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MARINE OIL SPILL WORKERS SAFETY

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Title: MARINE OIL SPILL WORKERS SAFETY


1
MARINE OIL SPILL WORKERS SAFETY
2
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3
Introduction
  • It is not one of the mandates of the Canadian
    Coast Guard Auxiliary to assist with oil spills.
  • In addition most vessels are RHIBs, and the tube
    materials do not react well with oil .
  • This presentation is primarily for information
    only.

4
Safety Overview
5
Safety Overview
  • There are numerous kinds of shoreline cleanup
    methods, each involving a variety of worker
    skills and work site hazards.
  • It is important that the response organisation is
    aware of their personnels skills, health, and
    accident notification information.

6
Safety Overview
  • It is the employers responsibility to ensure that
    their workers
  • have safe working conditions
  • know and practice safe operating procedures
  • are supplied with appropriate personal protective
    equipment and clothing, and are trained in its
    use

7
Safety Overview
  • Are aware of emergency communications,
    transportation, facilities and supplies

8
Safety Overview
  • Safety is the result of cooperation, everyone
    working a safe manner and watching out for each
    other.
  • The Supervisor will ensure that site specific
    hazards are identified and that employees are
    instrcuted in the safe use of any additional
    equipment they may reqiuire, such as respirators,
    radios, fire extinguishers, etc.

9
Safety Overview
  • The employee is responsible for
  • Know their job
  • Know who to report to
  • Work safely

10
Safety Overview - Site Orientation
  • Supervisors will conduct site specific hazard
    assessments, so that can orient the employee to
  • Work location
  • Specific Hazards
  • Safety Procedures
  • Emergency Communications

11
Safety Overview - Site Orientation
  • The supervisor should spend a few minutes with
    each cleanup crew each morning reviewing safety
    issues.
  • These daily pre-job meetings are a good
    opportunity for employees to ask questions and
    raise concerns with their supervisor.

12
Safety Overview - General Safety Guidelines
  • Before the employee begins work
  • Report to their supervisor
  • Be aware of their work location
  • Clearly understand assigned activities
  • Ensure they are trained and fit
  • Be sure their buddy is available to provide
    assistance - do not work alone

13
Safety Overview - General Safety Guidelines
  • Know location of First Aid supplies and qualified
    medical attendants
  • Know location of radio/ line communication
    systems
  • Know emergency transportation procedures
  • Be aware of any hazards related to the working
    environment

14
Safety Overview - General Safety Guidelines
  • Safe work practices
  • Use the safety materials, equipment, devices and
    clothing intended for employee protection
  • Follow safe job procedures
  • Report anything that is felt to be hazardous or
    potentially hazardous

15
Safety Overview - General Safety Guidelines
  • Report accidents immediately to their supervisor
  • Do not wander off the work site, in remote areas
    where one might get lost, or in populated areas
    as it may be considered trespassing

16
Safety Overview - Buddy System
  • The Buddy system involves a minimum of two people
    working as a team within the team.
  • Three Simple Rules
  • Keep ones buddy insight at all times
  • Always be able to communicate with their buddy
    verbally or with universal hand signals

17
Safety Overview - Buddy System
  • Watch their buddy for signs of fatigue or
    exposure to cold or heat
  • Alert the buddy to these and other work related
    hazards

18
Safety Overview - Universal Hand Signals
  • Signal Meaning
  • Hand clutching throat Out of air
  • Cant breath
  • Hands on top of head Need assistance
  • Thumbs up Okay
  • I understand
  • Im alright
  • Thumbs Down No
  • Negative
  • Grip partners wrist or place both Leave area
    immediately
  • hands around partners wrist

19
Safety Overview
  • Remember work as a team and work safely

20
Characteristics of Petroleum Products
21
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22
General Hazards of Petroleum Products
  • Petroleum products that could reach our
    shorelines as a result of a marine oil spill
    include
  • Light to volatile oils, such as gasoline
  • Moderate to heavy oils, like diesel, lubricating
    oils and Bunker C.

