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2006 Michigan Cancer Consortium

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Title: 2006 Michigan Cancer Consortium


1
2006 Michigan Cancer Consortium
  • Spirit of Collaboration Awards


Acknowledgments
2
Spirit of Collaboration Awards
3
(No Transcript)
4
Without bridges, the best-built roads lead
nowhere, the most impressive visions remain
invisible, and the best-laid plans fail. The
MCC is building bridges between organizations
that are collaborating to conquer cancer.
Congratulations to the following 2006 Spirit of
Collaboration Award Winners for building
bridges and making powerful connections.
5
Spirit of Collaboration Award Winners
6
Colorectal Cancer Early Detection Pilot Program
Great collaboration in an underserved area of
the State including a county with a significant
colorectal cancer mortality rate. - Reviewer
District Health Department 10 (DHD 10) and
Spectrum Health - Reed City Campus collaborated
to provide services as part of a colorectal
cancer screening pilot project funded by the
Michigan Department of Community Health. DHD 10
provided outreach, risk assessment, FOBT kit
materials, program planning, and coordination to
uninsured residents in Lake and Mecosta
Counties. Spectrum Health provided colonoscopy
screening, including physician services,
pathology services, and treatment services to the
uninsured project participants. Spectrum Health
also provided a liaison contact, which functioned
as a nurse case manager/patient advocate. Her
role was to ensure an efficient process of
scheduling, preparation, and follow up throughout
the colonoscopy procedure. This liaison also
served as the main contact person between the
health department and the hospital by assisting
with program implementation and billing
issues. Seventy-four (74) uninsured residents of
Lake and Mecosta counties received risk
assessment, screening, and education on
colorectal cancer, including screening for risk
factors and symptoms. Of the 74, twenty-one
received colonoscopies. Preliminary results show
a significant number of participants needing
polyp removal no cancer to date. In addition to
the clinical outcomes, this collaboration also
resulted in other numerous benefits. Through this
program and partnership, a strong basis has been
developed for continued screening efforts. For
example, this concept has been shared with the
Regional Cancer Steering Committee serving
Northwest Central Michigan. The committee is
developing a project proposal to provide broad
cancer early detection screening opportunities to
targeted communities. This proposal will be
submitted as a federal Rural Outreach Grant this
fall and will include screening for breast,
cervical, prostate, and colorectal cancers, as
determined by the committee.
Collaborating Partners
  • Spectrum Health - Reed City Campus
  • District Health Department 10

7
Digital Mammography Position Papers for Providers
and Consumers
This Collaboration was an example of how
important research information can be relayed in
a timely manner to the residents health care
providers of Michigan. - Reviewer
Members of the Breast Cancer Advisory Committee
formed a workgroup to discuss the results of the
Digital Mammographic Imaging Screening Trial
(DMIST) conducted from 2001-2005 by the American
College of Radiology Imaging Network. Dr. Murray
Rebner, one of the researchers who participated
in the study, was consulted to discuss the key
findings from the study and implications that may
impact mammography screening for Michigan women.
The workgroup then developed guidance regarding
mammography screening in the form of position
papers from the Michigan Cancer Consortium for
both providers and consumers in the state of
Michigan.  The April 2006 position papers for
providers (Digital Mammography Comparison with
Screen-Film Mammography) and consumers
(Frequently Asked Questions about Digital
Mammography) were posted on the MCC website and
distributed to providers and mammography
facilities throughout Michigan.   The provider
paper was downloaded 313 times from the MCC
website the consumer paper was downloaded 201
times. The position papers were referenced in a
May 30, 2006 Wall Street Journal article as well
as appearing in several newspaper articles in
neighboring states.
Collaborating Partners
  • Gerald Aben, MD - Michigan State University
  • Ray Demers, MD, MPH - Great Lakes Cancer
    Institute at Michigan State University
  • Sharolyn Gonzalez, OCN, RN - Sparrow Regional
    Cancer Center
  • Nancy Gregory, MD - William Beaumont Hospital
  • Mark Helvie, MD - University of Michigan
    Comprehensive Cancer Center
  • Bruce Matkovich - Michigan Department of
    Community Health
  • Stephanie Patterson, MD - University of Michigan
    Comprehensive Cancer Center
  • Murray Rebner, MD - Michigan Radiological
    Society, William Beaumont Hospital
  • Frank Vicini, MD - William Beaumont Hospital
  • Max Wicha, MD - University of Michigan
    Comprehensive Cancer Center

