Pathways to Excessive Gambling Are young peoples approaches to gambling an indication of future gamb - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Pathways to Excessive Gambling Are young peoples approaches to gambling an indication of future gamb PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: 1b81b-NGNiN



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Pathways to Excessive Gambling Are young peoples approaches to gambling an indication of future gamb

Description:

78 per cent of the high school students had gambled for money at least once ... 32,9 per cent likely to gamble with more money than planned ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:94
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 26
Provided by: charlottef
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Pathways to Excessive Gambling Are young peoples approaches to gambling an indication of future gamb


1
Pathways to Excessive Gambling Are young
peoples approaches to gambling an indication of
future gambling propensity?
  • Dr Charlotte Fabiansson
  • Department of Sociology, Macquarie University,
    Sydney, Australia
  • Email Charlotte.Fabiansson_at_scmp.mq.edu.au

2
Research framework
  • Question
  • if future gambling propensity can be identified
    among young peoples attitudes to gambling
    activities
  • the role of the youths social and cultural
    environment
  • family environment
  • social entertainment environment
  • gambling environment

3
Explored objectives
  • the manner of introduction to gambling activities
  • social recreational activities
  • students interest in gambling activities
  • reactions to losing money on gambling
  • gambling above available funds
  • the influence of social and cultural capital
  • family tradition
  • young peoples self-perception, feelings of
    social inclusion
  • community affiliation

4
Perceptions of young peoples abilities to
influence their future
  • Young peoples ability to
  • internalise social and cultural capital from the
    family milieu and from the surrounding community
    environment (Bourdieu 1986, 1993)
  • to adopt an objective perspective on their
    self-development, adaptation and change
  • both be producers and products of social systems
    (Caprara, Pastorelli, Regalia, Scabini, and
    Bandura 2005 72 Bandura 1986 2001 Caprara and
    Cervone 2000)

5
Definition of gambling
  • Gambling for money
  • staking of money on the outcome of games or
    events involving chance or skill (Slade and
    McConville 2003 2)
  • Gambling features
  • the element of risk,
  • the possibility to win, lose or status quo,
  • a social or co-operative activity where making a
    bet involves gambling against something, a
    person, activity or machine,
  • a deliberate activity that a person is taking
    part in on a voluntary basis (Smith and Wynne
    2002 17)

6
Scope of gambling in Australia
  • Annually
  • eight out of ten adult Australians gamble for
    money (legal for people 18 years of age and
    older)
  • two out of five gamble regularly
  • one in five gamble periodically at an
    unsustainable level (Productivity Commission
    1999)
  • for every excessive gambler another ten people
    close to the gambler (family, friends and work
    colleagues) are affected by the gambling
  • Most addictive gambling form -electronic gaming
    machines (poker or slot machines)

7
Gamblers profile
  • The regular adult gambler is
  • likely to be
  • male
  • a young person (18 - 34 years) or
  • a mature person (50-64 years)
  • single
  • live outside a metropolitan area
  • born in Australia
  • less likely to
  • have a university education,
  • be working in a full time salary position,
  • have an above average income,
  • (Productivity Commission 1999 3.18-19)

8
Background - Youth Sample
  • Youth sample
  • 751 high school students aged 14-21 years
  • Survey
  • self administered questionnaire, during school
    time
  • Sub-sample (N368),
  • Young people who classified their gambling
    pursuits
  • 66.8 per cent social gamblers (N246)
  • 70.9 per cent females
  • 62.1 per cent males
  • 33.3 per cent competitive gamblers (N122)
  • 29.1 per cent females
  • 37.9 per cent males

9
Background - Adult Sample
  • Adult sample
  • 21 case studies
  • 57.1 per cent (12 females)
  • 42.9 per cent (9 males)
  • age range 21 to 65 years
  • Information collated by gambling counsellors
  • The youth and the adult research are explorative
    in nature

10
Youth sample
  • Research question
  • The table below lists many different forms of
    wagering and gaming activities some of them can
    be played in your local community others can be
    undertaken over the internet or in the bigger
    cities. We would like to know which gambling
    activities you have participated in during the
    last 5 years.
  • Youths gambling experiences
  • 78 per cent of the high school students had
    gambled for money at least once during the last
    five years (Fabiansson 2006 350)

11
Gambling propensity - social and cultural capital
  • Gambling environment
  • young peoples gambling undertaken in
    collaboration with parents
  • within a family entertainment situation
  • parents act as proxies for their children
  • parents undertake the financial transaction by
    purchasing gambling products (e.g. lotteries and
    wagering) (Fabiansson 2006 cf. Griffiths 1998)

12
Gambling venues - social environment
  • Gambling facilities
  • local sports clubs in lower socio-economic areas
  • the gambling area
  • by law separated from the main dining area,
  • social entertainment
  • restricted choices
  • affordable entertainment
  • families and friends socialise at the community
    sports club
  • the children play keno or other gambling games
    for money (organised by the parents)
  • gambling pursuits
  • an integrated part of the social entertainment
  • children are introduced to gambling in a
    protective and family friendly social
    environment.

