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Title: SATERN Half Day Class Room Training June 4, 2005


1
SATERN Half Day Class Room TrainingJune 4, 2005
www.satern.net
2
Contents
SECTION I -- Introduction to SATERN SECTION II --
Emergency Disaster Services SECTION III --
Emergency Management Cycle SECTION IV -- ICS
Incident Management System SECTION V -- SATERN
Message Handling SECTION VI -- Radio Etiquette
3
Section IIntroduction to SATERN
4
  • Introduction to
  • S.A.T.E.R.N.
  • Salvation Army Team Emergency
  • Radio Network
  • Riverside and San Bernardino Counties Section
  • Sierra Del Mar Division
  • www.satern.net

5
  • What is SATERN? 
  • SATERN is the official Emergency
    Communication Service of The Salvation Army
  • SATERN is a group of amateur radio operators
    who have volunteered their skills to assist The
    Salvation Army with radio communications during a
    disaster response
  • www.satern.net

6
  • Where is SATERN located?
  •  
  • In all 50 states, Canada, England,
  • and
  • In many other parts of the world

www.satern.net
7
  • SATERN has proven its effectiveness
  • Plainfield IL Tornado Lamont Tornado
  • Hurricane Andrew Hurricane Marilyn
  • Alaska Forest Fires Northridge Earthquake
  • Fort Smith Tornado Rose Lawn Air Crash
  • Kobe Earthquake Mississippi River Floods
  • Landers Earthquake Pittsburgh US Air Crash
  • North Dakota Floods Oklahoma City Bombing
  • Florida Wildfires Oklahoma City Tornado
  • Colorado Wildfires 9-11-01 Terrorist Attack
  • Arizona Wildfires just to name a few

www.satern.net
8
Paul Cook, N6RPF

Riverside/San Bernardino Counties
SATERN Coordinator
SATERN Coordinating
Committee
9
SATERN R/SB Counties Section Serves San
Bernardino Corps Cathedral City Corps
Hemet Corps Corona Corps Ontario
Corps Perris ARC Redlands Corps
Murrieta Corps Riverside Corps Victor
Valley Corps Moreno Valley Corps Morongo
Valley Outpost San Bernardino ARC  
Adult
Rehabilitation Centers
www.satern.net
10
SA/SATERN LOCATIONS
11
The Riverside and San Bernardino Counties
Committee Tony KE6JZF at (909)-628-2843,
email ke6jzf_at_verizon.net Don WA6UVW at (909)
797-7763, email remark3_at_verizon.net
Dave WB6OUJ at (909) 794-2352, email
wb6ouj_at_verizon.net Harm
AC6VN at (951) 693-2383, email ac6vn_at_arrl.net
Brian KG6WRX at (909) 732-9724,
e-mail brian_at_coxcomputer.com Major Russell
Fritz, San Bernardino Corps Officer, Advisor
www.satern.net
12
The Primary Objective of SATERN Enroll Amateur
Radio operators and provide periodic training and
drills to develop skills in emergency radio
communication and message handling to assist in
Salvation Army disaster operations
13
SATERN R/SB Counties Section Goals   Enable
communications among Corps locations, local
operations, and Division HQ   Recruit and train
amateur radio operators for each Corps location
to act as local Corps Communication Coordinators
www.satern.net
14
Actions to achieve the communication
goal   Equip each Corps with permanent VHF
antenna(s) to establish basic communication
capability - simplex, 5 watts or less   A SATERN
member hooks up his own VHF HT to the installed
antenna with a pre-positioned jumper cable and
he/she is ready to communicate.
www.satern.net
15
Installations done to date   San
Bernardino Corps Corona Corps Riverside
Corps Hemet Corps Moreno Valley Corps Perris
ARC Redlands Corps Ontario Corps Victor
Valley Corps Murrieta Corps Cathedral City Corps
San Bernardino ARC Morongo Field
Office SATERN Rancho Relay
Adult Rehabilitation Centers  
Tests have been very successful
16
  • What kind of training is available?
  •  
  • Local seminars specific to R/SB section
  • Formal emergency management courses,
  • some with text and certification
  • Salvation Army training at various levels
  • Regular nets and periodic drills
  • Other planned activities

17
SATERN nets   SATERN R/S.B. Counties Section VHF
net 146.985 MHz - PL 146.2 Sundays 800 PM
  SATERN San Diego VHF net 145.32 MHz - PL
107.2 Thursday 830 PM   SATERN Western Regional
HF net 75 Meters 3.9777 MHz Sundays 8 PM
PST ( 9 PM PDT)   SATERN National HF net 20
Meters 14.265 MHz 700 AM Monday
thru Saturday
18
Section IIEmergency Disaster Services
19
(No Transcript)
20
Emergency
  • Emergency A situation with or without warning,
    causing or threatening death, injury, or
    disruption to normal life for numbers of people.