23
General Hazards of Petroleum Products
  • During the site orientation, it is the
    responsibility of the supervisor to inform you of
    the type and nature of the oil being handled, and
    the clean up chemicals you might be exposed to.

24
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25
Material Safety Data Sheet
  • The supervisor is responsible for providing
    information on the dangers associated with the
    various petroleum products or clean up chemicals
    and solvents that may be come in contact with.
    All instructions for self protection against
    exposure to these substances can be found on a
    Material Safety Data Sheet.

26
Material Safety Data Sheet
  • There is a right to know about all dangers
    related to any hazardous materials present at a
    clean up site. The supervisor has access to
    copies of Material Safety Data Sheets which will
    be made available on request.

27
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30
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32
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33
Properties of Petroleum
  • Petroleum is an organic liquid primarily
    containing hydrocarbons with smaller percentages
    of sulphur, nitrogen and oxygen. Trace metals can
    also be found. The constituents can be vapour,
    liquid or solid.

34
Properties of Petroleum
  • Gaseous and volatile liquid elements are highly
    flammable and toxic
  • Crude petroleum which is weathered is not
    flammable

35
Properties of Petroleum
  • As the spilled petroleum becomes weathered, it
    become emulsified and forms a mousse like
    consistency.
  • This material adheres to rocks, logs, wharves and
    other objects, creating a slippery hazard for
    shoreline workers.

36
Properties of Petroleum
  • During some of oil spill clean up operations, one
    may be exposed to some petroleum products such as
    solvents or harsh detergents that may be used.
    The application of these substances will only be
    done by trained specialists.

37
Petroleum Vapours
  • The most basic safety consideration related to
    petroleum products is how recent the spill is .
    If it is fresh, there may be a lot of explosive
    vapours, or vapours that are very unhealthy to
    breathe.

38
Petroleum Vapours
  • It is important to be aware of the hazards
    associated with vapours and obtain approval from
    the supervisor before going into a work site.
  • Petroleum vapours are generally heavier than air.
    Even light gases may, when cold, be initially
    heavier than air.

39
Petroleum Vapours
  • Vapours tend to flow to and accumulate in low
    places such as
  • Caves Holes Pits
  • Trenches Sewers Drains
  • Inside dykes Under docks
  • In the bottom of vessels
  • Under piled logs

40
Petroleum Vapours
  • Be aware.
  • Vapours can travel great distances. The dangers
    are not always apparent for example, vapours can
    be trapped beneath a hard crust and released
    during shoreline cleaning.
  • Therefore it is important that one works only in
    the areas posted safe for entry.

41
Controlled Sites
  • Certain areas of a shoreline clean up operation
    are controlled sites. Only authorized and
    trained personnel may enter these areas. They are
    generally marked by yellow tape or signage.
  • Do not cross any barrier unless authorized

42
Controlled Sites
  • Encourage spectators to keep clear of the
    operation and hazards involved
  • Inform your supervisor if you suspect
    unauthorized people on the work site

43
Confined Spaces
  • Confined spaces such as caves and under piles of
    logs pose a particularly serious vapour exposure
    concern for shoreline workers.

44
Confined Spaces
  • Confined spaces may accumulate harmful vapour
    concentrations from decomposing organic matter,
    equipment exhaust fumes and spilled oil, thereby
    reducing the amount of oxygen in the air

45
Symptoms of Exposure
  • The following list outlines some general signs
    and symptoms that indicate vapour exposure
  • Dulled sense of smell Nausea
  • Mental confusion Dizziness
  • Shortness of breath Headaches
  • Loss of consciousness Eye irritation
  • Diminished sense of responsibility

46
Symptoms of Exposure
  • Everyone has different tolerance levels to
    vapours.
  • If you are at all bothered by petroleum vapours
    report immediately to the supervisor. Medical
    attention may be required.

