity Born into a bookish family of
Protestants in Belfast, Ireland. "There were
books in the study, books in the dining room,
books in the cloakroom, books (two deep) in the
great bookcase on the landing, books in a
bedroom, books piled as high as my shoulder in
the cistern attic, books of all kinds," A Life
of Problems and Moments of Delight (Joy) Lewis
mother's death from cancer came just three months
before Jack's tenth birthday, and the young man
was hurt deeply by her passing. On top of that,
his father never fully recovered from her death,
and both boys felt increasingly estranged from
him home life was never warm and satisfying
again. Transition From Christianity to
Atheism His mother's death convinced young Jack
that the God he encountered in the Bible his
mother gave him didn't always answer prayers.
This early doubt, coupled with an unduly harsh,
self-directed spiritual regimen and the influence
of a mildly occultist boarding school matron a
few years later, caused Lewis to reject
Christianity and become an avowed atheist.
University Life Lewis entered Oxford in 1917 as
a student and never really left. "The place has
surpassed my wildest dreams," he wrote to his
father after spending his first day there. "I
never saw anything so beautiful." Despite an
interruption to fight in World War I (in which he
was wounded by a bursting shell), he always
maintained his home and friends in Oxford.
18
Introductory Remarks Marvelous and Seductive
Writer (Chronicles of Narnia set, for example, is
among Amazon.com's top 200 titles) Time Magazine
1947 Having lured his reader onto the the
straight highway of logic, Lewis then inveigles
him down the garden paths of orthodox theology.
The implication Could such a clever man be
sincere about the Christianity he was
proclaiming? That was the first beauty I ever
knew. What a real garden had failed to do, the
toy garden did. It made me aware of nature--not
indeed, as a storehouse of forms and colors but
as something cool, dewy, fresh,
exuberant. Intense Experiences From His
Childhood Longing For Joy (Inconsolable secrete
the secrete we cannot hide and cannot tell,
though we desire to do both.) The Search For Joy
Becomes The Unifying Theme of C.S. Lewis Life
The Search for the inexpressible "In speaking of
this desire for our own far-off country, . . . I
feel a certain shyness. I am almost committing an
indecency. I am trying to rip open the
inconsolable secret in each one of you - the
secret which hurts so much that you take your
revenge on it by calling it names like Nostalgia
and Romanticism and Adolescence the secret also
which pierces with such sweetness that when, in
very intimate conversation, the mention of it
becomes imminent, we grow awkward and affect to
laugh at ourselves the secret we cannot hide and
cannot tell, though we desire to do both . . .
The books or the music in which we thought the
beauty was located will betray us if we trust to
them it was not in them, it only came through
them . . . Here, then, is the desire, still
wandering and uncertain of its object and still
largely unable to see that object in the
direction where it really lies . . . Heaven is,
by definition, outside our experience, but all
intelligible descriptions must be of things
within our experience. The scriptural picture of
heaven is therefore just as symbolical as the
picture which our desire, unaided, invents for
itself . . . " Sehnsucht Longing, Joy ,
Beauty It was not until his Christian Conversion
that Lewis understood what he was seeking Lewis
found joy in Greek and Nordic Mythology, Music,
Literature, Nature, Friends...
19
C.S. Lewis Early Years First nine Years -
Mother Dies, Boys Sent to Boarding School
(England) Books, Books, and Books Growing Up
Loving and Intellectual Mother, Unstable Father,
Vile Boarding School Became Serious About
Christianity - But A Distorted Christianity Led
Him To Reject It All Together Reads G.K.
Chesterton (greatly influences Lewis) (A young
man who wishes to remain a sound atheist cannot
be too careful of his reading. Preparatory
School He Lost His Faith and His
Simplicity Became Serious About His Studies,
His Imaginative Life Flourished New Tutor
Kirkpatrick (atheist, ruthless rational) - New
Environment Surrey Country Side Kirkpatrick
Lewis is Qualified for Nothing Else, But The
Academic Life Becomes Fascinated With Poetry,
Romance and Mythology (He later wondered if his
near adoration of false gods whom he did not
believe was the true Gods way of developing
within him a keen capacity for sincere
worship.) Start To Develop a Priggish Sense of
Superiority (He Maintained that God did not
exist. He was angry with God for not existing,
and was equally angry with Him for creating the
world) Arrives At Oxford Goes To War (on his 19th
birthday he arrived in the frontline trenches in
France) Meets Paddy Moore (Fellow Soldier) -
Takes Care of Paddys Mother Until she died 1951
20
Longing for Joy Reading, Reading - Especially
enjoyed Christian author George MacDonald.
Phantastes, powerfully challenged his atheism.
"What it actually did to me," wrote Lewis, "was
to convert, even to baptizemy imagination." G.