8
MI SmokeFree Apartment Initiative
All I can say is Wow! They made an impact from
the UP to SE Michigan! - Reviewer
For many years, local health departments have
received complaints from tenants in apartment
buildings on their exposure to second hand smoke,
but the health departments had very little legal
advice for these people. The MI SmokeFree
Apartment Initiative was implemented by The
Center for Social Gerontology through their
Smoke-Free Environments Law Project (SFELP), who
contracted with the Michigan Department of
Community Health's Tobacco Section in 19 of
Michigan's 83 counties in 2004-2005, in
conjunction with 10 local health departments and
their tobacco reduction coalitions. This
partnership matched legal advice with the local
health departments public awareness campaigns,
which included an award-winning website
(www.mismokefreeapartment.org), radio ads,
billboards, and postcard mailers, to reduce
second hand smoke exposure as well as provide yet
another reason to quit smoking. The MI SmokeFree
Apartment Initiative became a great success and
created an enthusiastic espirit de corps among
its partners in the local health departments and
coalitions. In the first 9 months, over 200
smokefree apartments were identified, many
landlords were assisted in going smokefree, and
many tenants exposure to second hand smoked was
reduced. In 9 months, the initiative
dramatically raised public awareness of this
issue in Michigan and began to change social
norms about people's rights to smokefree living
in multi-unit residences. In July 2005, new
goals for this project were set and
over-achieved.
Collaborating Partners
  • The Center for Social Gerontology Smoke-Free
    Environments Law Project
  • Chippewa County Health Department
  • Dickinson-Iron District Health Department
  • Genesee County Health Department
  • Ingham County Health Department
  • LMAS District Health Department
  • Marquette County Health Department
  • Michigan Department of Community Health - Tobacco
    Section
  • Ogemaw County Health Department
  • Public Health Delta and Menominee Counties
  • Washtenaw County Health Department
  • Western UP District Health Department

9
Network-Wide Colorectal Cancer Screening and
Education in Mid-Michigan
Wow! This is an extremely well thought out and
executed collaboration. This project seems
abound with cancer champions. The fact that they
explicitly set up the project so that they could
collect data was unusual all by itself.
Exceptional. - Reviewer
  • Representatives from the Great Lakes Cancer
    Institute (GLCI) - Bay City, Flint, Lansing, and
    Lapeer, the GLCI Director of Community Outreach
    and Education, the American Cancer Society, and
    Beckman Coulter Inc. collaborated to promote
    colorectal cancer screening and education in
    mid-Michigan. Major results of the collaboration
    included 
  • Development of a single screening education
    message that covered the majority of a 22 county
    area in mid-Michigan by way of radio and
    newspaper advertising and television and
    newspaper feature articles.
  • 444 people called to request a free FOBT kit by
    mail or to attend a seminar and receive a FOBT
    kit.
  • Personal contact (by phone, in person, or both)
    was made to 444 people in mid-Michigan regarding
    the screening process, FOBT instructions, and the
    importance of screening for colorectal cancer in
    order to prevent and cure this type of cancer in
    our communities.
  • 61.1 of the people that requested an FOBT
    completed and returned it.
  • Identified 12 individuals that tested positive
    for fecal occult blood. All are being personally
    followed and have had a colonoscopy or have a
    colonoscopy scheduled.
  • Next year, the collaborative will attempt to
    commit gastroenterology groups in each major
    market area to provide a specific number of
    colonoscopies per group for individuals that test
    positive on a FOBT and do not have health
    insurance to cover the cost of their follow up
    testing and care.

Collaborating Partners
  • American Cancer Society, Great Lakes Division,
    Inc. - Lansing and Flint Areas
  • Bay Regional Medical Center
  • Beckman Coulter Inc.
  • Great Lakes Cancer Institute
  • Ingham Regional Medical Center
  • Lapeer Regional Medical Center
  • McLaren Regional Medical Center

10
Patient Notification of Abnormal Pap Test Results
This is a very striking collaborative project
that accomplished what it set out to do find
out the feasibility and acceptability of
launching a patient notification project. The
findings of the project should open up the door
for other health systems to consider that there
may be gaps in their patient notification systems
which could be closed by implementing this type
of secondary notification system. - Reviewer
According to the Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention, 10-15 of invasive cervical cancer is
due to women with abnormal Paps who are lost to
follow-up. The Cervical Cancer Advisory
Committee (CCAC) felt that having labs contact
women directly about abnormal Pap results (rather
than assuming the clinician is doing so) might
encourage the woman to have follow-up diagnostic
testing. A subgroup of the CCAC designed a pilot
project in which a clinical laboratory contacted
women directly, in writing, of abnormal or
unsatisfactory Pap test results. Although process
data were the primary focus of the pilot project,
the team was able to document both process and
outcome data. The lab was able to notify 99.8
of women of their abnormal or unsatisfactory
results. The lab documented that 78 of women
with abnormal Paps (HSIL, AGC, SCC, AIS) had
appropriate follow-up pathology received by the
lab. In some of the remaining cases, appropriate
follow-up was done and not reported to the lab.
After implementation, about half of the providers
who provided feedback on the system said that the
pilot notification system probably or definitely
reduced risk to them as a provider. Although
there was mixed feedback about its value or
impact, 61 of responding providers said this
method of notification should be implemented on a
permanent basis.
Collaborating Partners
  • Carl Christensen, MD, PhD Detroit Medical
    Center
  • Samuel Hirsch, MD St. Joseph Mercy Health
    System
  • Mutjaba Husain, MD Detroit Medical Center
  • Carolyn Johnston, MD University of Michigan
    Comprehensive Cancer Center
  • Rachel Nosowsky, JD University of Michigan
    Health System
  • Maureen OHiggins, MS, RN American Cancer
    Society, Great Lakes Division, Inc.
  • Frances Pouch Downes, PhD Michigan Department
    of Community Health
  • Emily Volk, MD William Beaumont Hospital
  • Lauren Zoschnick, MD University of Michigan
    Health System

