MEMS Devices Examples of Design, Packaging and Production - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – MEMS Devices Examples of Design, Packaging and Production PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 1cca19-NzQ3O



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

MEMS Devices Examples of Design, Packaging and Production

Description:

SINTEF Microsystems and University of Oslo ... Perforated aluminum tube. IR window or filter. Thermopile or pyroelectric IR reference sensor ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:1118
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 46
Provided by: PerOhl5
Learn more at: http://folk.uio.no
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: MEMS Devices Examples of Design, Packaging and Production


1
MEMS Devices Examples of Design, Packaging and
Production
Picture shows a silicon microphone in development
by the start-up company 54.7
  • Per Ohlckers
  • SINTEF Microsystems and University of Oslo

2
Outline of talk
Picture shows details of the SP13 tyre pressure
sensor from SensoNor
  • Mainly a presentation of Norwegian MEMS
    activities
  • Main challenges of the Microsystem/MEMS industry
  • Examples of MEMS devices
  • Future and Conclusions A strong market pull will
    stimulate the needed maturing of the
    Microsystem/MEMS industry and its technologies

3
Applications for MEMS/Microsystems
  • The biomedical market
  • Blood pressure sensors
  • The space, defence and avionics markets
  • Accelerometers for rocket navigation
  • Micro gravity sensor
  • Gyroscopes for navigation
  • The agriculture electronics market
  • Automotive sensors used in tractors, harvesters
    etc.
  • The off-shore oil exploitation market
  • High pressure measurement in oil wells
  • Sea wave sensor
  • The automotive market
  • Acceleration microsystems for air bag systems
  • Tire pressure microsystems
  • The data and peripheral market
  • Disk drive write and read heads
  • The consumer market
  • Photo diodes in cameras
  • Level measurement in white goods appliances.

4
Market for Microsystems/MEMS Devices
Ref. Nexus Market report
5
Norwegian Microsystems/MEMS activities
  • Main players
  • SensoNor
  • SINTEF Microsystems
  • Startups
  • NORCHIP
  • Presens
  • Photonyx
  • Lifecare
  • 54.7
  • Universities
  • NTNUI, Trondheim
  • University of Oslo
  • New initiative NMC, Norwegian Microtechnology
    Centre
  • Picture shows the future Microtechnology Research
    Laboratory in Oslo, construction started this
    autumn

6
Example SP80 Pressure Sensor
  • Vintage from the early eigthies but still in
    production
  • Developed at SINTEF (earlier Center for
    Industrial Research), Norway and manufactured by
    Capto, subsidiary of SensoNor (earlier ame),
    Horten, Norway.
  • This sensor visualises the main features and
    limitations of micromechanical sensors, and
    points out pressure sensing as a main application
    for these kinds of sensors.

7
The SP80 Silicon Chip Set - Drawing
  • Consists of diaphragm chip sealed to a support
    chip which is mounted on top of a glass tubing
    acting as a mounting stand as well as a pressure
    port

8
The SP80 Silicon Chip Set - Picture
  • Consists of diaphragm chip sealed to a support
    chip which is mounted on top of a glass tubing
    acting as a mounting stand as well as a pressure
    port

9
SP80 Package, continued
  • Cross-sectioned view of the SP80 Pressure Sensor
    packaged in a transistor header with a top chip
    containing a vacuum reference chamber

10
SP80 Schematic
  • The SP80 schematic consists of 4 ion implanted
    piezoresistors in a full Wheatstone bridge
    configuration as the electronic sensing element.
    In addition, a temperature measuring resistor and
    a heating resistor are implanted on the same
    chip, to compensate or thermostat the chip to
    minimise thermal drifts

11
Picture of SP80 in Transistor Package
  • Comment The Norwegian coin is approximately the
    size of Ø10 mm

12
Top10 Success Factors
  • 1. Batch organised processing technology
  • 2. Microelectronics manufacturing infrastructure
  • 3. Research results from solid state technology
    and other related fields of microelectronics
  • 4. Micromachining
  • 5. Wafer and chip bonding
  • 6. Mechanical material characteristics
  • 7. Sensor effects
  • 8. Actuator functions
  • 9. Integrated electronics
  • 10. Combination of features

13
Bottom10 Limiting Factors
  • 1. Slow market acceptance
  • 2. Low production volumes
  • 3. Immature industrial infrastructure
  • 4. Poor reliability
  • 5. Complex designs and processes
  • 6. Immature processing technology
  • 7. Immature packaging and interconnection
    technologies
  • 8. Limited research resources
  • 9. Limited human resources
  • 10. High costs

14
Manufacturers of Microsystem/MEMS Devices
  • The industry structure is highly diversified both
    in size, technological basis and organisation
    type.
  • Traditional sensor manufacturers have seen
    micromechanical sensors as a natural expansion of
    their technological basis, and have taken up
    research and production of these sensors as a
    part of their activity.
  • Semiconductor companies have entered this market
    as an expansion of their integrated circuit
    activity, since they already have most of the
    needed equipment and the appropriate marketing
    channels.
  • System companies or original equipment
    manufacturers which see micromechanical devices
    as a way to boost their systems.
  • "Start ups", companies having micromechanical
    devices as their main business idea.
  • There are of course companies that does not fit
    into any of these types and some are someplace in
    between these types.