K. Chesterton's books - The Everlasting Man,
raised serious questions about the young
intellectual's materialism. "A young man who
wishes to remain a sound atheist cannot be too
careful of his reading," Lewis later wrote in the
autobiographical Surprised by Joy. "God is, if I
may say it, very unscrupulous." Logic - Close
friend Owen Barfield pounced on the logic of
Lewis's atheism. Barfield had converted from
atheism to theism, then finally to Christianity,
and he frequently badgered Lewis about his
materialism. So did Nevill Coghill, a brilliant
fellow student and lifelong friend who, to
Lewis's amazement, was "a Christian and a
thoroughgoing supernaturalist." Soon after
joining the English faculty at Oxford's Magdalen
College, Lewis met two more Christians, Hugo
Dyson and J. R. R. Tolkien. These men became
close friends of Lewis. He admired their
brilliance and their logic. Soon Lewis recognized
that most of his friends, like his favorite
authorsMacDonald, Chesterton, Johnson, Spenser,
and Miltonheld to this Christianity. In 1929
these roads met, and Lewis surrendered, admitting
"God was God, and knelt and prayed." Within two
years the reluctant convert also moved from
theism to Christianity and joined the Church of
England. Almost immediately, Lewis set out in a
new direction, most demonstrably in his writing.
Earlier efforts to become a poet were laid to
rest. The new Christian devoted his talent and
energy to writing prose that reflected his
recently found faith. Within two years of his
conversion, Lewis published The Pilgrim's
Regress An Allegorical Apology for Christianity,
Reason and Romanticism (1933). This little volume
opened a 30-year stream of books on Christian
apologetics and discipleship that became a
lifelong avocation. Not everyone approved of his
new interest in apologetics. Lewis frequently
received criticism from members of his closest
circle of friends, the Inklings (the nickname for
the group of intellectuals and writers who met
regularly to exchange ideas). Even close
Christian friends like Tolkien and Owen Barfield
openly disapproved of Lewis's evangelistic
speaking and writing. In fact, Lewis's
"Christian" books caused so much disapproval that
he was more than once passed over for a
professorship at Oxford, with the honors going to
men of lesser reputation. It was Magdalene
College at Cambridge University that finally
honored Lewis with a chair in 1955.
21
1 - The Formative Years Longing for Joy Ref.
Books Surprised by Joy They Stand Together
(letters to Arthur Grieves) Letters CS Lewis A
Biography
  • Top Ten Books That Influenced C.S Lewis
  • In 1962, The Christian Century magazine published
    C.S. Lewis's answer to the question, "What books
    did most to shape your vocational attitude and
    your philosophy of life?" Here is C.S. Lewis's
    list, annotated with hyperlinks to e-text
    versions of the works (where available) and to
    additional information about the authors.
  • Phantastes by George MacDonald
  • The Everlasting Man by G. K. Chesterton.
  • The Aeneid by Virgil
  • The Temple by George Herbert
  • The Prelude by William Wordsworth
  • The Idea of the Holy by Rudolf Otto
  • The Consolation of Philosophy by Boethius 
  • Life of Samuel Johnson by James Boswell
  • Descent into Hell by Charles Williams
  • Theism and Humanism by Arthur James Balfour

22
  • Top Ten Books That Influenced C.S Lewis
  • In 1962, The Christian Century magazine published
    C.S. Lewis's answer to the question, "What books
    did most to shape your vocational attitude and
    your philosophy of life?" Here is C.S. Lewis's
    list, annotated with hyperlinks to e-text
    versions of the works (where available) and to
    additional information about the authors.
  • Phantastes by George MacDonald
  • The Everlasting Man by G. K. Chesterton.
  • The Aeneid by Virgil
  • The Temple by George Herbert
  • The Prelude by William Wordsworth
  • The Idea of the Holy by Rudolf Otto
  • The Consolation of Philosophy by Boethius 
  • Life of Samuel Johnson by James Boswell
  • Descent into Hell by Charles Williams
  • Theism and Humanism by Arthur James Balfour

23
The Pilgrim's RegressIn Search of Joy Toy
garden made him aware of the beauties of nature
for the first time That was the first beauty I
ever knew. What a real garden had failed to do,
the toy garden did. It made me aware of
nature--not indeed, as a storehouse of forms and
colors but as something cool, dewy, fresh,
exuberant. Flowering Currant Bush on a Summer
Day - The Beauty of Nature Beatrix Potter book
Squirrel Nutkin - Fell In Love With Autumn
Poetry from the Norse god Balder Longing - Joy
as an unsatisfied desire which is better than any
satisfaction - The Stab of Joy April 1914 -
Meets Arthur Grieves (likes Norse Mythology - 47
years of friendship) March 1916 - Phantastes by
George McDonald Imagination was
baptized Rejected Christianity Philosophical
Progression Popular Realism - Philosophical
Idealism - Pantheism - Theism -
Christianity All joy (as distinct from mere
pleasure, still more amusement) emphasizes our
pilgrim status always reminds, beckons, awakens
desire. Our best havings are wantings.