11
Spirit of Collaboration Award Honorable Mentions
12
Arabic Prostate Cancer Education Booklet
The project addressed a real need for material
in Arabic and can be used for any Arabic
population. - Reviewer
The prostate cancer decision aid, Making the
Choice Deciding What to Do About Early Stage
Prostate Cancer, was developed by the Michigan
Cancer Consortium Prostate Cancer Action
Committee (PCAC) using a research-based
developmental process. However, the PCAC
recognized that there is a very large population
of Arab men in Michigan and that Arab men develop
prostate cancer but often are not provided
information needed to understand their disease in
their own language therefore, they may not be
fully informed about their options. As a
result, Dr. Sakr translated and back translated
into Arabic the plain language decision aid for
men newly diagnosed with prostate cancer. ACCESS
recruited Arab men from the community to become
the models used in the booklet illustrations and
unveiled the booklet at the Spring National Arab
American Health Conference. A total of 250
booklets were distributed at the conference that
attracted a number of health care systems that
serve Arab Americans in South Eastern Michigan.
Both Dr. Sakr and ACCESS are working to
disseminate approximately 1,500 booklets to men
and providers who serve them throughout the Arab
community. The overwhelming acceptance of the
booklet among the Arab community is yet another
piece of evidence that involving individuals from
local communities in cancer control strategies
creates ownership of the endeavor and
community-wide awareness. As a result of this
collaboration, Arab speaking men in Michigan who
are diagnosed with early stage prostate cancer
now have access to a comprehensive educational
tool. This tool informs men clearly about
treatment options that are available and provides
an explanation of side effects and advantages of
each treatment modality and consequently allows
Arab patients to make an informed decision on a
timely basis.
Collaborating Partners
  • Wael Sakr, MD Wayne State University School of
    Medicine and the Detroit Medical Center
  • ACCESS Community Health Center

13
Body Soul A Celebration of Life and Healthy
Eating
The program is an innovative and effective way
to influence lifestyle changes to improve health
and cancer prevention in a special population
that can be replicated nationwide. - Reviewer
Body Soul is a health initiative to encourage
congregations to eat more fruits and vegetables.
Using evidence-based research, this program uses
a four pillar approach Pillar I Pastoral
Pillar II -Activities that promote healthy
eating Pillar III - A church environment that
promotes healthy eating and Pillar IV - Peer
counseling that motivates church members to eat a
healthy diet. The University of Michigan
Comprehensive Cancer Center, Progressive Baptist
Churches, Ford Hospital - Your Journey to
Wellness, and American Cancer Society (ACS) all
came together to support this program effort in
their respective areas. ACS implemented all of
the training, and the University of Michigan
provided training for the peer counseling and
physical activity component. Sixteen churches
and over 30 peer counselors were
trained. Churches implementing Body Soul are
seeing marked interest in the health of their
congregations. The churches are even planning
programs to educate their members on health
issues that most affect the African American
community. They are also setting policy to
establish a healthier church environment that
will impact these churches for years to come.
Collaborating Partners
  • American Cancer Society, Great Lakes Division,
    Inc. - Flint Office, Metro Detroit Service Center
  • Ford Hospital - Your Journey to Wellness
  • Michigan Steps Up
  • National Cancer Institute - Consumer Information
    Service
  • Progressive National Baptist Churches
  • University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer
    Center

14
CRAN of Washtenaw County
Excellent community participation and support.
- Reviewer
The Colorectal Cancer Awareness Network (CRAN) of
Washtenaw County is a diverse group of community
members, cancer survivors, worksite
organizations, universities, and health care
centers in Washtenaw County that joined forces in
2005 to raise awareness of colorectal cancer
screening guidelines and to increase early
detection of colorectal cancer. CRAN of
Washtenaw County developed a 45-60 minute
prevention and education program (roadshow) that
includes an agenda, power point slide show, quiz,
evaluation, and speaker notes. The following
eight presentations were conducted during March
and April 2006 Eastern Michigan University
(Ypsilanti), Business Professional Women
(Monroe), NSF International (Ann Arbor), Pfizer
Inc. (Ann Arbor), Frenchtown Senior Center
(Monroe), JC Penney Retirees (Monroe), Washtenaw
County Government Retirees (Ypsilanti), and
Brighton High School Media Center (Brighton).
Collaborating Partners
  • American Cancer Society, Great Lakes Division,
    Inc.
  • Blue Care Network
  • CareChoices
  • Colorectal cancer survivors
  • Community members
  • Eastern Michigan University
  • Healthy Asian Americans Project
  • Huron Gastroenterology
  • M-CARE
  • Michigan Association of Health Plans
  • National Cancer Institute
  • NSF International
  • Pfizer Oncology
  • St. Joseph Mercy Cancer Care Center
  • St. Joseph Mercy Health System
  • University of Michigan - Comprehensive Cancer
    Center, Program for Multicultural Health, and
    University Students Against Cancer
  • Washtenaw County Department of Public Health

