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DHS Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Brief

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Title: DHS Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Brief


1
DHS Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Brief
LCDR Troy Beshears USCG UAV Platform
Manager Troy.beshears_at_navy.mil
2
UAV Altitude/Classification
U-2
HAE
70K
Global Hawk
60K
Heron 2 Predator B
50K
Altitude
40K
30K
Medium
Heron 1 Predator A
20K
Eagle Eye, Fire scout, Hunter, Pioneer
10K
10
20
Tactical
30
Endurance (hours)
3
Unmanned Aerial Vehicles
Global Hawk Length 44.4 ft Wingspan 116
ft Height 14 ft Payload Wt 1,000
lbs Endurance 36 hours Max
Altitude 65,000 Max Airspeed 320
kts Sensors EO/IR, SAR, ISAR, SIGNET, MTS
Predator B Length 36 ft Wingspan 66
ft Height 9.5 ft Payload Wt 800
lbs Endurance 36 hours Max
Altitude 50,000 Max Airspeed 220
kts Sensors EO/IR, SAR, ISAR, SIGNET, MTS
Heron A Length 26 ft Wingspan 54
ft Height 5.9 ft Payload Wt 550
lbs Endurance 36 hours Max
Altitude 25,000 Max Airspeed 120
kts Sensors EO/IR, SAR, ISAR, SIGNET, MTS
4
Unmanned Aerial Vehicles
Hunter Length 22 ft Wingspan 29
ft Height 5.6 ft Payload Wt 250
lbs Endurance 10 hours Max
Altitude 15,000 Max Airspeed 100
kts Sensors EO/IR, SAR, ISAR, MTS
Eagle Eye Length 17 ft Proprotor 17
ft Height 5.5 ft Payload Wt 200
lbs Endurance 5 hours Max
Altitude 20,000 Max Airspeed 220
kts Sensors EO/IR, SAR, ISAR, SIGNET, MTS
FireScout Length 23 ft Wingspan 20
ft Height 9.5 ft Payload Wt 200
lbs Endurance 4 hours Max
Altitude 20,000 Max Airspeed 120
kts Sensors EO/IR, SAR, ISAR, SIGNET, MTS
5
Unmanned Aerial Vehicles
Sentry Length 8.4 ft Wingspan 12.8
ft Height 4 ft Payload Wt 75
lbs Endurance 3 hours Max
Altitude 15,000 Max Airspeed 100
kts Sensors EO/IR
Dragon Warrior Length 10 ft Rotor Dia 9
ft Height 5 ft Payload Wt 35
lbs Endurance 3 hours Max
Altitude 4,000 Max Airspeed 70
kts Sensors EO/IR
Dragon Eye Length 3 ft Wingspan 3.8
ft Height 1 ft Payload Wt 5
lbs Endurance 1hours Max Altitude 1,200
ft Max Airspeed 35 kts Sensors EO/IR
6
Global Hawk Size Comparison
7
UAV MISHAP RATE
1996 To 2002
UAV Hours Flown Class A
Mishaps Freq _at_ 100k hrs Global Hawk
2,100 3 141 Predator
31,000 9 29 Hunter
15,000 2 13 Pioneer
9,000 4 44 Fire Scout
30 1 3,333 Bell 911
100 0 4.2 HH-65 675,000

1.8 C-130 0.8
8
Air-to-Air RadarAirspace Deconfliction
FAA Order 7610.4
  • Provide an equivalent level of safety,
    comparable to see-and-avoid requirements for
    manned aircraft.
  • Alternatives explicitly cited in the directive
    that would suffice
  • Radar observation
  • Forward or side looking cameras
  • Electronic detection systems
  • Visual observation
  • Monitored by patrol or chase aircraft
  • Or a combination thereof

Operations not conducted under ICAO are under the
due regard or operational prerogative of
state aircraft. Nationally implemented by DoD
Directive 4540.1, requires one or more of the
following conditions
  • VMC (implies pilot on board)
  • Under radar surveillance and communications
    with a surface facility
  • Aircraft equipped with an airborne radar
    sufficient to provide safe separation from air
    traffic

8
9
Why choose an airborne surveillance sensor?
  • Large area coverage
  • Remote area coverage
  • High-resolution imagery
  • Long dwell times over areas of interest
  • Readily available technology
  • Flexibility in tasking
  • Ability to operate in hostile environments

10
Imaging Sensors
  • Electro-optical/Infrared Imagers (EO/IR)
  • Multispectral Imagers
  • Combine Low Light Images with FLIR



