RAISING HEALTHY CHILDREN On behalf of the Coalition on Children and Weight San Diego - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – RAISING HEALTHY CHILDREN On behalf of the Coalition on Children and Weight San Diego PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: 1cdde-MmRiY



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

RAISING HEALTHY CHILDREN On behalf of the Coalition on Children and Weight San Diego

Description:

Too much fat, sugar, & salt. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY. Physical Activity Guidelines ... Allow infants plenty of 'belly time' when awake. Provide safe items to play with ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:135
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 56
Provided by: lmcc3
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: RAISING HEALTHY CHILDREN On behalf of the Coalition on Children and Weight San Diego


1
RAISING HEALTHY CHILDREN On behalf of the
Coalition on Children and Weight San Diego
Visit us at www.ccwsd.org
2
Objective
Develop policies for your child care on
  • Handwashing
  • Physical Activity
  • Healthful Eating
  • Oral Hygiene
  • Breastfeeding

3
Childhood Obesity Statistics and Causes
4
Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1992
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 woman)
5
Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1996
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 woman)
6
Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1999
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 woman)
7
Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2001
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 woman)
No Data 2024 25
8
Obesity Trends Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2003
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs overweight for 5 4
person)
No Data 2024 25
9
Nationwide Health Crisis
  • The of overweight children has more than
    tripled in the last 30 years
  • 1 in 3 children are predicted to have Type 2
    diabetes in the future, 1 in 2 children if
    Hispanic or African-American

10
Nationwide Health Crisis
  • Deaths due to physical inactivity and poor diet
    are increasing
  • Children born in 2001 have a shorter life
    expectancy than their parents
  • 25 of children do not get any vigorous activity
    during the day

11
Children between 2 and 4 years old
  • In 2003, 16 of children ages 2-4 were
    overweight

12
50 70 of overweight children will become
obese adults
13
Health problems linked to obesity
Type 2 diabetes Heart disease Stroke
High blood sugar
High cholesterol
High blood pressure
Sleep Apnea
Some cancers
14
Why are more children becoming overweight?


Physical Inactivity
Poor Diet
Overweight Children
15
Obstacles to a childs healthy diet and physical
activity are
television
video games
computers
16
Screen Time (TV, computers, Game Boys, Play
Station, X-Box, etc.)
  • Young children watch up to 28 hours of television
    a week
  • Unhealthy snacks are consumed when watching TV
  • Limit TV viewing time!
  • American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)
    recommends
  • no TV viewing until the age of 2
  • less than 2 hours/day for all children

17
Fast Food
  • Portion sizes are too big
  • Fast food is everywhere
  • Not enough fruits
  • vegetables are being eaten
  • Too much fat, sugar, salt

18
PHYSICAL ACTIVITY
19
Physical Activity Guidelines for Infants and
Toddlers
  • When safety permits, encourage infants and
    toddlers to explore their environment
  • Allow infants plenty of belly time when awake
  • Provide safe items to play with
  • Promote play inside and outside, always
    supervise!
  • Modeling is important, play with the children

Source http//www.aahperd.org/naspe/
20
Physical Activity Guidelines for Toddlers
Preschoolers
  • Structured Activity (Play with a Purpose)
  • Toddlers at least 30 min.
  • Preschoolers at least 60 min.
  • Unstructured Activity (Free Play)
  • Toddlers at least 60 min.
  • Preschoolers at least 60 min.
  • Limit sedentary time to less than 60 minutes at a
    time

Source http//www.aahperd.org/naspe/
21
Physical Activity at Child Care Facilities
  • Provide parents with physical activity
    information and policies
  • Encourage staff to join in the activity
  • Use supervised free play and organized
    activities
  • Ensure equipment and activities are safe and
    age-appropriate

22
Physical Activity at Child Care Facilities
(cont.)
  • Modify activities for special needs
  • Involve all, dont play elimination games
  • Do not use physical activity as punishment
  • Emphasize fun, exploration, and cooperation

23
Children Need Physical Activity
24
Why is PLAY so important?
  • Its how children learn!
  • Intellectually
  • Socially
  • Emotionally
  • Physically

25
Importance of Motor Development
  • Children love and need to move every day
  • They are motivated to play and explore thus
    increasing their motor skills
  • Basic social skills are learned during play
    (sharing, taking turns, cooperating, etc.)
  • Confidence and self-esteem increase
  • Skills acquired transfer into adolescens and
    adulthood

26
?
?
?
?
What can YOU do to promote physical ac
tivity?

?
?
?
?
?
?
27
  • Provide opportunities
  • for physical activity and
  • play every day

What can I do to promote physical activity?
  • Create an environment for children to learn
    positive social skills and build self-confidence
  • Encourage all children to actively participate
    in age appropriate activities
  • Be an active role model

28

Healthful Eating
29
Why are HEALTHY foods beverages important?
  • To achieve optimal physical growth and cognitive
    development
  • To reduce risk of acute chronic diseases

30
Only 1 of children meet MyPyramid
recommendations
MyPyramid.gov
31
The childcare provider decides what foods are
served
Ultimately, the child chooses what to eat from th
e meal served.
Helpful Hints
  • Mealtime should be relaxed, calm, and enjoyable
  • Serve new foods often, try not to be repetitive
  • Keep a regular meal and snack-time schedule

32
Helpful Hints continued . . .
  • Use meal time to teach socialization skills
  • Sit with the children and eat the same foods
  • Allow children to serve themselves
  • Avoid choking hazards
  • Use utensils and dishes that are child-sized
  • Give small portions (2-3 Tablespoons to ¼ cup is
    child-sized)
  • Use food as educational tools
  • introduce cultures
  • color and texture identification

33
?
?
?
?
What can YOU do to promote healthy eat
ing?

