Idea Outlines - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Idea Outlines PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: 1b205-Y2QwN



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Idea Outlines

Description:

Most weeks you will have an Idea Outline due. ... The Idea Outline is set up in a form that you can download at: ... In this case, you should be using your ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:70
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 27
Provided by: zia8
Category:
Tags: idea | outlines | you

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Idea Outlines


1
Idea Outlines
  • English 1302

2
  • Most weeks you will have an Idea Outline due. 
    The main point behind an idea outline is to get
    you to think about the work you're looking at and
    make an argument about it.  The Idea Outline is
    set up in a form that you can download at
  • http//www.zianet.com/kelliwm/Idea_Outline_Form.rt
    f
  • I suggest you save the file, and each time you do
    an outline, save it using "save as," and give it
    a new title, for example IdeaOulineFrost.rtf. 
    This way you can always go back to the original
    document and not have to erase what you write
    before.

3
First, we have to think about the general
structure of writings about literature.
Basically, most critical writings about
literature a structured like this
  • Introduction
  • Sets the context by sharing the general topic.
    Ie something specific about the human condition,
    character, or certain situations
  • Provides the name of the author and title of the
    work, properly formatted. (Often this is in
    conjunction with the thesis.)
  • Provides a clear thesis, that can be checked by
    answering the following questions

4
Thesis checklist
  • Does the thesis go beyond an apparent fact or
    conclusion from the story?
  • Is the thesis arguable?
  • Is the thesis supportable with specific (direct
    quotes or very specific) examples from the story?
  • Is the thesis related to an element of fiction?

5
Body
  • The body of the essay should work to explain and
    illustrate the main point made in the thesis.
    With each point you make, you should
  • Provide specific reasons for your belief in your
    thesis.
  • Support those beliefs with evidence from the
    text direct quotes, paraphrases, or very
    specific examples.
  • Interpret the evidence youve given explain how
    the evidence shows or illustrates the reason.
  • Connect the evidence and interpretation to the
    thesis. Make sure to explain how this specific
    moment plays a role in or supports the thesis.
  • Sometimes the last two points will be merged.

6
Conclusion
  • The conclusion should bring the paper together.
    Options for this include
  • Discussion of how the specific examples add up to
    illustrate something more about the general topic
    set up in the introduction.
  • OR
  • Discussion of how the work gives us a deeper
    understanding of the human condition, character
    or situations through the authors use of the
    particular element.

7
Where to start
  • When you start to get ideas for an essay, the
    best place to start may not always be at the
    beginning.
  • Sometimes you may know exactly what you want to
    talk about (you may be blessed with a working
    thesis) if so, then you can start with
    developing your thesis.
  • For example, if you have been given a question to
    answer about a story, then the answer to that
    question is your thesis.
  • You can work through the outline beginning with
    your thesis, then go back and develop your
    introduction to round it out.

8
  • However, it doesnt always happen that way. If
    youre working with a wide open choice of what to
    write about, the first thing you want to
    familiarize yourself with are the basic elements
    of literature and how they work.
  • In your literature textbook there are chapters
    that deal with each element (plot, character,
    setting, etc.). At the beginning of the chapter
    is a discussion of the basic workings of the
    element at the end of the chapter is a
    discussion of how to write about the element.
  • In this case, you should be using your literature
    book as a reference tool. We will of course
    discuss these elements in our course, but each of
    you will select different things to write about
    so should review the specifics on your own.

9
Starting with Evidence
  • If you find a specific element stands out for you
    in a story or a poem, think about what it is that
    makes it work or makes it unique in the story.
  • For example, you might decide that you want to
    look carefully at setting and how it relates to
    character in Greasy Lake. After reviewing the
    discussions of setting and character in fiction
    as discussed in your literature book, you are
    ready to go.
  • One of the easiest places to start is with
    evidence. You can go through and find places in
    the story that the setting seems to play a role
    in showing the characters or compares to them.
  • Here are a few quotes Ive found that might work

10
The characters
  • We were dangerous characters then. We wore
    torn-up leather jackets, slouched around with
    toothpicks in our mouths, sniffed glue and either
    and what somebody claimed was cocaine. When we
    wheeled our parents whining station wagons out
    onto the street we left a patch of rubber half a
    block long. We drank gin and grape juice, Tango,
    Thunderbird, and Bali Hai. We were nineteen. We
    were bad. We read Andre Gide and struck
    elaborate poses to show that we didnt give a
    shit about anything (120-1).

11
The lake
  • Fetid and murky, the mud banks glittering with
    broken glass and strewn with beer cans and the
    charred remains of bonfires. There was a single
    ravaged island a hundred yards from shore, so
    stripped of vegetation it looked as if the air
    force had strafed it (121).
  • (The numbers in parenthesis are my in-text
    citation. It shows the page number where I read
    the information. See pages 370-373 in you
    Writers Reference for instructions on how to do
    this.)