15
Prostate Cancer Control Plan for Michigan
Truly a collaboration with so many health
systems, community orgs, and individuals. -
Reviewer
Over two years, a panel of prostate cancer
experts and advocates assessed progress made
since 1998, the current state of the science, and
the collective experience of the panel's members
to develop new prostate cancer control
recommendations to guide the Michigan Department
of Community Health and the Michigan Cancer
Consortium for the next few years. The Advisory
Committee on Prostate Cancer formed three
workgroups to focus on 1) primary and secondary
prevention 2) treatment and 3) survivorship
issues. Crosscutting issues of epidemiology,
accessibility, disparities, and genetics were
also considered. A goal was identified for each
of the three focus areas accompanied by specific
measurable objectives and strategies to achieve
the desired goal. Panel members worked together
to reach consensus on difficult issues such as
screening/early detection, genetics, and risk
assessment and controversies about watchful
waiting and late-stage treatment. The clear
consensus was reached that the greatest unmet
need was to address long term survivorship.  Prost
ate cancer remains a difficult disease to
address. It is possible to detect the disease
early, but there is no evidence that such early
detection will reduce mortality. When prostate
cancer is detected a man is faced with difficult
treatment decisions each of which leads to side
effects that need to be managed. Emotions run
high around each of these issues. The
collaborative consensus to focus on improving
quality of life for the more than 80,000 prostate
cancer survivors will re-direct local regional
and statewide activities toward a unified goal
guided by Michigan men and their families that
will benefit most.
Collaborating Partners
  • Ann Arbor VA Medical Center, Department of
    Medicine
  • American Cancer Society, Great Lakes Division,
    Inc.
  • Blue Care Network
  • Grand Rapids Community Oncology Program
  • Great Lakes Cancer Institute
  • Ingham Regional Medical Center
  • Karmanos Cancer Institute
  • Michigan Cancer Genetics Alliance
  • Michigan Department of Community Health -
    Michigan Cancer Surveillance
  • Michigan State University Center for Ethics and
    Humanities in the Life Sciences and Department of
    Medicine, Department of Endocrinology
  • Prostate Cancer Coalition of Michigan
  • University of Michigan Department of Medicine,
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Department of
    Urology, School of Nursing
  • Wayne State University Department of Urology
  • William Beaumont Hospital - Prostate Cancer
    Support Group

16
Wayne State University End-of-Life
Interdisciplinary Course
This collaboration shows that End of Life care
is just as complex and in need of
interdisciplinary teamwork as preventative
chronic medical care. - Reviewer
An interdisciplinary end-of-life (EOL) graduate
course was initiated in 2001 in response to an
identified need to address EOL education issues
in the Wayne State University (WSU) community.
The course was developed by a grass-roots group
(EOLIP) with a long-term goal of improving EOL
care in the Detroit Metropolitan area via
education and collaboration between academics and
service providers. This course is the product
of an ongoing collaboration of academics and
service providers representing 16 units of WSU
and a dozen care provider organizations serving
the WSU community. Begun as the WSU
Interdisciplinary End-of-Life Project, the
collaboration has now become a vital part of the
WSU Center to Advance Palliative-Care Excellence
(CAPEWAYNE) and has produced a number of products
including the graduate course and a book
(Gelfand, et al 2005) This successful graduate
(and upper division) course on EOL issues is
cross-listed by five university departments and
programs and is fully enrolled each time it is
offered. Student evaluations of teaching for the
course and other forms of feedback suggest that
this course has been life altering for many
students and growth producing for most.
Collaborating Partners
  • Hospice of Michigan
  • Hospices of Henry Ford and several other area
    academic and service programs
  • Wayne State University Center to Advance
    Palliative-Care Excellence (CAPEWAYNE),
    Department of Anthropology, Department of
    Sociology, End-of-Life Interdisciplinary Project,
    Library and Information Science Program,
    Interdisciplinary Studies Program, College of
    Medicine, College of Nursing

17
Acknowledgments
18
(No Transcript)
19
The MCC is committed to an environment of
creativity and innovation, tapping our resources
to explore new options, where everyday is a new
opportunity, where powerful waves begin as
ripples. Thank you, MCC Committee Members, for
your continuous innovation and driving the
Consortiums performance and growth. Without
change, the MCC cannot progress. And without
progress, there can be no future.
20
Board of Directors
  • Ray Demers, MD, MPH (Co-Chair)
  • Great Lake Cancer Institute at Michigan State
    University
  • Vicki Rakowski, RN, ET (Co-Chair)
  • American Cancer Society, Great Lakes Division,
    Inc.
  • Marie Beisel, MSN, CPHQ, RN
  • MPRO
  • Mark J. Bertler, CAE
  • Michigan Association for Local Public Health
  • Robert Chapman, MD
  • Henry Ford Health System
  • John W. Finn, MD
  • Hospice of Michigan
  • Adnan Hammad, PhD
  • Carolyn Johnston, MD
  • University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer
    Center
  • Marc Keshishian, MD
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan
  • Mary Noel, PhD, MPH, RD
  • Michigan State University
  • John C. Ruckdeschel, MD
  • Karmanos Cancer Institute
  • Aaron P. Scholnik, MD, FACP
  • Upper Peninsula Health Care Network, Inc.
  • Frank Vicini, MD
  • William Beaumont Hospital
  • Max Wicha, MD

