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Title: Internet2 Partnerships with Advanced Global Networks in the Health Sciences


1
Internet2 Partnerships with Advanced Global
Networks in the Health Sciences
  • Mary Kratz, MT(ASCP)
  • Internet2 Health Sciences Program Manager
  • January 2004

2
Today
  • Who is this person with the funny accent
  • What is Internet2 today?
  • Internet2 activities in the Health Sciences
  • Thoughts on
  • Collaborations for Team Science
  • Cyberinfrastructure
  • National Health Information Infrastructure

2
12/08/03
3
Internet2 (United States)
  • Mission develop and deploy advanced network
    applications and technologies, accelerating the
    creation of tomorrows Internet
  • University
  • Government
  • Industry

3
12/08/03
4
Internet2 today
  • 205 regular university members, 66 Corporate
    members, and 41 Affiliate members
  • Expanded access over 30 state-based education
    networks across the nation
  • 45 International partners, over 27 peer networks
    extending Internet2 backbone network to 50
    countries

4
12/08/03
5
Science and Technology
  • Research increasingly dependent on access
    globally to resources, collaborators, data,
    scientific instruments.
  • Access to scientific instruments with specific
    geo-location needs
  • Optical telescopes e.g., Gemini South, Chile
    operated by US and other countries
  • Radio telescopes - VLBI establishing distributed
    antennae network (e.g., US, Asia, Europe, South
    America) for very-long baseline interferometry
    (use network to obtain finer-grain pictures of
    the cosmos)
  • Singular instruments not possible for each
    country to afford for their own country
  • 30-story scanning electron microscope in Japan
  • LHC at CERN in Geneva internationally-funded
    facility with collaborators around the world
    (1000s) working to conduct experiments, analyze
    data

5
12/08/03
6
Supporting science and beyond
  • Access/storage of geo-specific data, analysis,
    visualization, sharing
  • Malaria data in sub-Saharan Africa
  • Environmental data from the Amazon or Antarctica
  • Atmospheric/oceanographic studies
  • Arts and Humanities
  • Music master classes push audio/video
    technology harder than some science uses
  • Bring world-class teaching/learning opportunities
    to broader community

6
12/08/03
7
Internet2 Commitment to Core Values
  • Address the advanced networking needs and
    interests of the research education community
  • Provide leadership in the evolution of the global
    Internet
  • Leverage strategic relationships among academia,
    industry and government
  • Catalyze activities that cannot be accomplished
    by individual organizations
  • Implement a systems approach towards a scalable
    and vertically integrated advanced networking
    infrastructure

8
Middleware
http//middleware.internet2.edu
9
Internet2 community middleware infrastructure
  • Common infrastructure for inter-institutional
    authentication/authorization
  • Development of Shibboleth tool
  • Establishment of trust federation InCommon
  • Security
  • Network security, host software, and middleware
    become inter-dependent
  • Security at Line Speed
  • High bandwidth
  • Exceptional low latency, e.g. remote instrument
    control
  • End-to-end transparency, e.g. Grids
  • Exceptional low jitter, e.g. real time
    interactive HDTV
  • Advanced features, e.g. multicast

10
Internet2 community network infrastructure
  • Abilene 10Gbps backbone network
  • Lead from the backbone
  • IP-over-DWDM (OC-192c) and IP-over-SONET OC-48c
    Backbone with 226 participants research
    universities laboratories Expanded access to
    over 32 state education networks
  • Motivate deployment of new capabilities
  • Beyond the bits end to end performance
  • Measurement/monitoring infrastructure across
    backbone, regional, campus networks
    http//abilene.internet2.edu/observatory/
  • New architectures providing flexible, dynamic,
    controllable paths across common infrastructure
    see http//e2e.internet2.edu
  • Campus/State/regional optical networking efforts
  • Beyond the backbone A model of facility-based
    networking built with owned assets (vs. bought
    telecom services) from metro and out (beyond
    gigapops) Regional Optical Networks (RONs)