15
Example The 54.7 Photoacoustic Gas Sensing
Silicon Microsystem
16
Motivation
  • Microsystem technology can give cost effective
    photoacoustic gas sensors with high performance
  • Batch organised manufacture for low cost
  • Silicon micromachining for high performance and
    small size
  • Piezoresistive microphone for high-sensitivity
    sensing of the photoacoustic signal
  • Multistack wafer anodic bonding to produce the
    hermetic target gas chambers
  • etc
  • The start-up microsystem company 54.7 started its
    operation on September 1, 1999, with its first
    venture to commercialise this patented scheme for
    photoacoustic gas sensing modules using
    microsystem technology

17
Technology of 54.7
  • The 54.7 Photoacoustic Gas Sensing Technology
  • Using a silicon micromachined acoustic pressure
    sensor with an enclosed cavity with the gas
    species to be measured as a selective filter.
    This intellectual property is protected with 3
    patents.

18
Technology of 54.7, continued
  • Absorbed modulated IR radiation is converted into
    acoustic signal in a sealed gas chamber

19
Conventional Photoacoustic Gas Sensor
Power
Lock-in
Oscillator
Display
supply
amplifier
Valve
Microphone
Pulsed
IR source




Mirror
Microphone
IR-filter
IR-window
Valve
Pump
  • Well known with high performance at high cost

20
Photoacoustic Technology of 54.7
  • Increased amount of target gas present in the
    absorption path gives a correspondingly
    decreasing photoacoustic response in the sealed
    target gas chamber due to the transmission loss
  • Explain better! Include absorption lines etc!!!

21
Photoacoustic Response
Response without gas in absorption path
Emitter voltage
250
Emitterradiation
200
PA-signal
150
Output voltage from amplifier mV
100
50
0
-20
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
140
160
180
time ms
  • Decreasing PA signal with increasing gas
    concentration in absorption path. Here shown at 8
    HZ modulation.

22
The Diamond-like Thin Film/Silicon Micromachined
IR Emitter
  • Manufactured by Patinor Coatings
  • Based upon Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) thin film
    heating resistor on silicon micromachined
    diaphragm structure1 Bonding pads 23 SiO2
    4 Si3N4 5 DLC film
  • Using a CVD process to deposit the DLC thin film
  • Pulse modulated high speed broad band grey body
    IR emission
  • Working temperaure about 700-800 ?C
  • High reliability

23
CVD Process for the IR Emitter
  • Silicon-organic liquid (C2H5)3SiOCH3C6H5SiO3Si(C
    H3)3 (PPMS) is used as a plasma-forming substance
    of the open plasmatron
  • Doping by molybdenum is done during plasma
    deposition process wafer by magnetron sputtering
    of a MoSi2 target in argon atmosphere
  • Pressure is about 5?10-2 Pa, the magnetron
    current is about 2 A, the plasmatron arc
    discharge current is about 6 A
  • By changing those deposition parameters it is
    possible to modify the resistance of the IR
    emitters

24
Principle of a Microsystem based Photoacoustic
Gas Sensing Cell (Early Prototype)
10.0 mm
Silicon micromachined acoustic pressure sensor
chip
4.0 mm
Transistor cap
Target gas
TO-header
Absorption
Window
chamber
IR radiation
  • The photoacoustic sensing microsystem is enabled
    by packaging a silicon micromachined acoustic
    pressure sensor chip in a transistor package

25
Silicon Microphone Prototype
  • Designed by SINTEF and 54.7
  • Piezoresistive with centre boss structure
  • Manufactured by SensoNor with their
    Europractice/NORMIC multiproject wafer foundry
    services

26
Silicon Microphone Prototype Design and Process
  • Piezoresistive with centre boss structure
  • Chip size is 6 mm x 6 mm. Diaphragm diameter is 2
    mm
  • SensoNor/NORMIC process Process E/ MPW
    Combined Diaphragm- and Mass-Spring-based
    Piezoresistive Sensor Process
  • 3 micrometer epitaxial layer
  • 2-level etch stop using anisotropic TMAH process
    with electrochemical etch stop at 3 and 23
    micrometers
  • Buried piezoresistors with 480 Ohm/square sheet
    resistance
  • Anodic bonded triple stack glass-silicon-glass
    structure

27
The 54.7 photoacoustic gas sensing cell design
90 mm
IR-emitter
IR window or filter
Microphone
6mm
IR radiation Absorption path
Thermopile or pyroelectric IR reference sensor
 