21
Governance Committee
  • Constance J. Conger, MBA, RN (Chair)
  • Mount Clemens General Hospital
  • Mark J. Bertler, CAE
  • Michigan Association for Local Public Health
  • Robert Giffel
  • Genesys Hurley Cancer Institute
  • Adnan Hammad, PhD
  • ACCESS Community Health Center
  • Janice C. Klos, CAE
  • Michigan Academy of Family Physicians
  • Richard Murdock, MPH
  • Michigan Association of Health Plans
  • Vicki Rakowski, RN, ET
  • Charles H. Sherwin, MS, CPHQ, RN
  • Alpena Regional Medical Center Alpena Cancer
    Center

22
Membership Committee
  • George Sedlacek, MA (Chair)
  • Marquette County Health Department
  • Rick Hay, MD, PhD (Vice Chair)
  • Van Andel Research Institute
  • Marie Beisel, MSN, CPHQ, RN
  • MPRO
  • Robert Chapman, MD
  • Henry Ford Health System
  • Ray Demers, MD, MPH
  • Great Lakes Cancer Institute at Michigan State
    University
  • Susan Hoppough, PhD, RN
  • The Lacks Cancer Center at Saint Marys Health
    Care
  • Carol Rapson, MD
  • Dottie Rodriguez, APRN-BC
  • National Association of Hispanic Nurses, Michigan
    Chapter

23
Annual Meeting Planning Committee
  • Susan Hoppough, PhD, RN (Chair)
  • The Lacks Cancer Center at Saint Marys Health
    Care
  • Deb Bisel, RN (Chair Elect)
  • Spectrum Health Cancer Program
  • Leslie Algren
  • Deb Duquette, MS, CGC
  • Michigan Department of Community Health
  • Susan Dusseau, MA
  • Tobacco-Free Michigan
  • Mary East, MD, FACS
  • American College of Surgeons
  • Timothy Fitzgerald, MD
  • The Lacks Cancer Center at Saint Marys Health
    Care
  • Katy Munns
  • American Cancer Society, Great Lakes Division,
    Inc.
  • Maureen OHiggins, MS, RN
  • American Cancer Society, Great Lakes Division,
    Inc.
  • Tom Peterson, MD
  • Healthier Communities
  • Sam Silver, MD
  • Michigan Society of Hematology and Oncology
  • Judy Stewart
  • American Cancer Society, Great Lakes Division,
    Inc.
  • Mark Valaceck, MPH
  • Genesee County Health Department
  • Sally Webster

24
Communications Subcommittee
  • Gary McMullen (Chair)
  • American Cancer Society, Great Lakes Division,
    Inc.
  • Ray Demers, MD, MPH
  • Great Lakes Cancer Institute at Michigan State
    University
  • Susan Hoppough, PhD, RN
  • The Lacks Cancer Center at Saint Marys Health
    Care

25
Advocacy Committee
  • Judy Stewart (Chair)
  • American Cancer Society, Great Lakes Division,
    Inc.
  • Mark J. Bertler, CAE
  • Michigan Association for Local Public Health
  • Rick Bossard
  • University of Michigan Health System
  • Carol Christner
  • Karmanos Cancer Institute
  • David Finkbeiner
  • Michigan Health Hospital Association
  • Kelly Gasior
  • Karmanos Cancer Institute
  • Karen Holcomb-Merrill
  • Bill Mayer, MD, MPH
  • Michigan Primary Care Association
  • Connie McNeal
  • Sisters Network, Flint Affiliate Chapter
  • Vicki Rakowski, RN, ET
  • American Cancer Society, Great Lakes Division,
    Inc.
  • Jeff Towns
  • Michigan Hospice Palliative Care Organization
  • Lynn Weimeister
  • William Beaumont Hospital
  • Linda Wineski
  • Henry Ford Health System

26
Organizational Planning Committee
  • Charles H. Sherwin, MS, CPHQ, RN (Chair)
  • Alpena Regional Medical Center Alpena Cancer
    Center
  • Mark J. Bertler, CAE
  • Michigan Association for Local Public Health
  • Constance J. Conger, MBA, RN
  • Mount Clemens General Hospital
  • Ray Demers, MD, MPH
  • Great Lakes Cancer Institute at Michigan State
    University
  • E. Yvonne Lewis
  • Faith Access to Community Economic Development
  • Gary McMullen
  • American Cancer Society, Great Lakes Division,
    Inc.
  • Vicki Rakowski, RN, ET
  • Aaron P. Scholnik, MD, FACP
  • Upper Peninsula Health Care Network, Inc.