13
Gambling scope
  • Being upset about losing money
  • social gamblers
  • 14.0 per cent being upset about losing money
  • 38.3 per cent more likely to loose more money
    than anticipated
  • 52.2 per cent would spend less than five dollars
    during an evening
  • 6.7 per cent likely to gamble with more money
    than planned
  • competitive gamblers
  • 41.7 per cent being upset about losing money
  • 57. 8 per cent more likely to loose more money
    than anticipated
  • 26.1 per cent would spend less than five dollars
    during an evening
  • 32,9 per cent likely to gamble with more money
    than planned
  • Differences significant otherwise noted

14
Gambling scope
15
Social exclusion and community affiliation
  • feeling at home in the communities
  • social gamblers
  • 15.4 per cent did not feel at home in the
    community
  • 18.4 per cent females
  • 11.4 per cent males
  • competitive gamblers
  • 33.6 per cent did not feel at home in the
    community
  • 36.8 per cent females
  • 30.6 per cent males
  • not members of any community organisation
  • social gamblers - 22.4 per cent
  • competitive gamblers - 39.3 per cent were

16
Social exclusion and community affiliation - not
feeling at home in the communities
17
Get help from friends
  • can count on help from friends
  • social gamblers
  • 89.8 per cent could count on help from friends
  • 91.5 per cent of the females
  • 87.6 per cent of the males
  • competitive gambles
  • 72.7 per cent could count on help from friends
  • 70.7 per cent of the females
  • 74.6 per cent of the males

18
Feeling safe in the local community
  • Feeling safe
  • safe in the community during the day
  • 55.3 per cent social gamblers
  • 41.0 per cent competitive gamblers
  • safe in the community after dark
  • 15 per cent of social and completive felt very
    safe in the communities after dark (Fabiansson
    2007b)

19
Telephone contact
  • Telephone contact with friends the day before the
    research day
  • 39.4 per cent social gamblers
  • 57 per cent competitive gamblers
  • even if the competitive gamblers were presenting
    themselves as less settled in the communities
    they were more inclined to telephone friends than
    the social gamblers
  • significant difference low

20
Youth vs adult sample
  • Youth sample
  • Young people introduces by family and friends
  • Gambling place
  • the local sports club
  • a social recreational activity
  • a safe family friendly atmosphere
  • Adult sample
  • Introduce as young people by family and friends
  • Gambling place
  • the local sports club
  • a social recreational activity
  • a safe family friendly atmosphere

21
Youth vs adult sample
  • Youth sample
  • Competitive gambler
  • start at a young age
  • gambling for winning - not social entertainment
  • focus on the win not the loss to gain the win
  • possible that gambling is compensating for lack
    of status among friends or in society (school or
    sports)
  • Adult sample
  • Excessive gambler
  • start at a young age
  • gambling for winning - not social entertainment
  • focus on the win not the loss to gain the win
  • gambling compensate for lack of status within the
    family, among friends and/ or in society
    (relationship problems)

22
Youth vs adult sample
  • Youth sample
  • Competitive gambler
  • social isolation - less sure of friends support
  • less involvement in community social events
  • Adult sample
  • Excessive gambler
  • social isolation depending on individual
    circumstances (borrowed money)
  • less involvement in community social events as
    gambling consumes free time

23
Conclusion
  • Young adult gamblers
  • introduced to gambling activities by family and
    friends as social entertainment
  • majority continue to be social gamblers,
  • others start excessive gambling
  • the social gambling develops into competitive
    gambling
  • gamble to win
  • losing only bad luck
  • regularly gamble above accessible funds - until
    all money are gone, owned and borrowed
  • live in residential areas with high access to
    gambling venues
  • low access to other affordable entertainment

24
Social indicators
  • Are young peoples approaches to gambling an
    indication of future gambling propensity?

25
Pathways to Excessive Gambling Are young
peoples approaches to gambling an indication of
future gambling propensity?
  • Dr Charlotte Fabiansson
  • Department of Sociology, Macquarie University,
    Sydney, Australia
  • Email Charlotte.Fabiansson_at_scmp.mq.edu.au
About PowerShow.com