24
That was the first beauty I ever knew. What a
real garden had failed to do, the toy garden did.
It made me aware of nature--not indeed, as a
storehouse of forms and colors but as something
cool, dewy, fresh, exuberant. Intense Experiences
From His Childhood Longing For Joy (Inconsolable
secrete the secrete we cannot hide and cannot
tell, though we desire to do both.) The Search
For Joy Becomes The Unifying Theme of C.S. Lewis
Life The Search for the inexpressible Sehnsucht
Longing, Joy , Beauty It was not until his
Christian Conversion that Lewis understood what
he was seeking Lewis found joy in Greek and
Nordic Mythology, Music, Literature, Nature,
Friends...
25
Joy (Sehnsucht) Myth and Joy (Sehnsucht) played
a central role in C. S. Lewis' pilgrimage to
Christian truth and in shaping his apologetics,
particularly his argument from desire. Far from
being separate themes, myth and joy were
convergent streams in Lewis' thinking and
experience that he so effectively presented in
his work to help people see the meaning and
sweetness of life in Jesus Christ. For Lewis,
real Joy found its uncommon expression in the
true Myth which became Incarnate and explains how
everything (experience, reason and desire) fits
together. Human imagination illumined by the Holy
Spirit brings real Joy and true Myth together to
picture Reality, which Lewis said is that about
which truth is . Lewis reached that stage in his
journey when imagination (the organ of meaning)
and reason (the organ of truth) were no longer at
loggerheads but became divinely given pointers to
something and Someone outside natural experience.
26
Joy (Sehnsucht) In Surprised by Joy Lewis
recounted an event which profoundly affected him
with a superabundance of mercy. He purchased a
copy MacDonald's Phantastes, a faerie Romance,
and began to read it on a train ride. Lewis
wrote "I did not yet know (and I was long in
learning) the name of the new quality, the bright
shadow, that rested on the travels of Anodos. I
do now. It was holiness. For the first time the
song of the sirens sounded like the voice of my
mother or my nurse...It was as though the voices
which had called to me from the world s end were
now speaking at my side...never had the wind of
Joy blowing through any story been less separable
from the story itself...That night my imagination
was, in a certain sense, baptized the rest of
me, not unnaturally, took longer. I had not the
faintest notion what I had let myself in for by
buying Phantastes."
27
"In speaking of this desire for our own far-off
country, . . . I feel a certain shyness. I am
almost committing an indecency. I am trying to
rip open the inconsolable secret in each one of
you - the secret which hurts so much that you
take your revenge on it by calling it names like
Nostalgia and Romanticism and Adolescence the
secret also which pierces with such sweetness
that when, in very intimate conversation, the
mention of it becomes imminent, we grow awkward
and affect to laugh at ourselves the secret we
cannot hide and cannot tell, though we desire to
do both . . . The books or the music in which we
thought the beauty was located will betray us if
we trust to them it was not in them, it only
came through them . . . Here, then, is the
desire, still wandering and uncertain of its
object and still largely unable to see that
object in the direction where it really lies . .
. Heaven is, by definition, outside our
experience, but all intelligible descriptions
must be of things within our experience. The
scriptural picture of heaven is therefore just as
symbolical as the picture which our desire,
unaided, invents for itself . . . "
28
"Creatures are not born with desires unless
satisfaction for desires exists. A baby feels
hunger well, there is such a thing as food . A
duckling wants to swim well, there is such a
thing as water. Men feel sexual desire well,
there is such a thing as sex. If I find in myself
a desire which no experience in this world can
satisfy, the most probable explanation is that I
was made for another world. If none of my earthly
pleasures satisfy it, that does not prove that
the universe is a fraud. Probably earthly
pleasures were never meant to satisfy it, but
only to arouse it, to suggest the real thing. If
that is so, I must take care, on the one hand,
never to despise, or be unthankful for, these
earthly blessings, and on the other, never to
mistake them for something else of which they are
only a kind of a copy, or echo, or mirage. I must
keep alive in myself the desire for my true
country, which I shall not find till after death
I must never let it get snowed under or turned
aside I must make it the main object of life to
press on to that other country and to help others
to do the same."
29
"A man's physical hunger does not prove that the
man will get any bread he may die of starvation
in a raft in the Atlantic. But surely a man s
hunger does prove that he comes of a race which
repairs its body by eating and inhabits a world
where eatable substances exist. In the same way,
though I do not believe (I wish I did) that my
desire for Paradise proves that I shall enjoy it,
I think it a pretty good indication that such a
thing exists and that some men will. A man may
love a woman and not win her but it would be
very odd if the phenomenon called falling in love
occurred in a sexless world."