12
  • However, I can't just throw it out there in
    between my sentences and think it's clearly
    related and that my point will be evident to my
    reader.
  • Instead I need to blend it with a sentence that
    places it in context, considering cutting out
    those details I won't need, or at least
    summarizing them. I might do that like so

13
  • At the first of the story, the narrator describes
    himself and his friends as dangerous
    characters, and he talks about their drinking
    cheap alcohol, sniffing glue, taking drugs, and
    driving their parents cars recklessly (121-0).
    Similarly, he describes the lake with a dim view,
    saying it was fetid and murky, the mud banks
    glittering with broken glass and strewn with beer
    cans and the charred remains of bonfires. There
    was a single ravaged island a hundred yards from
    shore, so stripped of vegetation it looked as if
    the air force had strafed it (120-1).

14
  • First I've summarized or paraphrased much of the
    quote I selected to use. Use only the details
    that support your point. Also, in the second
    half of the sentence, I've blended my words with
    the authors, but am careful to show where his
    begin with the use of quotation marks. The
    general rule of thumb is if you use three or more
    words sequentially as they appear in the text you
    use quotation marks.

15
Discussion/Interpretation
  • If you don't explain how that evidence shows or
    illustrates your points, then you've left your
    ideas out of the work.  So, I ask what this shows
    me about my these characters as revealed through
    the setting.  I would answer that by saying

16
  • From the start, its clear that both these
    teenagers and this lake dont have an outward
    appearance that is the clean freshness often
    associated with both youth and nature.
  • In essence, I'm telling you what I read between
    the lines when I read these quotes.  Now there's
    just one more step, then we'll take a look at how
    this process comes together.

17
Connecting
  • As you work with each reason, your connection
    should show the role it plays in your thesis. If
    you dont have a thesis yet, think about how the
    evidence and interpretation illustrates some main
    idea. Heres an example of what I might say about
    the quote and my interpretation

18
  • While we are used to authors describing
    characters or using characters descriptions to
    give us clues as to who the characters really
    are, the use of setting to reflect that gives us
    a deeper understanding of the place from which
    these young men begin in this story, illustrating
    their attitudes and viewpoints.

19
  • Here I've shown not only how Boyle uses character
    at the beginning of the story, but how that
    character mirrors who these young men are. 
  • While this one paragraph does not illustrate the
    whole of the thesis, and it shouldn't, it sets
    the stage for the readers.

20
Thesis
  • To develop your thesisif youre working from
    evidence firsttake a look at your evidence and
    discussion/interpretation together. What does it
    point out about that main topic, here character
    and setting?
  • To put this together for your reading pleasure, I
    had to go through Greasy Lake and look for
    other points about character and setting. When I
    put those together with the one Ive shown you
    here, I came up with this thesis

21
  • In Greasy Lake, by T. Coraghessan Boyle, the
    setting mirrors the changes the narrator goes
    through, and by looking closely at it we can see
    more deeply into the narrators transition from
    boyhood to manhood.

22
  • While the single example Ive given you above,
    does not reveal all of the ideas in the thesis,
    other parts of the work do. Ive made sure that
    my thesis fits the thesis criteria
  •  
  • its not a simple fact or basic conclusion from
    the reading,
  • its arguable and supportable, and
  • its linked to literary ideas.

23
Beyond The Idea Outline
  • While your idea outlines are homework, you should
    also use them to develop your essays. To do
    that, you put the parts together, filling in and
    smoothing out as necessary. To give you a quick
    picture of that, heres how a body paragraph
    using the evidence and discussion/interpretation
    Ive shown you above might look in a final draft

24
  • At the first of the story, the narrator describes
    himself and his friends as dangerous
    characters, and he talks about their drinking
    cheap alcohol, sniffing glue, taking drugs, and
    driving their parents cars recklessly (121-0).
    Similarly, he describes the lake with a dim view,
    saying it was
  • fetid and murky, the mud banks glittering with
    broken glass and strewn with beer cans and the
    charred remains of bonfires. There was a single
    ravaged island a hundred yards from shore, so
    stripped of vegetation it looked as if the air
    force had strafed it. (120-1)
  • From the start, its clear that both these
    teenagers and this lake dont have an outward
    appearance that is the clean freshness often
    associated with both youth and nature. While we
    are used to authors describing characters or
    using characters descriptions to give us clues as
    to who the characters really are, the use of
    setting to reflect that gives us a deeper
    understanding of the place from which these young
    men begin in this story.

25
Dos and Donts
  • Do quote the text and correctly cite it!
  • Do use the correct convention for a writers
    name!
  • Dont summarize the whole work!
  • Dont use a quote or specific example unless it
    directly relates to your thesis or point.

26
  • Questions?
About PowerShow.com