10
12/08/03
11
Research Optical Networks(RON)
  • Fiberco
  • supporting project designed to support optical
    initiatives (regional and national) holding and
    assignment vehicle (will not light fiber)
  • National LambdaRail (NLR)
  • National leased/owned facility
  • Largest higher-edu owned/managed optical
    networking research facility in the world
    (10,000 route-miles of dark fiber)
  • Four 10-Gbps ?s provisioned at outset
  • One ? allocated to Internet2
  • Experimental platform for research
  • Differentiated set of networks

12
Global ? Integration Facility (GLIF)
  • Dedicated lightpaths
  • Circuit switched sub- ?s
  • HPC resources internationally
  • Leadership
  • StarLight (Chicago)
  • CANet (Canada)
  • SURFnet (Netherlands)
  • Participants
  • Internet2 entering efforts
  • NORDUnet (Scandinavia)
  • Czech Republic
  • Japan

13
Available fiber topology
14
(No Transcript)
15
The current state of the GLIFReykjavik, August
2003
16
Hybrid Optical Packet Infrastructure (HOPI)
  • Converging worlds
  • High-performance national IP network (Abilene)
  • Regional Optical Networks (RON)
  • National optical capabilities (NLR) dedicated to
    Internet2
  • International collaboration efforts and
    leadership (GLIF)
  • HOPI design team (just convened)
  • Architecture
  • Implementation
  • Prelude/process towards a 3rd generation
    Internet2 network architecture

17
More information
  • http//abilene.internet2.edu
  • http//abilene.internet2.edu/observatory
  • http//ipv6.internet2.edu
  • http//www.fiberco.org
  • http//www.nationallambdarail.org
  • A HOPI site to be announced in the near future
  • Stay tuned for Medical Optical Overlay Networks
    (MOON) ?

18
International Focus
  • Build effective partnerships in other countries
  • With organizations of similar goals/objectives
    and similar constituencies
  • Enable global collaboration
  • Ensure global interoperability
  • Mechanism Memoranda of Understanding
  • Provide/promote interconnectivity between
    communities
  • Collaborate on technology development and
    deployment
  • Engagement to
  • Establish leading, high-performance network
    infrastructures in support of science, teaching
    and learning
  • Ensure global coordination and end-to-end
    performance in support of our communities

19
Abilene International Peering
Last updated 2 January 2004
20
Current International Partners
Last updated 01 October 2003
21
Countries reachable via Internet2s Abilene
network
Last updated 04 January 2004
Europe-Middle East
Asia-Pacific
Americas
Austria (ACOnet) Belgium (BELNET) Croatia
(CARNet) Czech Rep. (CESNET) Cyprus
(CYNET) Denmark (Forskningsnettet) Estonia
(EENet) Finland (Funet) France (Renater) Germany
(G-WIN) Greece (GRNET) Hungary
(HUNGARNET) Iceland (RHnet) Ireland
(HEAnet) Israel (IUCC) Italy (GARR) Latvia
(LATNET) Lithuania (LITNET) Luxembourg (RESTENA)
Argentina (RETINA) Brazil (RNP2/ANSP) Canada
(CAnet) Chile (REUNA) Mexico (Red-CUDI) United
States (Abilene, vBNS) Venezuela
(REACCIUN-2)
Malta (Univ. Malta) Netherlands (SURFnet) Norway
(UNINETT) Poland (POL34) Portugal (RCTS2) Qatar
(Qatar FN) Romania (RoEduNet)Russia
(RBnet) Slovakia (SANET) Slovenia (ARNES) Spain
(RedIRIS) Sweden (SUNET) Switzerland
(SWITCH) United Kingdom (JANET) Turkey
(ULAKBYM) CERN
Australia (AARNET) China (CERNET, CSTNET,
NSFCNET) Hong Kong (HARNET) Japan (SINET, WIDE,
IMNET, JGN) Korea (KOREN, KREONET2) Singapore
(SingAREN) Philippines (PREGINET) Taiwan (TANet2,
ASNet) Thailand (UNINET, ThaiSARN)
More information at http//abilene.internet2.edu/
peernetworks/international.html
22
International connectivity
  • Internet2 backbone networks are primarily in the
    United States
  • Primarily, our partners networks pay to get to
    the US
  • NSF provides some funding for 3 international
    links and a couple of interconnection points
  • TransPAC (Asia/Pacific Rim)
  • EuroLink (Europe)
  • NAUKAnet (Russia)
  • STAR TAP/Star Light (Chicago)
  • AMPATH
  • Other international exchange points/transit
    facilitated by Internet2 members