30
"If we take the imagery of Scripture seriously,
if we believe that God will one day give us the
Morning Star and cause us to put on the splendor
of the sun, then we may surmise that both the
ancient myths and the modern poetry, so false as
history, may be very near the truth as prophecy.
At present we are on the outside of the world,
the wrong side of the door. We discern the
freshness and purity of morning, but they do not
make us fresh and pure. We cannot mingle with the
splendors we see. But all the leaves of the New
Testament are rustling with the rumor that it
will not always be so. Some day, God willing, we
shall get in. When human souls have become as
perfect in voluntary obedience as the inanimate
creation is in its lifeless obedience, then they
will put on its glory or rather that greater
glory of which nature is only the first sketch."
31
"It was valuable only as a pointer to something
other and outer. While that other was in doubt,
the pointer naturally loomed large in my
thoughts. When we are lost in the woods the sight
of a signpost is a great matter. He who first
sees it cries, Look! The whole party gathers
round and stares. But when we have found the road
and are passing signposts every few miles, we
shall not stop and stare. They will encourage us
and we shall be grateful to the authority that
set them up. But we shall not stop and stare, or
not much not on this road, though their pillars
are of silver and their lettering of gold. We
would be at Jerusalem.'"
32
Conclusion Lewis insisted that both true Myth
and real Joy are cosmic pointers to God. He saw
the work of apologetics as making use of what
innately we know about ourselves and the Reality
that is outside ourselves and then bringing them
together by reasoned argument and metaphorical
appeal. There is a goal and there is a way. It
is work that constantly points outside itself and
above itself to the Object of true religious
affections. Lewis works were not so much
concerned with the voyage but the landfall. Like
Lewis we too must address and balance appeals to
both head and heart in our defense of our faith
and present it in terms best understandable and
identifiable to our audience. As a point of
contact to many unregenerate, therefore, we could
approach the presentation of Scriptural truth as
the story of the Real Joy in the True Myth. Lewis
summed up what we constantly must be mindful of
when we are asked to give a defense for the hope
we have in Christ, yet with gentleness and
respect.

33
The Apologist's Evening PrayerFrom all my lame
defeats and oh! much moreFrom all the victories
that I seemed to scoreFrom cleverness shot
forth on Thy behalfAt which, while angels weep,
the audience laughFrom all my proofs of Thy
divinity,Thou, who wouldst give no sign, deliver
me.Thoughts are but coins.  Let me not trust,
insteadof Thee, their thin-worn image of Thy
head.From all my thoughts, even from my thoughts
of Thee,O thou fair Silence, fall, and set me
free.Lord of the narrow gate and needle's
eye,Take from me all my trumpery lest I die.
34
2 - The Pilgrim's RegressIn Search of Joy Ref.
Books Pilgrim' s Regress An Experiment In
Criticism English Literature Surprised by Joy
35
C.S. Lewis Life and Work Joy Through Reason,
Imagination and Faith Part 3 Story Telling
Living in Joy (What to read while you wait for
the next Harry Potter book) Reference.
Books Narnia Chronicles (Adult Fiction -
The Space Trilogy) Out of the Silent
Planet Perelandra That Hideous Strength Till We
Have Faces The Great Divorce Screwtape Letters
They say Aslan is on the Move Perhaps has
already landed
36
C.S. Lewis Making Pictures To forbid the making
of pictures about God would be to forbid thinking
a about God at all, for man is so made that he
has no way to think except in pictures. Dorothy
Sayers ". . . When people try to get rid of
man-like, or, as they are called,
'anthropomorphic,' images, they merely succeed in
substituting images of some other kinds. 'I don't
believe in a personal God,' says one, 'but I do
believe in a great spiritual force.' What he has
not noticed is that the word 'force' has let in
all sorts of images about winds and tides and
electricity and gravitation. 'I don't believe in
a personal God,' says another, 'but I do believe
we are all parts of one great Being which moves
and works through us all' -not noticing that he
has merely exchanged the image of a fatherly and
royal-looking man for the image of some widely
extended gas or fluid. A girl I knew was
brought up by 'higher thinking' parents to regard
God as perfect 'substance.' In later life she
realized that this had actually led her to think
of Him as something like a vast tapioca pudding.
(To make matters worse, she disliked tapioca.) We
may feel ourselves quite safe from this degree of
absurdity but we are mistaken. If a man watches
his own mind, I believe he will find that what
profess to be specially advanced or philosophic
conceptions of God, are, in his thinking, always
accompanied by vague images which, if inspected,
would turn out to be even more absurd than the
manlike images aroused by Christian theology.