?
?
?
?
?
?
34
Promote a Healthy Relationship with Food
  • Food should not be used as a reward for good
  • behavior or punishment for bad behavior
  • Discuss childrens special nutritional needs
    with
  • parents and staff members
  • Provide appropriate foods, be aware of food
  • allergies, and make accommodations as needed
  • Create an equitable environment, food should not
    be restricted because of a childs weight

35
Create a Partnership with the Parent
There should be clear communication and an
exchange
of information concerning
Food choices available to the child
  • The centers nutrition policies on
  • lunch
  • snacks
  • drinks
  • special occasions

Tips on how to promote healthy eating habits in
the home
36
Remember, YOU can make a difference!
  • Model a healthy lifestyle for children
  • Create an environment for children to learn
    about
  • healthy food choices and
  • discover food preferences
  • Encourage and provide access to healthy snacks
  • Communicate with parents about healthy snacks

37
Lets Wash Our Hands!
38
Hand Washing 101
Proper procedures
  • Wash childs hands in warm water careful, not
    too hot!
  • Use soap, lather for 10-15 seconds.
  • Make sure soap gets between fingers/under nails.

  • Dont forget the wrists!
  • Rinse and dry well with a clean paper towel.

39
Cleaning vs. Sanitizing
Cleaning actually takes the soil, dirt, and food
off of the surface.
All food contact surfaces should first be clea
ned thensanitized.
Sanitizing greatly reduces the presence of bacte
ria
and helps prevent disease transmission.
40
The Benefits of Breastfeeding
  • Babies were born to breastfeed!

41
The Benefits of Breastfeeding
  • Breastfeeding provides
  • Immunity factors which assists the infant in
    fighting off infection and diseases
  • Vitamins, minerals and enzymes which aid in the
    babys digestion
  • Bonding time between mother and child
  • Substantial savings

42
Some children who are not breastfed are
more likely to develop diabetes
60 more likely to have ear infections
25 more likely to become overweight
250 more likely to be hospitalized from respir
atory
infections
100 more likely to suffer from diarrhea
43
Breast Milk Handling
Label all expressed milk bags of each infant
with the
Childs name
Make sure to
Date the milk was brought to the center
Place in a refrigerator immediately
Wash hands before handling
44
Breast Milk Storage
Storage Guidelines
Use 2-4 ounce amounts to reduce waste
Cool in refrigerator before freezing
To Warm Breast Milk
Thaw and/or heat under warm, running water, do
not use a microwave to heat human milk
Swirl milk to redistribute the cream into the
milk (which is normal to separate)
45
Support Breastfeeding Mothers
  • Educate parents and staff about
  • Benefits of breastfeeding
  • Risks of NOT breastfeeding
  • Breastfeeding Resources
  • La Leche League
  • San Diego County Breastfeeding Coalition
  • Women, Infant, Children (WIC)

46
Support Breastfeeding Mothers cont.
  • Inform families of breastfeeding options
  • Encourage mom to breastfeed at your care place
    and to bring in pumped breast milk instead of
    formula (keep it cool in the fridge!)
  • Do not re-use formula or breast milk that is
    leftover (breastfed babies often eat more than
    formula fed babies)

47
Healthy Smiles are Part of a Healthy Body!
48
Proper Brushing
Encourage children to brush after
all meals and snacks
Provide assistance, young children have not
developed the hand-eye coordination needed to
brush teeth
Use a pea-sized amount of fluoridated toothpaste
Wipe infants gums with a clean, damp cloth afte
r feeding
49
Toothbrush Care
  • Label toothbrushes
  • Air-dry and store them in a sanitary location
  • Replace at least every 3 months or after an
    illness or infection such as strep throat, flu,
    or cold

50
Tooth-Friendly Snacks
  • Depending on age group!
  • crunchy or juicy fruits or vegetables
  • low-fat, low-sugar yogurt
  • low-fat cheese
  • beef jerky

51
Not So Tooth-Friendly Snacks
  • -candy
  • -cookies
  • -dried fruit
  • -crackers
  • -chips
  • -tortillas
  • -pretzels
  • -dry cereals
  • -sodas
  • -sugary fruit drinks

52
In closing.
53
Coalition on Children and Weight San Diego
Use us as a resource!
Visit us at www.ccwsd.org
  • Join one of our Coalition Workgroups
  • Child Care/After School
  • School Workgroups
  • Outreach and Education

54
References
  • 1. Bits Bites CACFP Nutrition.Physical
    Activity Guidelines for Infants, Toddlers
    Preschoolers. Available at
  • http//www.cdphe.state.co.us/ps/cacfp/news/trJune
    2002.pdf
  • 2. Caring for Our Children, National Health
    and Safety Performance Standards Guidelines for
    Out-of-Home Child Care, 2nd ed. American Academy
    of Pediatrics, American Public Health Association
    National Resource Center For Health and Safety
    in Child Care. 2002. Available at
    http//nrc.uchsc.edu
  • 3. http//www.fns.usda.gov

55
References cont.
  • 4. National Association for Sport and
    Physical Education (NASPE). Available at
    http//www.aahper.org/naspe/
  • 5. Position of The American Dietetic
    Association Nutrition Standards for Child-Care
    Programs. Available at http//www.healthyweightfo
    rkids.org/read/position.htm.
  • 6. Solving Feeding Problems with Infants and
    Children. Ellyn Satter, MS,RD, CICSW, BCP.
    Available at http//www.ellynsatter.com/Files/sol
    vingfeedingbrochure.pdf.
About PowerShow.com