23
Spains National Research and Education Network
  • RedIRIS
  • 2.5 Gbps backbone network
  • Ministry of Science and Technology (1988)
  • Over 250 universities and research centers
  • Connected to GEANT (pan-European network) at 10
    Gbps
  • GEANT to North America

24
Europe
  • Pan-European network GEANT
  • 31 countries connecting
  • Operated by DANTE 10 Gbps core
  • Total of 4x2.5Gbps 2x1Gbps across Atlantic
    (DANTE EuroLink provided)
  • Connecting Europe to other regions of the world
  • ALICE, EUMEDCONNECT

24
25
Asia-Pacific
Russia
Japan

Korea
USA

China
  • Taiwan

Hong Kong

Thailand
Vietnam
Philippines
Malaysia
  • Sri Lanka

Singapore
Indonesia
Exchange Point Access Point Current status 2003
(plan)
Trends - China, Japan, Korea - Singapore,
Australia
  • Australia

25
26
Africa/Middle East/South and Central Asia
  • No dedicated RE network connectivity from
    African continent
  • Some national inter-university connections South
    Africa, Egypt, and Morocco
  • EUMEDconnect
  • Mediterranean countries including North African
    countries
  • Connection to GEANT
  • Middle-East
  • Turkey, Israel Connected to GEANT
  • Persian Gulf Qatar
  • South and Central Asia
  • Virtual Silk project Central Asia
  • India, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Pakistan no
    connectivity

27
Americas
  • Canada, Mexico, US cross-border connectivity
  • Chile, Venezuela, Brazil, Argentina connected to
    Miami via 45Mpbs (AMPATH)
  • Cable infrastructure around the region
  • CLARA backbone network emerging

Latin America and Caribbean(16 countries)
27
28
Challenges
  • Many LA-NRENs still dealing with problems to
    survive traditional telecom model and costs
  • Lack of competition and price-competitive
    capacity (intra-country) and between countries
  • many still largely based on commercial Internet
    services at low speeds
  • Regulatory frameworks
  • limited global connectivity
  • Difficulty adopting to innovative network models
  • Beyond networks, applications, content and the
    human factor
  • country developments are varied disparities in
    capabilities and resources even further
    challenges (collaboration intra and out)
  • Lack of awareness among policy makers and user
    communities for long-term strategic support to
    sustain networking for national ST and economic
    development
  • Lack of funding for RE and for advanced nets

29
Committed to Core Values
  • Address the advanced networking needs and
    interests of the research education community
  • Provide leadership to evolve the global Internet
  • Leverage strategic relationships among academia,
    industry and government
  • Catalyze activities that cannot be accomplished
    by individual organizations
  • Implement a systems approach towards a scalable
    and vertically integrated advanced networking
    infrastructure

30
Some thoughts
  • OEA Workshop Scientific and technological
    development in the Americas
  • Dec. 10-12, 2003 - Within scope of Hemispheric
    Cooperation in the Development of Science and
    Technology Policy Inter-America committee on
    Science and Technology (COMCYT)
  • Workshops on Bio-technology, Nano-technology,
    Materials Science, Clean and Environmental tech,
    and Advanced Nets
  • http//www.redhucyt.oas.org/webing/advnet/quito_en
    .htm
  • Advanced networking and information
    infrastructure as critical vehicles for
    propelling countries of the region into
    competitive knowledge-based economies
  • Strengthen other areas (science, health,
    education), provides access to global scientific
    and technology resources and empowers critical
    social and economic activities
  • Opportunity costs of failure to make this
    investment will result in continued loss of
    competitiveness
  • Policy/Regulatory, Capacity building, and
    supporting strategies

31
CYBERINFRASTRUCTURE
  • multiple accelerating trends are convergingin
    ways that show extraordinary promise for an even
    more profound and rapid transformationNSF
  • Ubiquitous networking interoperability of
    information formats and access will create
    comprehensive knowledge environmentsbased on
    unprecedented capacity for computation, storage,
    and communication.
  • how does the above fit with Latin America, the
    rest of the world?
  • conveying what we are truly meaning by
    cyberinfrastructure. Inwardly and outwardly