27
Ad-Hoc Funding Committee
  • Robert Chapman, MD (Co-Chair)
  • Henry Ford Health System
  • Frank Vicini, MD (Co-Chair)
  • William Beaumont Hospital
  • Ray Demers, MD, MPH
  • Great Lakes Cancer Institute at Michigan State
    University
  • Rick Hay, MD, PhD
  • Van Andel Research Institute
  • Susan Hoppough, PhD, RN
  • The Lacks Cancer Center at Saint Marys Health
    Care
  • John C. Ruckdeschel, MD
  • Karmanos Cancer Institute
  • Amy Slonim, PhD
  • Max Wicha, MD
  • University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer
    Center

28
Breast Cancer Advisory Committee
  • Lisa Newman, MD, MPH, FACS (Co-Chair)
  • University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer
    Center
  • Tara Washington, MD (Co-Chair)
  • Detroit Medical Center
  • Max Wicha, MD (Co-Chair)
  • University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer
    Center
  • Gerald Aben, MD
  • Michigan Radiological Society
  • Paul Adams, MD
  • Genesys Hurley Cancer Institute
  • Margaret Aguwa, DO, MPH
  • Michigan State University
  • Leslie Algren
  • Robert Burack, MD, MPH
  • Karmanos Cancer Institute
  • Lesley S. Dufner, MS
  • American Cancer Society, Great Lakes Division,
    Inc.
  • Deb Eggleston, MD
  • Michigan Department of Community Health
  • Linda French, MD
  • Michigan State University
  • Neal Goldstein, MD
  • William Beaumont Hospital
  • Sharolyn Gonzalez, OCN, RN
  • Sparrow Regional Medical Center
  • Nancy Gregory, MD

29
Breast Cancer Advisory Committee cont.
  • Hiam Hamade, RN
  • ACCESS Community Health Center
  • Mark Helvie, MD
  • University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer
    Center
  • Susan Hoppough, PhD, RN
  • The Lacks Cancer Center at Saint Marys Health
    Care
  • Marianne Lange, MD, FACS
  • American College of Surgeons
  • Bruce Matkovich
  • Michigan Department of Community Health
  • Elaine McIntosh, RN
  • Michigan Nurses Association
  • Sofia Merajver, MD, PhD
  • Janet R. Osuch, MD, MS
  • Michigan State University
  • Stephanie Patterson, MD
  • University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer
    Center
  • Dolores Rawlings, RN
  • Kalamazoo Black Nurses Association
  • Vanessa Reyes, RN
  • Providence Cancer Institute
  • Bernadine Sherwood, MSA, OCN, RN
  • Van Elsander Cancer Center
  • Connie Szczepanek, RN
  • Grand Rapids Clinical Oncology Program
  • Frank Vicini, MD

30
Breast Cancer Advisory Committee cont.
  • Karen Patricia Williams, PhD
  • Michigan State University
  • Julie Zenger-Hain, PhD, FACMG
  • Michigan Cancer Genetics Alliance

31
Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Workgroup
  • Max Wicha, MD (Chair)
  • University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer
    Center
  • Leslie Algren
  • Robert Burack, MD, MPH
  • Karmanos Cancer Institute
  • Linda French, MD
  • Michigan State University
  • Sharolyn Gonzalez, OCN, RN
  • Sparrow Regional Cancer Center
  • Hiam Hamade, RN
  • ACCESS Community Health Center
  • Susan Hoppough, PhD, RN
  • The Lacks Cancer Center at Saint Marys Health
    Care
  • Sofia Merajver, MD, PhD
  • University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer
    Center
  • Lisa Newman, MD, MPH, FACS
  • University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer
    Center
  • Janet R. Osuch, MD, MS
  • Michigan State University
  • Karen Patricia Williams
  • Michigan State University

32
Breast Cancer Digital Mammography Workgroup
  • Max Wicha, MD (Chair)
  • University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer
    Center
  • Gerald Aben, MD
  • Michigan Radiological Society
  • Ray Demers, MD, MPH
  • Great Lakes Cancer Institute at Michigan State
    University
  • Sharolyn Gonzalez, OCN, RN
  • Sparrow Regional Medical Center
  • Nancy Gregory, MD
  • William Beaumont Hospital
  • Mark Helvie, MD
  • University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer
    Center
  • Bruce Matkovich
  • Stephanie Patterson, MD
  • University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer
    Center
  • Murray Rebner, MD
  • Michigan Radiological Society
  • Frank Vicini, MD
  • William Beaumont Hospital