Miracles
37
Lewiss Concept of Nature Spoiled
Goodness Lewiss Response to Nature 1
Romantic Appreciation and Idealization 2
Acceptance of the Supernatural The Experience
with the supernatural Lucys tale - several
hours in Narnia - less than a minute 3 Moral
Awareness of the force of evil in nature and the
temporal transient quality of our
world. Nature is more than a background setting
for the action of his characters Either there is
significance in the whole process of things as
well as in human activities, or there is no
significance in human activity itself. C.S.
Lewis, The Personal Heresy, 1939. Fresh
exuberance of nature (This is no thaw this is
spring) - Glimpses of Redeemed Creation Creation,
Fall, Redemption They say Aslan is on the Move
- Perhaps has already landed
38
Lewiss Concept of God The Coming of the
Lion "Do not weep. Behold, the Lion of the tribe
of Judah, the Root of David, has prevailed.Rev.
55 They say Aslan is on the move perhaps
has already landed And now a very curious thing
happened. None of the children knew who Aslan
was any more than you do but the moment the
Beaver had spoken these words everyone felt quite
different. Perhaps it has sometimes happened to
you in a dream that someone says something which
you dont understand but in the dream it feels as
if it had some enormous meaning either a
terrifying one which turns the whole dream into a
nightmare or else a lovely meaning too lovely to
put into words, which makes the dream so
beautiful that you remember it all your life and
are always wishing you could get into that dream
again. It was like that now. At the name of
Aslan each one of the children felt something
jump inside. Edmund felt a sensation of
mysterious horror. Peter felt suddenly brave and
adventurous. Susan felt as if some delicious
smell or some delightful strain of music had just
floated by her. And Lucy got the feeling you
have when you wake up in the morning and and
realize that its the beginning of the holidays or
the beginning of summer. The LWW
39
Lewiss Concept of Humanity Possible Gods and
Goddesses It is a serious thing to live in a
society of possible gods and goddesses, to
remember that the dullest and most uninteresting
person you talk to may one day be a creature
which, if you saw it now, you would be strongly
tempted to worship, or else a horror and a
corruption such as you now meet, if at all, only
in a nightmare. All day long we are, in some
degree, helping each other to one or other of
these destinations. It is in the light of these
overwhelming possibilities, it is with the awe
and the circumspection proper to them, that we
should conduct all our dealings with one another,
all friendships, all loves, all play, all
politics. There are no ordinary people. You have
never talked to a mere mortal. Nations, cultures,
arts, civilization--these are mortal, and their
life is to ours as the life of a gnat. But it is
immortals whom we joke with, work with, marry,
snub, and exploit--immortal horrors or
everlasting splendors. The Weight of Glory and
Other Addresses
40
Narnia Many Christian doctrines (Classical
Christianity) Doctrines fall into three
categories Nature, God, Mans Relationship to
Nature, God and his fellow man. Animal-Land (7-8
years old) The Narnia Series Different from
other Stories - Magic, Fantasy the Glimpsing
of Other-Worlds Stories -(1-4)London Children
being evacuated to the country during WW II.
Children Transported from this world into a world
faire-tale creatures belonging to a great lion
(four books on this scheme). The Lion The Witch
and the Wardrobe, - (5)The tale of two native
children of that world who are also chosen by the
great lion to serve the land of Narnia and to
know him in a special way. - (6)The beginning
of the world of Narnia - the intrusion of two
Victorian children into the newborn world begins
the complications which give rise to all the
later adventures. (The Magicians Nephew)
-(7)The end of Narnia (Last Battle) Each story
complete in itself - George MacDonald
stile. Fragmented - Strong unity of philosophy
and consistency of doctrine.
41
Narnia Myth Made Truth The Origins of the
Chronicles of Narnia In the process of writing
the Chronicles of Narnia, C.S. Lewis gradually
expanded the breadth and scope of his literary
ambitions. What was foreseen from the outset as a
collection of stories for children developed into
a complex depiction of an entire moral universe.
As the seven books progress, Lewis unfolds the
whole Divine plan for this universe from its
creation to its apocalypse. However, the
uniqueness of Lewis' literary achievement stems
from the fact that Lewis manages to do two things
at once. That is, he remains faithful to his
original intention to write stories for children
while adding in subtle moral and spiritual
complexities. These complexities do not seem like
authorial intrusions or editorializing. They are
instead woven into the very fabric of Lewiss
creative universe. Thus, the Chronicles of Narnia
are a series of books that can delight the senses
as they challenge and stir the soul. (Mark Bane)
42
Narnia
43
Narnia
44
The Magician's Nephew Digory Kirke (12) and
Polly Plumber (11) are children living in London.
After Digory moves in with his Aunt Letty and
crazy Uncle Andrew, he meets Polly and they do
some exploring. They make their way to Narnia,
the new world created by the Great Lion, Aslan.