32
Components of CyberInfrastructure-enabled
science engineering
High-performance computing
for modeling, simulation, data
processing/mining
People
Instruments for
observation and
characterization.
Individual
Global Connectivity
Physical World
Group Interfaces
Visualization
Facilities for activation,
manipulation and
Collaboration
construction
Services
Knowledge management
institutions for collection building
and curation of data, information,
literature, digital objects
Source Paul Messina Fall 2003 Internet2 member
meeting, Cyberinfrastrucutre Promises and
Challenges presentation at http//www.internet2.
edu/presentations/fall-03/20031014-Plenary-Messina
.htm
33
The commercial (if time allows)
  • workshop on Supporting Advanced Networking in
    hard to reach places (of the world) within Spring
    I2 member meeting (tentatively April 22, 2004,
    Arlington, VA)
  • Background previous discussions around
  • what do we really mean by Hard to reach place?
  • tools and tech/operational sharing what are the
    tools, things that may or may not work
  • exploring tech alternatives (beyond ubiquitous
    high performance networks to overlay networks,
    WIFI, storage,  others)
  • developing countries what are the issues that
    we can talk about for under-resourced places
    bandwidth, cost access, expertise, diagnostics,
    training, funding, management, sustainability
  • exchanging and sharing of stories discussions
    around having clearinghouse of information
  • discussions on looking at providing advisory
    role(s) via papers, policy, etc

34
1st workshop
  • to  bring together members of the international
    and Internet2 community, aid and science agencies
    and learn about one another. 
  • Why? Internet2 community and peer organizations
    around the world highlighting the work and role
    of the advanced networking community and
    educating/getting acquainted with funding
    agencies to help illustrate why advanced
    networks-- but even just network infrastructure
    to support a country/region's higher ed and
    research -- can have an impact on science,
    technology, economic, social? And to also learn
    about existing or planned programs within the
    different agencies and discuss opportunities for
    collaboration
  • Framework around examples from research and
    education advanced networking community doing
    and making a difference (before/after, metrics,
    importance)
  • Thoughts? Contact me at Ana Preston
    ltapreston_at_internet2.edugt

35
Conclusions
  • Leading-edge, high-performance network
    environments are being put in place to support
    science, research, teaching and learning in
    countries around the world
  • ..but we need to continue to advance the
    leading-edge of network technologies
  • National policy-makers increasingly understand
    the critical importance of infrastructure to
    support research, education, science,
    engineering, art and medicine
  • As a global community, we need to work even more
    closely together to ensure support for global
    science on an end to end basis
  • THANK YOU!

35
36
(No Transcript)
37
Healthcare in the Information Age
38
The scope of the Internet2 Health Science
Workgroup includes clinical practice, medical and
related biological research, education, and
medical awareness in the public.
39
In the modern era every century has had its
major advance that has brought medical science
another giant step forward... What will the
major advance of the 21st century be?I am
convinced that the medical revolution of our
childrens lifetime will be the application of
Information technology to health care.
  • US Secretary of Health and Human Services
  • Tommy Thompson, 21 March 2003

40
NIH Roadmap
Science is evolving at an incredible pace. Its
a revolutionary period. The fundamental change
is that biomedical science has converged. You
have to almost consciously say, O.K. how do we
take this into account.E. Zerhouni,
M.D.Director, National Institutes of HealthThe
New York Times (July 15th, 2003)
41
Key Internet2 Health Science Members (just a
sampling)
  • 86 Academic Medical Centers (AAMC)
  • Stanford, Harvard, Ohio State, UIC, Northwestern,
    UPenn, etc.
  • 130 Health Science related colleges
  • Public Health, Nursing, Dentistry, Pharmacy,
    Social Work
  • Affiliates
  • NIH, FDA, NSF, NASA, NOAA
  • Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Altarum, ORNL,
    NLANR, etc.
  • Big Pharma
  • JohnsonJohnson, Pfizer, Eli Lilly
  • TeleHealth
  • Prous Science
  • Cisco, IBM, Microsoft, SUN, Polycom, etc.
  • Ford Motor Company