21
Emergency
  • Emergency Functions Includes warning and
    communications services, relocation of persons,
    temporary restoration of utilities, welfare,
    health, search, rescue, fire fighting, and other
    necessary activities.

22
Emergency
  • Anticipated Emergency Those conditions which
    because of their nature may require mobilization
    of emergency forces if conditions increase in
    severity.

23
Emergency
  • Limited Emergency An event that requires
    response of emergency forces over and above
    normal working functions, but which is manageable
    within the local capability of the Corps or
    Service Extension Unit.

24
Emergency
  • Local Emergency The existence of conditions of
    disaster or of extreme peril to the safety of
    persons or property within the limits of the
    Corps or service extension area, and which
    conditions are likely to be out of the control of
    the services, personnel, equipment of the local
    facilities and thus requires the combined efforts
    of the divisional resources.

25
Emergency
  • Divisional Emergency/Response Any natural or
    technological catastrophe that causes damage of
    sufficient severity and magnitude to warrant
    major disaster assistance to supplement the
    efforts of the local corps in alleviating damage,
    loss, and hardship.

26
Emergency
  • Territorial Emergency/Response Any natural or
    technological catastrophe that causes damage of
    sufficient severity and magnitude to warrant
    major disaster assistance to supplement the
    efforts of the local division in alleviating
    damage, loss, and hardship.

27
Emergency
  • NHQ Emergency/Response Any natural or
    technological catastrophe that causes damage of
    sufficient severity and magnitude to warrant
    major disaster assistance from NHQ resources to
    supplement the efforts of the Territorial
    response.

28
Section IIIEmergency ManagementCycle
29
Emergency Management Cycle
Preparedness
u
EVENT
Emergency
Management
Response
Mitigation
u
u
Cycle
Recovery
u
30
Preparedness
  • Preparedness consists of those things that
    could be or should be done prior to the actual
    event, such as Planning, equipping, training, and
    exercising.
  • Go bag reviewed and ready to go
  • Batteries fully charged
  • Radio checked out and ready to go

31
Preparedness
  • Awareness and self-sufficiency programs
  • Family emergency plans
  • Training
  • Salvation Army EDS Training Courses
  • SATERN
  • ARRL (ARES)
  • ECS (RACES)
  • CERT, ETC

32
Response
  • The efforts to minimize the risks created in an
    emergency by protecting the people, the
    environment, and property, and the efforts to
    return the scene to normal pre-emergency
    conditions. Response activities include
    direction and control, warning, evacuation, and
    other similar operations.

33
Recovery
  • The phase that involves restoring the systems to
    normal. Short-term recovery actions are taken to
    assess damage and return vital systems to minimum
    operating standards long term recovery actions
    may continue for many years.

34
Mitigation
  • Those activities designed to either prevent the
    occurrence of an emergency or to minimize the
    potentially adverse effects of an emergency or
    long-term activities.

35
Mitigation Activities - Home
  • Emergency power
  • Securing the structure against high winds
  • Shutters on windows
  • Trimming trees near buildings
  • Proper drainage

36
Section IVSalvation ArmyICSIncident
Management/Command System
37
Incident Management/Command System
  • The principal system used by emergency response
    agencies for organizing and managing emergency
    disaster response is the Incident Management
    (IMS) or Incident Command System (ICS).

38
IMS/ICS Objectives
  • Ensures central control of the response.
  • Ensures the conservation and appropriate
    utilization of resources.
  • Limits the amount of detail one individual must
    handle and enhances the span of control.

39
IMS/ICS Objectives
  • Provides a common organizational structure that
    allows easy interface with emergency response
    agencies.
  • Offers key management principles in a
    standardized format.

40
Incident Command System
41
ICS
  • Policy Group (Not in EOC)
  • Staff at Salvation Army divisional headquarters
    directly supervises the Incident Commander.
    Divisional headquarters staff makes policy
    decisions, including the overall direction,
    duration, staffing and financing of the disaster
    relief operation, not the Incident Commander.
  • Incident Commander
  • The IC is the onsite manager of the disaster
    relief operation and is responsible for
    coordinating all emergency services and support
    operations.

42
ICS
  • Public Information Officer
  • The PIO is the central point for dissemination
    of information to the news media and other
    agencies and organizations.
  • Liaison Officer
  • The Liaison Officer is the Salvation Armys
    representative and point-of-contact for other
    disaster relief groups.
  • Safety Officer
  • The Safety Officer is responsible for addressing
    issues related to safety and security of the
    disaster relief operation.
  • Pastoral Care Officer
  • Pastoral Care Officer is responsible for
    managing spiritual and emotional support services
    on the disaster operation.