Target gas
Perforated aluminum tube
  • Cell with silicon or electret microphone
  • Electret microphones model 9723 from Microtronic
    used in present prototypes

28
Sensor Module Design
  • Sensor module with the gas sensing cell mounted
    on a surface mount printed circuit board with
    analog and digital electronics for monitoring,
    control and interface
  • Size approximately 70mm x 20mm x 10mm

29
Preliminary Test of Silicon Microphone versus
Electret Microphone
  • Comparable signal-to-noise performance

30
Test of the DLC IR Emitters
  • Power efficiency about 0.1

31
IR Emitters Radiation Spectrum
  • Useful IR spectrum from around 1 to around 10
    micrometers

32
Main characteristics of the IR Emitters
  • Resistance value Nominal 55, from 35 to 125 Ohms
  • Supply voltage From 5 up to 12 V
  • Power consumption 0.5 1.0 W
  • Maximum frequency modulation of the emitted
    energy 200 Hz (100 modulation at 10 Hz)
  • Working temperature of film resistor 500-800 oC,
    with header temperature not exceeding 70 oC
  • Warm-up time lt 30 s
  • The emissivity factor of the emitting surface
    0.8
  • Emitting efficiency (?3-14 micrometers) 10
  • Life time Mean Time Between Failure (MTBF) of
    more than 25 000 hours (more than 3 years)

33
Preliminary experimental results of CO2 module
prototype
1
Temp
0.998
Vref
0.996
Vref-temp-c
0.994

Vg
0.992
Vg-temp-c
0.99
Vg-temp-ref-c
0.002 approximately 25 ppm CO2 1 oC
0.988
0.986
0
200
400
600
800
  • Graph of 15 hours measurement (one sample per
    minute) Lab test Increased CO2 at start and at
    inspection. Resolution around 0.3 ppm. Accuracy
    around 10ppm?

34
Status of this gas sensor development
  • The concept is promising for commercialisation
  • Low cost, high selectivity, and high sensitivity
    can be achieved
  • Example CO2 measured with around 10 ppm accuracy
    and 0.3 ppm resolution
  • Potential show stoppers
  • Long term drift and thermal effects
  • Example Some thermal effects are yet to be
    understood and minimised
  • Further work
  • Long term stability need to be verified further
  • Thermal effects will need to be investigated,
    reduced and compensated
  • Low cost microsystem production technology need
    to be further developed

35
Example Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) from
Texas Instruments
  • The device is using very advanced surface
    micromachining of thin Al alloys on Si substrates
    containing CMOS drive electronics

36
Picture of the packaged DMDs
  • The DMDs are pixel devices
  • Here are the VGA (640x480), the SVGA (800x600)
    and the XGA (1024x768) devices shown

37
Principle of Operation for the DMD
  • The hinge system of each pixel structure enables
    electronic control mirror position.

38
Picture of Digital Micromirror Device
  • The device is packaged in an elastomer connect
    package with a glass window. Here shown mounted
    on a PCB with back end drive electronics

39
The Davis DPX 16 Projector using the TI Digital
Micromirror Device
  • XGA resolution (1024 x 768 pixels)
  • 2.3 kg weight
  • 1000 Lumens brightness

40
Example The SP13 Tyre Pressure Sensor from
SensoNor
  • Fully integrated temperature and pressure sensor
  • Internal State Machine
  • Patented sensor design
  • Pressure sensorRange 50 637.5
    kPaResolution 2.5 kPaAccuracy /- 10 kPa

41
Example Microgyro from SensoNor
  • Challenging signal-to-noise ratio
  • High vacuum sealing to obtain high Q factor

42
PreSens High Pressure Sensors
  • Sensor concept
  • Silicon piezoresistive sensor element
  • High output signal
  • High overload capability
  • Dynamic range gt 130 dB
  • Pressure sensing
  • Full scale range 0 - 50 bar to 0 - 2000 bar
  • Pressure accuracy ? 0.05 FS
  • Temperature range
  • Standard T -40 C to 130 C
  • High T -40 C to 200 C
  • Temperature sensing by Rbridge(T)
  • Temperature accuracy ? 0.3 C
  • Signal conditioning circuitry
  • Customized steel housing
  • With or without diaphragm to isolate from
    aggressive media
  • Small dimensions (from 2 cm3)

43
Photonyx
  • Optical modulators
  • Main application Imaging systems like projectors

44
NORCHIP
microTAS (Total Analysis System) for biotech
applications
45
Future and Conclusions
  • A strong market pull will stimulate the needed
    maturing of the Microsystem/MEMS industry and its
    technologies
  • The Microsystems/MEMS industry is maturing into a
    separate industry
  • A lot of innovations taking place these days
    some examples have been presented
  • The Norwegian Microsystem/MEMS activities are
    promising growing
About PowerShow.com