42
Internet2 Health Science Applications
  • Pathology
  • Virtual Tumor Board
  • Remote Digital Microscopy
  • Ophthalmology
  • Retinal studies
  • Dentistry
  • Cranio-facial reconstruction
  • Nursing
  • Clinical Care planning
  • Skills Assessment/Training
  • Preventative Medicine
  • Disease Surveillance
  • Infection Disease (SARS/HIV)
  • Nanotechnology
  • Miniaturization
  • Physiology monitoring
  • Pharmacy
  • Drug Interactions
  • Benefits Analysis
  • Simulation and Imaging
  • Radiology
  • Laparoscopy
  • Telehealth
  • Emergency/Trauma
  • Video steaming
  • Minimally Invasive Surgery
  • Computer Assisted Surgery
  • Cardiovascular
  • Computer Aided Diagnosis
  • Biomedical Informatics Research Network
  • Cancer grid
  • International Health Education
  • Second Opinion Networks
  • Public Health
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and
    Bioengineering (NIBIB/NIH)

43
Why Physicians Participate in Internet2
  • Extends the opportunities
  • TeleHealth
  • National Tumor Board
  • Clinical Skills and Assessment (AAMC
    partnerships)
  • Focus on distributed data sharing
  • Electronic Health Record
  • Presence and Integrated Communications (VoIP,
    RFID)
  • Advanced visualization Computer Aided Diagnosis
  • Computer Assisted Surgery (Minimally invasive
    surgery)
  • Collaboration
  • Second Opinion Networks
  • Learning Technology (Distance Education)
  • Knowledge Management

44
Why Researchers Participate in this community
  • Internet2 doesn't only save time, it allows
    interactivity in places where that was not
    possible before. I'd call it a quantum leap, if I
    didn't know that physics defines that as the
    smallest change a system is capable of...
    Timothy Poston, Bangladesh

45
Why Educators Participate in Internet2
  • Rich resources from student endpoints to
    centralized powerful computation and large
    storage
  • Students absorb multiple channels of information
  • Slide courtesy of Parvati Dev, Stanford University

Dynamic charts
Second screen
lecture
Communal note taking
messaging
46
Grand Challenge CyberInfrastructure
  Organism(person) Organ Tissue Cell
Protein Atom organ systems
(1m) (10-3m) (10-6m)
(10-9m) (10-12m) (10-15m)
       Systems models
Continuum models (PDEs) ODEs Stochastic
models Pathway models Gene networks  
 
 
Modeling, Simulation, Visualization, Software
Frameworks, Databases, Networking, Grids
Courtesy Peter Hunter, University of Auckland
47
Reference Model for Open Distributed Processing
ISO/IEC Standard 10746-1
  • Enterprise Viewpoint is concerned with the
    purpose, scope and policies governing the
    activities of the specified system within the
    organization of which it is a part
  • Information Viewpoint is concerned with the kinds
    of information handled by the system and
    constraints on the use and interpretation of that
    information
  • Computational Viewpoint is concerned with the
    functional decomposition of the system into a set
    of objects that interact at interfaces - enabling
    system distribution
  • Engineering Viewpoint is concerned with the
    infrastructure required to support system
    distribution
  • Technology Viewpoint is concerned with the choice
    of technology to support system distribution.

48
Middleware
  http//www.nas.nasa.gov/Pubs/NASnews/97/09/ipg_f
ig1.html
49
Time Needed to Move Brain Images Across the
Internet
Voxel size 1 mmImaging Technology Current
color MRIData generated 4.5 Megabytes
643 seconds
56 Kbps Modem
36 seconds
Broadband Internet
0.4 seconds
Typical LAN
0.006 seconds
Current Internet2 Record (5.6 Gbps)
50
Time Needed to Move Brain Images Across the
Internet
Voxel size 10 µmImaging Technology Current
color fMRI Data generated 4.5 Terabytes
178,571 hours
56 Kbps Modem
10,000 hours
Broadband Internet
100 hours
Typical LAN
1.8 hours
Current Internet2 Record (5.6 Gbps)
51
Time Needed to Move Brain Images Across the
Internet
Voxel size 1 µmImaging Technology Near-future
color fMRIData generated 4.5 Petabytes
1,062,925.17 weeks
56 Kbps Modem
59,523.8 weeks
Broadband Internet
181.7 weeks
Typical LAN
10.6 weeks
Current Internet2 Record (5.6 Gbps)
52
EACH BRAIN REPRESENTS A LOT OF DATA
AND COMPARISONS MUST BE MADE BETWEEN MANY (fMRI)
Slide courtesy of Arthur Toga (UCLA)
53