47
Hydrogen Sulphide
  • Hydrogen Sulphide is a toxic vapour associated
    with some petroleum products. It can be lethal.
  • At lower concentrations, the vapour smells like
    rotten eggs. First you smell it, then you dont,
    but it could still be there. Hydrogen Sulphide
    dimishes the sense of smell by attacking the
    nervous system.

48
Hydrogen Sulphide
  • Remember, the absence of smell does NOT mean the
    absence of petroleum vapour. If there is a danger
    of hyydrogen sulphide vapours being present,
    frequent testing of the clean up site will be
    done.

49
Hydrogen Sulphide
  • Safety Precautions
  • Work upwind from oiled areas
  • Do not assume that gases and vapours are harmless
    because they lack odour
  • Do not enter confined spaces until tested and
    posted safe for entry
  • If instructed, use approved respirators according
    to directions provided

50
Hydrogen Sulphide
  • While it is important for ones safety to be
    aware of the dangers associated with petroleum
    vapours, rest assured … the dangers of working
    with these products diminishes from the time the
    spill occurs.
  • Workers are not permitted onto the work site
    until the area has been thoroughly tested and
    posted safe for entry.

51
Exposure to Petroleum Products
  • Common routes of exposure
  • Inhalation
  • Aspiration
  • Ingestion
  • Skin contact

52
Inhalation
  • Inhalation of petroleum products is the act of
    drawing fumes or vapours into the lungs

53
Aspiration
  • Aspiration is the act of breathing petroleum
    products, in liquid form, into the lungs.
  • Aspiration of petroleum products may cause
    serious lung problems such as pneumonia or
    pneumonia edema, and can be fatal.

54
Aspiration
  • Pneumonia edema is the build up of fluid in the
    lungs, which can actually drown the respiratory
    system.
  • Petroleum may be aspired by
  • Falling into petroleum laden waters
  • Breathing petroleum mist or spray

55
Ingestion
  • Inadvertent ingesting of oil can occur when food
    or cigarettes are handled with contaminated.
    Always wash with soap and water before eating or
    smoking.
  • If a considerable of petroleum is ingested, do
    not induce vomiting. Report to the supervisor.
    Medical attention may be required.

56
Skin Contact
  • Skin contact is usually the main exposure to oil
    during shoreline clean up operations
  • Any petroleum product can cause skin cause skin
    problems when absorbed directly through the skin
    layers, hair follicles and glands.

57
Skin Contact
  • Contact with the natural degreasing agents in
    most petroleum products can cause
  • Dermatitis
  • Oil Acne
  • Prolonged exposure to petroleum products can lead
    to harmful short and long term health effects

58
Skin Contact
  • Measures to prevent exposure
  • Wear oil resistant gloves with cotton inner
    gloves
  • Apply protective gels and creams that reduce skin
    penetration and improve skin cleaning
  • Wear oil resistant coveralls or rain gear
  • Wear approved footwear

59
Skin Contact
  • Wear approved eye or face protection
  • When using rags or sorbent pads to remove
    splashes, change them frequently
  • Do not keep oily rags or sorbent pads in your
    pockets

60
Skin Contact
  • Response to skin contact with petroleum products
  • Remove it as quickly as practical
  • Use soap and water, or specially prepared cleaner
  • Do not use harsh soaps. They cause skin
    irritation

61
Other Precautions
  • Warming Fires
  • Warming fires can only be lit if you have
    approval from the supervisor. While comforting,
    these fires can be a source of ignition for oily
    clothing, wastes and other debris.
  • Due to the potential of inhaling emissions, do
    not burn any oily wood or debris in a warming
    fire.

62
Other Precautions
  • Smoking
  • Smoking is not permitted on the work site, due to
    the potential of explosion. Smoking is only
    permitted in designated areas.
  • Lighters and Matches
  • Do not carry lighters or matches onto the work
    site.