43
ICS
  • Operations Section Chief
  • The Operations Section Chief is responsible for
    managing all direct services during a disaster
    relief operation
  • Logistics Section Chief
  • The Logistics Section Chief is responsible for
    obtaining and managing all resources and
    equipment necessary to run the disaster relief
    operation. SATERN operations fall under Logistics
  • Finance/Administration Section Chief
  • The Finance/Administration Section Chief is
    responsible for managing many of the paper-work
    details necessary to support a disaster relief
    operation, i.e. statistics, personnel and
    volunteer recruitment and accounting.

44
ICS
  • Planning Section Chief
  • The Planning Section Chief is responsible for
    assessing community needs in the wake of a
    disaster and recommending appropriate short and
    long-term Salvation Army assistance programs to
    meet those needs.

45
Command Post
  • Command Post A location from which the Incident
    Commander can gather information, make decisions,
    and coordinate the response efforts.

46
EOC
  • Emergency Operations Center (EOC) A central
    facility from which key officials can gather
    information, make decisions, and direct and
    coordinate response and recovery efforts.

47
Section VSATERN MessageHandling
48
S.A.T.E.R.N.
Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio
Network Riverside and San Bernardino Counties
Section Of the Sierra Del Mar Division
MESSAGE HANDLING
49
Message Handling The three main things to
stress in traffic handling are accuracy,
accuracy, and accuracy. A message can be worse
than useless if it is not accurate.
Therefore, the primary object in traffic
handling is one hundred percent accuracy
ninety-nine percent wont do.
50
Break and Go Method
SATERN Riverside and San Bernardino Counties
Section uses the "Break Go" Message Handling
Procedure Sender speaks no more than 3 to 5
words, then waits for the receiver to give a "Go"
before sending the next 3 to 5 words. This lets
the one receiving the message set the pace at a
speed he can write down with 100 accuracy.
51
To Achieve Accuracy When Passing Traffic
  • Avoid the dreaded Slow Key I.e. press the PTT
    at least a second before starting to talk
  • Speak slowly and distinctly and enunciate
    clearly remember the operator receiving the
    traffic is writing it down.
  • Use clear text no codes.
  • Avoid large words, or words with ambiguous
    meaning.

52
To achieve accuracy when passing traffic
  • No need to repeat the message back if you are
    certain you received it correctly.
  • Use the 24-hour clock
  • Spell questionable or sound-alike words, and use
    phonetics on sound-alike letters. But use
    phonetics sparingly they can actually be harder
    to copy under some conditions than the letter
    name alone.

53
Section VIRadio Etiquette
54
Radio Etiquette
Radio is a command and control tool. It is used
to pass information across great distances and
make coordination of resources possible in a way
that smoke signals, mirrors, runners, and other
ancient means of communications just can't begin
to match. Like any other tool, it can be misused.
Here are a few "rules" that will help you from
falling into the misused trap.  
55
Use Plain English - No "Q-codesand No 10-codes
Use location identifiers or function Title, i.e..
"Net Control", "Command Post", "Ontario Corps
Officer", "San Bernardino County EOC", "Riverside
County Primary EOC" etc.
56
Know What You Want to Say Before You Key the Mike
Nothing makes people crazier than the guy who
gets on the air and then spends a couple of
minutes killing air time with er's, oh's,
and-ah's, and other garbage that makes it plain
he's making it up as he goes along in hopes that
what he really needs to say will come to him.
57
Keep It Short and Simple
Never, ever, never pack 5 seconds worth of
information into 25 seconds. Don't use long/big
words when a short and sweet one will do just as
well (and probably better). Bad Ah net control
this is , canteen one, Ah yeah ah roger that ah
net control - got a ah solid copy on your last ah
transmission about that ah geographical location
that we're ah supposed to be moving towards to
ah, rendezvous ah, that is, ah, meet up with the
ah, other canteen Over Good Net control this
is canteen oneCopy Out
58
Pause for Breaks Every Now and Then
While you're droning your way through the
Gettysburg Address someone may have something
critical come up that really IS important and
that needs to be said NOW, only he can't because
some moron (you know the guy - you've all hear
him!!) is hogging the air because he loves the
sound of his own voice!
59
Remember the Whole World Is Listening
Scanners abound. Make sure you realize that what
you say will be public knowledge.
60
Talk Across the Mike, Not Into It.
Hold it a couple inches away from your face to
avoid over modulating, and speak in a normal
voice, at right angles "across" the mike instead
of right into it. You'll be easier to understand.
61
Don't Shout. Speak Clearly Instead.
Shouting may feel emotionally satisfying, but it
causes distortion and makes you harder to
understand. Contrary to the opinion of some,
shouting does not, repeat NOT, increase the range
of any radio known to mankind.
62
For the Command Post Guys, DON'T , PLEASE DON'T,
Read Everything Back!
You're doubling the necessary air time. Only ask
for a "Say again" on the stuff you didn't get.
Otherwise, just say "Copy, over" and stand by for
the next part
63
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