54
Digital Interactive Virtual Environments
  • Students in CS, IT, engineering, math and
    medicine support emerging technology, research
    and discovery
  • Interdisciplinary learning, training and problem
    solving creating learning families and project
    teams
  • Leverage scarce specialized resources

55
Anatomy and Surgery Workbench and Local NGI
Testbed Network
  • Students learn anatomy and practice surgery
    techniques using 3-D workstations
  • Network testbed evaluates the effectiveness of
    workbench applications

Stanford University School of Medicine
56
Human Embryo Development
  • 3-D visualizations of human embryo development
  • Doctors can manipulate data remotely
  • Animations of embryo system development for
    students

George Mason University, Oregon Health Science
University, National Library of Medicine
http//www.nac.gmu.edu/visembryo.htm http//www.oh
su.edu/chrc/
57
National Digital Mammography Archive
http//nscp01.physics.upenn.edu/ndma/index.html
58
Molecular Interactive Collaborative Environment
(MICE)
  • Interactive 3D
  • Multiple physical locations interact via the
    network
  • Collaboratively examine and manipulate a shared
    3D macromolecule
  • Real-time

59
Virtual Laboratories
  • Real-time access to remote instruments
  • University of North Carolina, Chapel
    HillDistributed nanoManipulator

60
Partnerships Serve as a Catalyst
  • Direct Visualizations
  • Data Collection/Integration
  • Data Mining (BioGRID)
  • Device intercommunication
  • Haptic Immersion
  • Advanced sensors (MEMS)
  • Augmented dexterity
  • Wireless Data Collection
  • Economic models for reimbursement realities

61
Security and Privacy Guidelines
62
Molecular Interactive Collaborative Environment
(MICE)http//mice.sdsc.edu/
  • Interactive 3D environment
  • Multiple users at different physical locations
    interact via the network
  • Collaboratively examine and manipulate a shared
    3D macromolecule
  • Real-time

63
Remote Instrumentation
  • Phillips XL30 Scanning Electron Microscope
  • Remote operation and Resource sharing
  • Now accessible to a larger audience
  • New teaching and learning techniques are possible

64
National Security
65
Virtual Aneurysm
  • A simulation and virtual reality visualization
    of brain blood flow
  • Researchers examine critical flow pattern and
    evaluate simulated surgical interventions

University of California at Los Angeles
http//www.cs.ucla.edu/dalee/radsci/
66
Virtual Pelvic Floor
  • Provides 3-D visualization of complex
    anatomical structures
  • Participants use ImmersaDesk systems to
    interact with 3-D anatomical model

University of Illinois at Chicago
http//www.sbhis.uic.edu/vrml/Research/PelvicFloor
/PelvicFloor.htm
67
Anatomy and Surgery Workbench and Local NGI
Testbed Network
  • Allows students to learn anatomy and practice
    surgery techniques using 3-D workstations
  • Network testbed evaluates the effectiveness of
    workbench applications

Stanford University School of Medicine
http//haiti.stanford.edu/ngi/final/
68
Renal Physiology Modules
  • Overcomes the limits of one-dimensional mediums
    to represent dynamic systems of the body.
  • The modules allow students to integrate and
    apply their knowledge to real-life problems

Stanford University Virtual Labs Project
http//summit.stanford.edu/hhmi
69
Veterinary Medicine Research Network
  • 22 Veterinary colleges in the United States
  • All 22 Internet2 Members
  • Virtual Grand Rounds
  • Distance Education
  • Animal Clinical Trials
  • Robotic Surgery
  • Medical Devices
  • Completed infrastructure survey of Veterinary
    Schools
  • Agricultural interest (USDA)

70
Distributed Medical Informatics Education
  • Covers a broad range of fields including
    electronic medical records and information
    retrieval
  • Distance learning provides students with access
    to faculty, expertise, and other students