33
Cervical Cancer Advisory Committee
  • Carolyn Johnston, MD (Chair)
  • University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer
    Center
  • Nancy Berman, MSN, APRN, BC
  • Millennium Medical Group
  • Carl Christensen, MD, PhD
  • Harper Hospital
  • Frances Pouch Downes, MD, PhD
  • Michigan Department of Community Health
  • John Dyke, PhD
  • Michigan Department of Community Health
  • James Graham, MD
  • Genesys Hurley Cancer Institute
  • Samuel Hirsch, MD
  • Mujtaba Husain, MD
  • Hutzel Womens Hospital
  • Kristine Judd
  • Michigan Department of Community Health
  • Sharon Karber, RN
  • Michigan Department of Community Health
  • Trinka Klima, MS, CNM
  • Henry Ford ACCESS Clinic
  • Katie Macomber, MPH
  • Michigan Department of Community Health
  • Joseph Meunier, DO
  • Sparrow Regional Cancer Center
  • Mark Miller, MBA

34
Cervical Cancer Advisory Committee cont.
  • Maureen OHiggins, MS, RN
  • American Cancer Society, Great Lakes Division,
    Inc.
  • Anthony Opipari, MD, PhD
  • University of Michigan Health System
  • Divya A. Patel, PhD
  • University of Michigan Health System
  • Thomas Petroff, DO, FACOOG
  • Michigan Association of Health Plans
  • Jackie Prokop, RN
  • Michigan Department of Community Health
  • Barb Rivenburgh, RN
  • Mary Schubert, RN
  • Association of Womens Health, Obstetrics and
    Neonatal Nurses, Michigan Chapter

Mary Vallad, MS, RN Lenawee County Health
Department Michele Van Soelen, NP National
Association of Nurse Practitioners Patricia
Vranesich, RN Michigan Department of Community
Health Emily Volk, MD William Beaumont
Hospital Lauren Zoschnick, MD Michigan Section
of the American College of Obstetricians and
Gynecologists
35
Cervical Cancer Workgroup Reporting Pap Test
Results
  • Carolyn Johnston, MD (Chair)
  • University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer
    Center
  • Carl Christensen, MD, PhD
  • Harper Hospital
  • Frances Pouch Downes, MD, PhD
  • Michigan Department of Community Health
  • Samuel Hirsch, MD
  • St. Joseph Mercy Health System
  • Mujtaba Husain, MD
  • Hutzel Womens Hospital
  • Rachel Nosowsky, JD
  • University of Michigan
  • Maureen OHiggins, MS, RN
  • Lauren Zoschnick, MD
  • Michigan Section of the American College of
    Obstetricians and Gynecologists

36
Colorectal Cancer Advisory Committee
  • Anthony F. Shields, MD, PhD (Chair)
  • Karmanos Cancer Institute
  • Pamala Bardon, MEd
  • Great Lake Cancer Institute at Michigan State
    University
  • Jeffrey Brown, MSW
  • Colon Cancer Alliance
  • Mollie Burchett
  • American Cancer Society, Great Lakes Division,
    Inc.
  • South Central Michigan Area Service Center
  • Mary Anne Ford
  • Michigan Association of Health Plans Foundation
  • Laryssa Kaufman, MD
  • Michigan State University
  • Mark Mancinotti
  • Pfizer Inc
  • Laurence F, McMahon, MD, MPH
  • University of Michigan Health System
  • Maureen OHiggins, MS, RN
  • American Cancer Society, Great Lakes Division,
    Inc.
  • Brenda Pilgrim
  • American Cancer Society, Great Lakes Division,
    Inc.
  • South Central Michigan Area Service Center
  • Judi Suess, MD, MPH
  • Michigan State University
  • Sandy Summerfelt, RN
  • American Cancer Society, Great Lakes Division,
    Inc.
  • South Central Michigan Area Service Center

37
Colorectal Cancer Advisory Committee cont.
  • D. Kim Turgeon, MD, FACP
  • University of Michigan Health System
  • Tsu-yin Wu, PhD, RN
  • Healthy Asian Americans Project
  • Julie Zenger-Hain, PhD, FACMG
  • Michigan Cancer Genetics Alliance

38
Advisory Committee on Prostate Cancer
  • Ray Demers, MD, MPH (Co-Chair)
  • Great Lakes Cancer Institute at Michigan State
    University
  • David Wood, MD (Co-Chair)
  • University of Michigan Health System
  • Glenn Copeland, MBA
  • Michigan Department of Community Health
  • Laurie DeDecker, RN
  • Michigan Cancer Genetics Alliance
  • Deb Dillingham
  • American Cancer Society, Great Lakes Division,
    Inc.
  • Angela Fagerlin, PhD
  • University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer
    Center
  • Archilind Franklin, RN
  • Evelyn Gladney, MSN, RN
  • Ingham Regional Medical Center
  • Margaret Holmes-Rovner, PhD
  • Michigan State University
  • Maha Hussain, MD
  • University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer
    Center
  • Lonnie Johnson, MSW, CSW
  • Prostate Cancer Coalition of Michigan
  • Marc Keshishian, MD
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan
  • Robert Knobel, PE
  • William Beaumont Hospital
  • Joan Long, RN