63
Other Precautions
  • Electronic Equipment
  • Where designated by the site safety supervisor,
    intrinsically safe equipment, hand held radios
    and flashlights will be utilized at a work site.
  • Do not bring electronic equipment or flashlights
    onto the work site unless approved by the
    supervisor

64
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65
Personal Protective Equipment
66
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67
Personal Protective Equipment
  • The petroleum products and crude oils that you
    may encounter on a shoreline cleanup operation
    may contain substances that can cause harmful
    short and long term health effects.
  • The personal protective equipment and clothing
    assigned is designed to help reduce the chances
    of exposure to these substances .

68
Types of Personal Protective Equipment
  • Approved face mask and eye protection must be
    worn when there is any risk of face or eye injury
  • During sunny periods tinted safety glasses and
    sunscreen that provide high UV protection are
    recommended.

69
Types of Personal Protective Equipment
  • Approved protective footwear must be worn by all
    response personnel while on the work site.
  • Check that footwear is approved with the
    supervisor.

70
Types of Personal Protective Equipment
  • Respiratory protection is generally not required
    for a shoreline cleanup operation
  • In any instance where protection from vapours is
    required, the employee will be provided with
    respiratory protection and instructed in its use.

71
Types of Personal Protective Equipment
  • Approved hearing protection should be used in
    high noise level areas such as around heavy
    equipment, aircraft, operating vac-trucks,
    generators, engines and powerpacks
  • Properly worn hearing protectors reduce noise
    exposure without affecting voice communications.

72
Types of Personal Protective Equipment
  • Approved head protection is required where there
    is potential of being struck from above or
    striking something overhead.

73
Types of Personal Protective Equipment
  • Oil resistant gloves will be worn by all response
    personnel to prevent oil contamination and reduce
    skin exposure and abrasions.

74
Types of Personal Protective Equipment
  • Gloves may need to be taped to sleeves to prevent
    seepage. Cotton gloves are generally worn inside
    the outer gloves. For those with particularly
    sensitive skin, a protective gel or cream can be
    applied to the hands.

75
Types of Personal Protective Equipment
  • Approved lifejackets or Personal Flotation
    Devices
  • These include
  • Floater coats
  • Floater vests
  • Floater suits

76
Types of Personal Protective Equipment
  • Approved lifejackets or Personal Flotation
    Devices must be worn at all times when there is a
    risk of falling in the water.

77
Types of Personal Protective Equipment
  • Protective outerwear such as oil resistant
    coveralls or rain gear should be worn by all
    response personnel to prevent oil contacting the
    skin.
  • Insulated inner clothing is the employees
    responsibility. Wear well insulated inner
    clothing such as woolen socks and sweaters as
    required.

78
Decontamination and Inspection
  • During work it is very likely that petroleum
    products will get onto the personal protective
    equipment and clothing.
  • These contaminants should be removed after every
    shift.

79
Decontamination
  • Wipe off any oil with a sorbant pad or clean rag
  • Inspect the personal protective equipment and
    clothing for rips, tears or other damage
  • Do not dispose of or take away worn personal
    protective equipment or clothing

80
Decontamination
  • Let the supervisor know of ripped or worn
    personal protective clothing so that accurate
    inventory of materials and clothing can be
    maintained. The employee will be resupplied as
    needed.

81
Decontamination
  • Do not take personal protective equipment or
    clothing home. Personal protective equipment and
    clothing will be maintained and laundered by
    designated personnel.

82
Decontamination
  • Wear the personal protective equipment and
    clothing properly as it is for the employees
    protection and safety. Take good care of it, and
    it will take good care of you.

83
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84
Working Environment
85
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86
Working Environment
  • To be able to work safely and to be safe at a
    shoreline clean up operation, it is important
    that the employee knows and understands the
    environmental and work site hazards you may be
    exposed to.