11
Imaging Sensors
  • Synthetic Aperture Radars (SAR)

Visual Image
SAR Image
12
Imaging Sensors
  • Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radars (ISAR)

13
Imaging Sensors
  • Hyperspectral Imagers

Hyperspectral Data Cube
14
DATA LINK OPTIONS
15
Available Dissemination Capabilities
TCDL Antenna Telemetry provides for Command
Control of UAV, System Health Monitoring,
Single Payload Transmission _at_ 30fps. UHF
Antenna Provides Command Control of UAV,
System Health Monitoring _at_ 10fps. IRIDIUM Comme
rcial Communication Satellite System Command
Control of UAV, limited Payload. KU Band Over
the Horizon Satellite Capability, cost
effectiveness vs. availability.
16
Shortcomings of Line of Sight (LOS) Antennas
  • Telemetry bandwidth incapable of providing
    transmission of EO/IR and ISAR payloads
    simultaneously.
  • Can only control one UAV at a time, without
    switching between platforms.
  • Over the Horizon (OTH) operations require that
    the air vehicle be operated at or above 10,000
    agl beyond 110nm. At this altitude most
    EO/IR sensors are ineffective at identifying
    targets of interest.

17
Levels Of AV Command and Control
  • LEVEL V
  • Launch
  • Recovery
  • Flight
  • Control
  • Payload
  • Control
  • Direct Data
  • Receipt
  • LEVEL IV
  • Flight
  • Control
  • Payload
  • Control
  • Direct Data
  • Receipt
  • LEVEL III
  • Payload
  • Control
  • Direct Data
  • Receipt
  • LEVEL I
  • Secondary
  • Product
  • LEVEL II
  • Direct Data Receipt

18
Interoperability is Key to Domain Awareness
  • HALE/MALE UAVs Satellites to Surveil,
    Detect Classify
  • VUAVs Provide Surveillance, Detection,
    Classification Identification
  • Manned Platforms will focus on the
    Prosecution of TOIs spend less time searching.

19
Evaluation of possible deployment sites based on
UAV Ranges
APB05209-18-02
20
Persistent Presence provided by UAVs
Key to Enhancing Common Operational Picture
APB05509-18-02
21
QUESTIONS
LCDR Troy Beshears G-OCA-2/PMA 263 UAV Platform
Manager United States Coast Guard
22
USCG Alaska Post Mission Brief
  • USCG Mission Objectives
  • Determine a suitable location to conduct Unmanned
    Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) operations within the
    Alaskan Region.
  • Determine the required logistics to set up the
    UAVs at the selected location with respect to
    personnel and equipment.
  • Successfully conduct Functionally Check Flights
    with the UAVs within the cold weather
    environment.
  • Successfully Return the UAV system to its origin.

23
USCG Alaska Post Mission Brief
  • USCG Alaska Mission Stakeholders
  • Organizations Relationship
  • USCG Sponsor
  • NAVAIR, PMA-263 Asset Custodians
  • USAF Site Facility Owners
  • Contractors
  • CIRPAS Support Equipment
  • General Atomics-ASI Asset Operators

24
USCG Alaska Post Mission Brief
Successfully Selected a suitable location to
conduct USCG Predator operations USCG
Predator UAV Operational Site King Salmon, ALASKA
25
USCG Alaska Post Mission Brief
USCG Predator UAV Operation Area
Pt 1 58 26 N Pt 2 57 40 N Pt 3  57 23
N Pt 4  57 57 N      157 53 W 158 05
W 158 37 W 159 36W
26
USCG Alaska Post Mission Brief
Successfully conducted Voice Radio Relay
Communication to USCG Cutter from the Predator
Ground Control Station.
27
USCG Alaska Post Mission Brief
  • USCG Predator UAV Mission Accomplishment Summary
  • Successfully Selected a suitable location to
    conduct USN Predator operations.
  • Successfully determined the logistics required to
    get assets in Alaska Region.
  • Successfully conducted FCFs with both US Navy
    Predators.
  • Initial attempt FCF for First Air Vehicle
    successful.
  • Multiple attempts for second Air Vehicle
    required.
  • Successfully identified USCG Cutter within the
    UAV operating area.
  • Successfully sent near real time imagery form
    operational site to USCG Headquarters, Washington
    D.C.
  • Successfully conducted Voice Radio Relay
    Communication to USCG Cutter from the Predator
    Ground Control Station.
  • USN Predator System currently In Route to its
    origin.
  • (UAV System Returned 5 Dec 03)

28
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