39
Advisory Committee on Prostate Cancer cont.
  • Laurel Northouse, PhD, MSN, RN
  • Michigan Nurses Association
  • Claudia Parcells, MSN, FNP-BC
  • Isaac Powell, MD
  • Karmanos Cancer Institute
  • Brig. Gen. Michael J. Rice, Ret.
  • Prostate Cancer Coalition of Michigan
  • David Rovner, MD
  • Michigan State University
  • Howard Sandler, MD
  • University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer
    Center
  • Jerry Sims
  • Prostate Cancer Coalition of Michigan
  • Willie Underwood, MD, MS
  • Wayne State University
  • John Wei, MD
  • University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer
    Center

40
Prostate Cancer Action Committee
  • Angela Fagerlin, PhD (Co-Chair)
  • University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer
    Center
  • Laurel Northouse, PhD, MSN, RN (Co-Chair)
  • Michigan Nurses Association
  • Ray Demers, MD, MPH
  • Great Lakes Caner Institute at Michigan State
    University
  • Evelyn Gladney, MSN, RN
  • Ingham Regional Medical Center
  • Margaret Holmes-Rovner, PhD
  • Michigan State University
  • Maha Hussain, MD
  • University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer
    Center
  • Lonnie Johnson, MSW, CSW
  • Robert Knobel, PE
  • William Beaumont Hospital
  • Claudia Parcells, MSN, FNP-BC
  • Brig. Gen. Michael J. Rice, Ret.
  • Prostate Cancer Coalition of Michigan
  • David Rovner, MD
  • Michigan State University
  • Jerry Sims
  • Prostate Cancer Coalition of Michigan
  • John Wei, MD
  • University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer
    Center

41
Clinical Trials Research Data Managers Workgroup
  • Jeanne Archer, PhD, APN
  • Beaumont Community Clinical Oncology Program
  • Linda Beekman, MBA, RN
  • University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer
    Center
  • Beth Golden, RN
  • Karmanos Cancer Institute
  • Beth Lavasseur, MS, RN
  • Michigan Cancer Research Consortium
  • Tiffany Pearce
  • Henry Ford Health System
  • Cheryl Robins, RN
  • Great Lakes Cancer Institute at Michigan State
    University
  • Connie Szczepanek, RN
  • Joan Westendorp, MS, RN
  • Kalamazoo Community Clinical Oncology Program

42
End-of-Life Implementation Committee
  • John W. Finn, MD (Co-Chair)
  • Hospice of Michigan
  • Jeff Towns (Co-Chair)
  • Michigan Hospice Palliative Care Organization
  • Deb Dillingham
  • American Cancer Society, Great Lakes Division,
    Inc.
  • Lars Egede-Nissen, MPH
  • Hospice of Lansing
  • Jeanne Lewandowsky, MD
  • Kaleidoscope Kids
  • Peg Nelson, APRN, CHPN, BC-PCM
  • St. Joseph Mercy Oakland Hospital
  • Rachel Nosowsky, JD
  • Harry Perlstadt, PhD
  • Michigan State University
  • Kay Presby, MPH, RN
  • Stephanie Schim, PhD, CNAA, APRN, BC
  • Michigan Public Health Association
  • Maria Silveira, MD, MPH
  • University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer
    Center
  • Lauran Stuive-Bittinger, RN
  • The Lacks Cancer Center at Saint Marys Health
    Care
  • Sheila Vogel, ACSW
  • John D. Dingell VA Medical Center
  • Gwen Wyatt, PhD, RN
  • Michigan State University

43
Basic Lexicon Advisory Group
  • Aaron P. Scholnik, MD, FACP (Chair)
  • Upper Peninsula Health Care Network, Inc.
  • Gary Assarian, DO
  • Michigan Society of Pathologists
  • Timothy Fitzgerald, MD
  • The Lacks Cancer Center at Saint Marys Health
    Care
  • Rick Hay, MD, PhD
  • Van Andel Research Institute
  • Michelle Hulbert
  • Michigan Department of Community Health
  • Robert H. Knapp, MD
  • Spectrum Health Cancer Program
  • Steven Mandell, MD
  • John McPhail, MA
  • Project Manager, Lexicon Project
  • Renu Pandit, MD
  • Nat Pernick, MD
  • Michigan Society of Pathologists
  • James Richard, DO
  • Ingham Regional Medical Center
  • Chris Russell, CTR
  • Bixby Hospital
  • Wael Sakr, MD
  • Karmanos Cancer Institute
  • John Weiss, MD
  • Marquette General Hospital

44
Clinical and Cost Database Advisory Group
  • Glenn Copeland, MBA (Chair)
  • Michigan Department of Community Health
  • Cathy Bradley, PhD
  • Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Carol Callaghan, MPH
  • Michigan Department of Community Health
  • Ray Demers, MD, MPH
  • Great Lakes Cancer Institute at Michigan State
    University
  • Huda Fadel, PhD
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan
  • Charles Given, PhD
  • Michigan State University
  • Marc Keshishian, MD
  • Corrine Miller, PhD
  • Michigan Department of Community Health
  • Glenn Radford, MA
  • Michigan Department of Community Health
  • John C. Ruckdeschel, MD
  • Karmanos Cancer Institute
  • Ann Schwartz
  • Karmanos Cancer Institute

45
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