They must save it from the evil witch, Jadis.
The book is usually numbered either first or
sixth, but some people recommend reading it
second The Main Theme Weakness to Power Key
Symbol Fruit of the Tree of Life Favorite
Quotes The Magicians Nephew and The Bible
(Colossians 19-17) Christ created and redeemed
the world. Paul prays for power in their
lives. When and Where in The Magicians
Nephew Chapter 1,2 London Chapters 3,4,5 Trip
to Charn Chapters 6,7,8 London Chapters 9,10,11
Narnia Chapters 12, 13 Western Wild Chapters
14 Narnia Chapters 15 London
45
The Magician's Nephew The Lion, whose eyes never
blinked, stared at the animals as hard as if he
was going to burn them up with his mere stare.
And gradually a change came over them. The
smaller ones - the rabbits, moles, and such-like
- grew a good deal larger. The very big ones -
you noticed it most with the elephants - grew a
little smaller. Many animals sat p on their hind
legs. Most put their heads on one side as if they
were trying very hard to understand. The Lion
opened his mouth, but no sound came from it he
was breathing out, a long, warm breath it seemed
to sway all the beasts as the wind sways a line
of trees. Far overhead from beyond the veil of
blue sky which hid them the stars sang again a
pure, cold, difficult music. Then there came a
swift flash like fire (but it burnt nobody)
either from the sky or from the Lion itself, and
every drop of blood tingled in the children's
bodies, and the deepest, wildest voice they had
ever heard was saying "Narnia, Narnia, Narnia,
awake. Love. Think. Speak. Be walking trees. Be
talking beasts. Be divine waters." (The founding
of Narnia)
46
The Magician's Nephew "Child," he (Aslan)
replied, "that is why all the rest are now a
horror to her. That is what happens to those who
pluck and eat fruits at the wrong time and in the
wrong way. The fruit is good, but they loath it
ever after." "Oh I see," said Polly. "And I
suppose because she took it in the wrong way it
won't work for her. I mean it won't make her
always young and all that?" "Alas," said Aslan,
shaking his head. "It will. Things always work
according to their nature. She has won her
heart's desire she has un-wearing strength and
endless days like a goddess. But length of days
with an evil heart is only length of misery and
already she begins to know it. All get what they
want they do not always like it." (The Planting
of the Tree)
47
The Magician's Nephew They looked and saw a
little hollow in the grass, with a grassy bottom,
warm and dry."When you were last here," said
Aslan, "that hollow was a pool, and when you
jumped into it you came to the world where a
dying sun shone over the ruins of Charn. There is
no pool now. That world is ended, as if it had
never been. Let the race of Adam and Eve take
warning." "Yes, Aslan," said both the children.
But Polly added, "But we're not quite as bad as
that world, are we, Aslan?" "Not yet, Daughter
of Eve," he said. "Not yet. But you are growing
more like it. It is not certain that some wicked
one of your race will not find out a secret as
evil as the Deplorable Word and use it to destroy
all living things. And soon, very soon, before
you are an old man and an old woman, great
nations in your world will be ruled by tyrants
who care no more for joy and justice and mercy
than the Empress Jadis. Let your world beware.
That is the warning." (The End of This Story and
the Beginning of All The Others)
Fledge, Polly and Digory
48
WHERE IT ALL BEGAN C.S. Lewis played in this
wardrobe as a child.
The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe The Main
Theme Frozen to Thawed Key Symbol The Stone
Table Favorite Quotes LWW and the Bible When and
Where in LWW 1. Lucy accidentally found herself
in Narnia 2. After a visit with Mr. Tumus the
Faun, Lucy returned to England 3. Edmund
accidentally found himself in Narnia and met the
Queen of Narnia 4. Edmund became addicted to
magic candy 5. Peter and Susan assumed that
Lucys Narnia was unreal and 6. All four
children found themselves in Narnia 7. The four
learned about Narnia while visiting Mr. And Mrs.