87
Working Environment
  • Some of the hazards that may be encountered
    include
  • Slippery surfaces
  • Poor weather conditions
  • Noise exposure
  • Wildlife
  • Drugs, alcohol and unauthorized firearms

88
Common Injury Causes
  • Slips, trips, falls and strains are the most
    common cause of worker injury during a shoreline
    clean up operation

89
Common Injury Causes
  • Hazards
  • Getting on and off boats (on the shore or at the
    dock
  • Walking on rough terrain
  • Walking on beaches slippery with oil, seaweed or
    ice
  • Handling oily wastes and hand tools

90
Common Injury Causes
  • Preventative measures
  • Wear approved footwear
  • Do not climb rocks
  • Warn co-workers of potential dangers or hazards
  • Avoid stepping on hoses, wires and ropes -
    theymay be under tension and can move or tangle
    unexpectectly

91
Common Injury Causes
  • Handle equipment properly
  • Do not overlaod the bags with watse material
  • Lift with your legs, not you back
  • Ask buddies for help if it is needed
  • Rest when necessary

92
Shoreline Terrain
  • Rock slides occur around vertical, sleeply sloped
    shoreline and undercut banks. Warm temperatures
    can loosen rock from underlying snow or thawing
    ground. Debris from previous slides is a good
    indication of danger.
  • Unstable logs can roll unexpectently when walked
    on, crushing or pinning one or those in the
    vicinity.

93
Shoreline Terrain
  • Wet or oiled logs can extremely slippery.
  • Rising tides can trap you on the beach, blocking
    off escape route at high water.
  • Ocean swells may create the danger of workers
    being washed off the shoreline.

94
Shoreline Terrain
  • Safety
  • Wear approved footwear
  • Wear approved lifejackets of personal flotation
    devices where there is any risk of falling into
    the water
  • Avoid steeply banked shores and beach heads

95
Shoreline Terrain
  • Avoid areas where there is debris from previous
    slides
  • Be sure logs are stable before walking on or near
    them
  • Be cautious around exposed shoreline areas to
    prevent being swamped by high waves or ocean
    swells

96
Shoreline Terrain
  • Know the tidal information for the area you are
    in and always be aware of possible escape routes
  • Check the natural shoreline high tide markers,
    such as washed up debris, loose sea matter, and
    tide lines on rock walls

97
Poor Weather Conditions
  • Weather and sea state vary throughout the country
    because of the influence of large bodies of water
    and geographical land forms. Be prepared for the
    unexpected a well as the forecast weather
    conditions

98
Poor Weather Conditions
  • Poor weather indications include
  • High winds
  • Fog
  • Snow
  • Rain
  • Hot and cold temperatures

99
Hypothermia
  • Hypothermia is
  • The lowering of the bodys core temperature below
    the normal level. This can lead to
    unconciousness, internal injuries or death if not
    properly treated.
  • Cold, wet, windy weather increases the threat of
    hypothermia, if one is not properly dressed

100
Hypothermia
  • The following factors can increase the threat of
    hypothermia if one is not properly dressed
  • Wet clothing
  • Immersion in cold water
  • Exposure to wind chill factors
  • Low temperatures

101
Hypothermia
  • Typical signs of hypothermia are
  • Excessive shivering
  • Slurred speech
  • Mental confusion
  • Pulse and respiration decrease as severity
    increases

102
Hypothermia
  • Preventative measures
  • Monitor oneself and ones buddy for signs of
    fatigue and other signs ov overexposure
  • Dress properly. The supervisor will inform the
    crew of the appropriate personal protective
    equiopment and clothing to wear when exposed to
    the cold

103
Hypothermia
  • It is the workers responsibility to wear well
    insulated inner clothing, such as wool socks and
    sweaters as required
  • If necessary, stop work and take time to recover
  • Report any of these symptoms immediately to the
    supervisor. Medical attention may be required

104
Heat Exhaustion
  • Heat exhaustion occurs when
  • Excessive sweating causes a depletion of body
    fluids
  • Conditions prevent the evaporation of sweat to
    cool the body (high humidity)

105
Heat Exhaustion
  • Hazards
  • Personal protective equipment or clothing
    reducing ventilation and may lead to heat
    exhaustion or heat stroke
  • Strenuous work in an area of high humidity