Oregon Health Science University and the
University of Pittsburgh
http//www.ohsu.edu/bicc-informatics/ http//www.c
bmi.upmc.edu/
71
NLM Testbed for Collaborative Videoconferencing
  • Provides an environment for videoconferencing in
    distance learning programs
  • Transmits a variety of medical information,
    including data from instruments

National Library of Medicine
http//tlc.nlm.nih.gov/distancelearningandcollabor
ation.html
72
Virtual Tumor Board
73
Surveyor
  • Web-based research environment integrates rural
    health data with GIS technology
  • Support for rural health care practitioners in
    underserved areas

University of Wyoming, Wyoming Department of
Health
http//www.wims.uwyo.edu/
74
NLM e2e Pilot StudyBig pipes are not enough!
  • User Experience With The High Performance
    Internet Infrastructure
  • A collaborative study funded by the National
    Library of Medicine with Internet2 End-to-End
    Performance Initiative
  • To better understand the use of networking,
    broadband, and high performance Internet (e.g.,
    Abilene) in the Health Science community

75
(No Transcript)
76
Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG)
  • Extended local infrastructure to join diverse
    data
  • Connect to public data sources
  • Demonstrate value of grid deployment to Cancer
    Centers
  • Extensible infrastructure for cancer research
    community
  • http//cabig.nci.nih.gov/

Funded by NCI/NIH David States, MD, PhD,
Director Bioinformatics Program University of
Michigan Health System
77
ONCOMINE
  • Cancer Microarray Database containing close to 50
    million datapoints
  • Data mining tools to efficiently query genes and
    datasets of interest
  • Meta-analyze groups of studies

http//141.214.6.148080/Array1/ Funded by
Department of Pathology at the University of
Michigan Medical School, The Pew Scholars
Program, The American Cancer Society, and the V
Foundation Arul M. Chinnaiyan, MD, PhD,
Assistant Professor Pathology and Urology Surgery
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Michigan Center for Biological Information (MCBI)
  • Bioinformatics
  • Medical Informatics
  • Microarray Database
  • Proteomics Database Portal
  • Multi-disciplinary
  • University of Michigan, Michigan State
    University, Wayne State University, Van Andel
    Institute

http//www.ctaalliance.org/MCBI/ Funded by
MLSC/MEDC Brian Athey, PhD Director MCBI, UM
Office of the Vice President for Research (OVPR)
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Center for Biologic Nanotechnology
  • Bring together the multiple disciplines necessary
    to develop nanotechnology from conception through
    human trials.
  • Nanotechnology will impact communications,
    information storage, and the materials sciences
    and other non-biologic applications offering
    limitless opportunities for miniaturization
    (e.g., for information storage, communications,
    etc.).

http//nano.med.umich.edu/ Funded by NIH, DOE,
NSF, DARPA James Baker, MD, Director Center for
Biologic Nanotechnology
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PathView
  • Digital Microscopy
  • 3D Image Segmentation
  • Tumor Knowledgebase
  • Pathology, OB/GYN and OB Risk Assessment
  • http//portal.path.med.umich.edu
  • Funded by Risk Assessment, UMHS
  • Richard Lieberman, MD, Clinical Assistant
    Professor, Obstetrics and Gynecology Department
    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pathology
    Department

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Biomedical Informatics Research Network
(BIRN)http//birn.ncrr.nih.gov/and
http//www.nbirn.net/
  • Neuroscience initial focus
  • Stable high performance networks
  • Distributed and linked data collections
  • Grid computing
  • Data mining
  • Integrated visualization tools

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Biomedical Informatics Research Network (BIRN)
http//www.nbirn.net/
83
Roadmap
  • Networking Health Prescriptions for the
    Internet
  • National Research Council Report
  • Current and future Internet
  • Released 24 February 2000
  • National Academy Press
  • ISBN 0-309-06843-6

84
National Health Information INfrastructure
85
BISTI Report
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http//www.cise.nsf.gov/evnt/reports/toc.htm
88
BECON Symposium
89
More Information
  • On the Web
  • health/internet2.edu
  • www.internet2.edu
  • Email
  • info_at_internet2.edu
  • Health_at_internet2.edu
  • Mary Kratz
  • Mkratz_at_internet2.edu
  • 1 (734) 352-7004

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