Beaver 8. Edmund sneaked away to betray the
others to the White Witch 9. Edmund made his way
to the Witchs castle and became captive
there 10. As the children and the Beavers fled,
Father Christmas arrived with gifts 11. The Witch
discover that her perpetual winter was beginning
to thaw 12. Aslan appeared, greeted his friend
ands knighted Peter 13. The Witch demand her
right to kill Edmund 14. Aslan gave himself to
the Witch ti die in Edmunds place 15. Aslan came
back to life 16. Aslan revived all victims of the
Witch who had turned to statues 17. The children
ruled Narnia for many happy years before
returning to England
49
The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe Daughter of
Eve (9,8) Romans 512 I should live to see
this day (68, 58) Luke 230 Wrong will be right
when. ..(74, 64) Mat. 1218-20 At the sound of
his roar. ..(74, 64 ) Hosea 1110-11 Sorrows
will be no more (74,64) Isaiah 6519 When
Adam's flesh and Adam's bone (76, 65 ) Genesis
223 They are tools, not toys ( 104, 87 ) Eph.
611-17 No need to talk about what is past ( 136,
I 12) Is. 6516 Deep Magic ( 138, I 14) I
Corinthians 25-8 He just went on looking at
Asian (138, 114) Hebrews 122 I should be glad of
company tonight (147, 121 ) Matthew 2638 I am
sad and lonely ( 147, 121 ) Matthew 2638 Let
him first be shaved (150,124) Matthew 2728
Jeering at him saying ( 150, 124 ) Matthew
2729 In that knowledge, despair and die
(152,126) Matthew 2746 Warmth of his breath.
..came all over her ( 159, 132 ) John 2022 A
magic deeper still ( 159, 132 ) I Corinthians
27-8 Asian provided food (178, 147) John
61-14 He has other countries to attend to (180,
149) John 1016
50
"Have you forgotten the Deep Magic?" asked the
Witch. "Let us say I have forgotten it,"
answered Aslan gravely. "Tell us of this Deep
Magic." "Tell you?" said the Witch, her voice
growing suddenly shriller. "Tell you what is
written on that very Table of Stone which stands
behind us? Tell you what is written in letters
deep as a spear is long on the fire-stones on the
Secet Hill? Tell you what is engraved on the
scepter of the Emperor-beyond the sea? You at
least know the Magic which the Emperor put into
Narnia at the very beginning. You know that every
traitor belongs to me as my lawful prey and that
for every treachery I have a right to a kill."
"Oh," said Mr. Beaver. "So that's how you came
to imagine yourself a queen -- because you were
the Emperor's hangman. I see." (Deep Magic from
The Dawn of Time)
The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe "Have you
forgotten the Deep Magic?" asked the Witch. "Let
us say I have forgotten it," answered Aslan
gravely. "Tell us of this Deep Magic." "Tell
you?" said the Witch, her voice growing suddenly
shriller. "Tell you what is written on that very
Table of Stone which stands behind us? Tell you
what is written in letters deep as a spear is
long on the fire-stones on the Secet Hill? Tell
you what is engraved on the scepter of the
Emperor-beyond the sea? You at least know the
Magic which the Emperor put into Narnia at the
very beginning. You know that every traitor
belongs to me as my lawful prey and that for
every treachery I have a right to a kill." "Oh,"
said Mr. Beaver. "So that's how you came to
imagine yourself a queen -- because you were the
Emperor's hangman. I see." (Deep Magic from The
Dawn of Time)
Lucy and Mr. Tumnus
Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy Pevensie were sent
away from their home, during the war, to the
house of an old professor. To pass time, they
start a game of hide and seek, because Professor
Kirke didnt mind them wandering around the
enormous house. Lucy is the first to discover the
secret of the wardrobe in the empty room, but
soon enough, the other children follow. After
they meet Mr. and Mrs. Beaver, the Pevensie
children learn of the White Witch and her spell
over Narnia, and they all decide to find Aslan
and save Narnia- or do they all?
51
The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe "Oh, you're
real, you're real! Oh, Aslan!" cried Lucy, and
both girls flung themselves upon him and covered
him with kisses. "But what does it all mean?"
asked Susan when they were somewhat calmer. "It
means, said Aslan, that though the Witch knew the
Deep Magic, there is a magic deeper still which
she did not know. Her knowledge goes back only to
the dawn of time. But if she could have looked a
little further back, into the stillness and the
darkness before Time dawned, she would have read
there a different incantation. She would have
known that when a willing victim who has
committed no treachery was killed in a traitor's
stead, the Table would crack and Death itself
would start working backward." (Deeper Magic
From Before The Dawn of Time) "Of course,"
said Aslan. "And now! Those who can't keep up -
that is, children, dwarfs, and small animals -
must ride on the backs of those who can - that
is, lions, centaurs, unicorns, horses, giants and
eagles. Those who are good with their noses must
come in the front with us lions to smell out
where the battle is. Look lively and sort
yourselves." And with a great deal of bustle and
cheering they did. The most pleased of the lot
was the other lion who kept running about
everywhere pretending to be very busy but really
in order to say to everyone he met, "Did you hear
what he said? Us Lions. That meant him and me. Us
Lions. That's what I like about Aslan. No side,
no stand-off-ishness. Us Lions. That meant him
and me." At least he went on saying this till
Aslan had loaded him up with three dwarfs, one
dryad, two rabbits, and a hedgehog. That steadied
him a bit." (What Happened About The Statues)
And I saw a strong angel, who shouted in a loud
voice "Who is worthy to break the seals on this
scroll and unroll it?" But no one in heaven or on
earth or under the earth was able to open the
scroll and read it. Then I wept because no one
could be found who was worthy to open the scroll
and read it. But one of the twenty-four elders
said to me, "Stop weeping! Look, the LION of the
tribe of Judah, the heir to David's throne has
conquered. He is worthy to open the scroll and
break the seven seals." Rev 52-5 And Aslan
stood up and as he opened his mouth to roar his
face became so terrible that they did not dare to
look at it. And they saw all the trees in front
of him bend before the blast of his roaring as
the grass bends in a meadow before the wind. The
Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
52
The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe "Is--is he
a man?" asked Lucy. "Aslan a man!" said Mr.
Beaver sternly. "Certainly not. I tell you he is
the King of the wood and the son of the great
Emperor-Beyond-the-Sea. Don't you know who is the
King of Beasts? Aslan is a lion--the Lion, the
great Lion." "Ooh!" said Susan, "I'd thought he
was a man. Is he--quite safe? I shall feel rather
nervous about meeting a lion." "That you will,
dearie, and no mistake,' said Mrs. Beaver, 'if
there's anyone who can appear before Aslan
without their knees knocking, they're either
braver than most or else just silly." "Then he
isn't safe?" said Lucy. "Safe?" said Mr. Beaver.
"Don't you hear what Mrs. Beaver tells you? Who
said anything about safe? 'Course he isn't safe.
But he's good. He's the King I tell you." "I'm
longing to see him," said Peter, "even if I do
feel frightened when it comes to the
point. "He'll be coming and going. One day
you'll see him and another you won't. He doesn't
like being tied down--and of course he has other
countries to attend to. It's quite all right.
He'll often drop in. Only you mustn't press him.
He's wild, you know. Not like a tame lion."
53
The Horse and His Boy Shasta escapes from the
land of Calormen with a Narnian warhorse, Bree.
Along with Aravis and her horse Hwin, they
uncover a Calormene plot to conquer Narnia and
must find a way to save Narnia and its people.
The Main Theme Slavery to Freedom Key Symbol
Living Water Favorite Quotes The Horse and His
Boy and the Bible Zechariah 17-17, 3, 46,
61-8, 78-10, 99, 912, 103-6, 131, 148,
1420 Isaiah588-11 John 414 When and
Where Takes place in 1940 English time and 1014
Narnia time. The four Pevensies have been
ruling Narnia for 14 years. Susan mentions the
recent planting of an apple orchard at pair
Paravel this will be recalled by Peter almost
1300 later, Narnian time, in the Prince
Caspian. The Horse and His Boy is the only story
of the seven Chronicles that does not involve
anyone journeying out of our own world.
54
The Horse and His Boy At that moment everyone's
feelings were completely altered by a sound from
behind. ... It was the same snarling roar
Shasta had heard that moonlit night when they
first met Aravis and Hwin. Bree knew it too. His
eyes gleamed red and his ears lay flat back on
his skull. And Bree now discovered that he had
not really been going as fast - not quite as fast
- as he could. Shasta felt the change at once.
Now they were really going all out. Aslan,
speaking to Shasta "I was the lion who forced
you to join with Aravis. I was the cat who
comforted you among the houses of the dead. I was
the lion who drove the jackals from you while you
slept. I was the lion who gave the Horses the new
strength of fear for the last mile so that you
should reach King Lune in time. And I was the
lion you do not remember who pushed the boat in
which you lay, a child near death, so that it
came to shore where a man sat, wakeful at
midnight to receive you." Shasta "Then it was
you who wounded Aravis?" Aslan "It was I."
Shasta "But what for?" Aslan "Child, I am
telling you your story, not hers. I tell no-one
any story but his own."   Corin "Hurrah!
Hurrah! I shan't have to be King... I'll always
be a prince. It's princes have all the fun."
King Lune "And that's truer than thy brother
knows, Cor. For this is what it means to be a
king to be first in every desperate attack and
last in every desperate retreat, and when there's
hunger in the land (as must be now and then in
bad years) to wear finer clothes and laugh louder
over a scantier meal than any man in your land."
55
Prince Caspian Troubled times have come to
Narnia as it is gripped by civil war. Prince
Caspian is forced to blow The Great Horn of
Narnia, summoning the help of past heroes, Peter,
Susan, Edmund, and Lucy. Now they must overthrow
Caspian's uncle, King Miraz, to restore peace to
Narnia. PC emphasizes education more than of the
other Chronicles. The Main Theme Fasting to
Feasting Key Symbol A Dorr in the Air Favorite
Quotes Prince Caspian and the Bible Psalm
148 When, Where and How Long 1. In the LWW Peter
was thirteen, Susan was twelve, Edmund was ten
and Lucy eight. 2. One year has passed in England
and it is 1941 there. 3. In Narnia 1303 years
have passed
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