106
Heat Exhaustion
  • Typical signs of heat exhaustion are
  • Pulse, weak and rapid
  • Respiration, rapid and shallow
  • Sweating
  • Nausea
  • Skin, cold and clammy
  • Headaches
  • Dizziness

107
Heat Exhaustion
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Preventative measures
  • Watch oneself and ones buddy for signs and
    symptoms of overexposure
  • If necessary, stop work and take time to recover

108
Heatstroke
  • Prolonged exposure in a hot, humid, poorly
    ventilated environment puts stress on the body as
    it attempts to cool itself
  • Heatstroke occurs when the bodys temperature
    regulatory system fails, sweating ceases and the
    body temperature rises rapidly

109
Heatstroke
  • Symptoms of heatstroke include
  • Rapid pulse
  • Breathing - deep, noisy
  • Dry, hot flushed skin
  • Headaches, dizziness
  • Mental confusion
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Convulsions

110
Heatstroke
  • Preventative measures
  • Watch oneself and ones buddy for sign and
    symptoms of fatigue and overexposure
  • If necessary stop work and take time to recover

111
Heatstroke
  • Report any of these symptoms immediately to the
    supervisor. Medical attention may be required

112
Noise Exposure
  • Noise exposure from boats, generators, pumps,
    aircraft, winches and other commonly used
    equipment can be reduced with proper hearing
    protection.
  • Work extra carefully around noise. Be aware of
    and be prepared to use universal hand signals to
    communicate.

113
Wildlife
  • Wildlifes strong survival instinct can lead to
    serious physical injury to their captors.
  • Distressed birds
  • React to handling by striking out and pecking at
    any area within reach, such as the hands or eyes.

114
Wildlife
  • Otters
  • Can also react in a dangerous fashion, but with
    more ferocity and extremely painful results.

115
Wildlife
  • All wildlife capture and treatment must be left
    to personnel trained and equipped in wildlife
    rescue, such as members of the Canadian Wildlife
    Service

116
Wildlife
  • Bears, cougars and wolves
  • They are common to remote shoreline areas.
    Generally the reason they are on the beach is to
    forage for food.
  • Being disturbed may cause them to react
    aggressively. Be aware that all wild animals are
    a danger.

117
Wildlife
  • Safety Precautions
  • Do not attract the animals by feeding them or
    leaving open food or garbage at the work site
  • If a large wild animal is seen in the area, l
    eave and report to the supervisor

118
Wildlife
  • Domestic Animals
  • Dogs have been kn own to react violently with
    people trespassing on their territory

119
Wildlife
  • Vermin
  • Be aware of any vermin such as rats, mice or
    snakes that may be present on the work site. Be
    especially cautious when working around docks and
    wharves. Although small, these creatures can
    inflict painful bites.

120
Drugs, Alcohol and Unauthorized Firearms
  • These man-made potential hazards are not
    conducive to a safe safe shoreline clean up
    oeration, and are therefore NOT PERMITTED on the
    work site.

121
Drugs, Alcohol and Unauthorized Firearms
  • Drugs (Substance Abuse)
  • Only over the counter and prescription medication
    that will not cause drowsiness and impair your
    ability to work, are permitted on the work site.
  • Workers must advise their supervisor of any
    medical conditions or medications they may be
    taking.

122
Drugs, Alcohol and Unauthorized Firearms
  • Alcohol
  • Alcohol is not permitted on the work site
  • Drunkenness will not tolerated

123
Drugs, Alcohol and Unauthorized Firearms
  • Unauthorized Firearms
  • Only authorized personnel, such as enforcement
    oficers, or those assigned the task of providing
    protection from dangerous wildlife, are permitted
    to carry firearms.

124
Drugs, Alcohol and Unauthorized Firearms
  • Report the use of illegal drugs, alcohol or the
    presence of unauthorized firearms to the
    supervisor.

125
Equipment and Transportation
126
Equipment and Transportation
  • Shoreline clean up operations often involve the
    use of a large variety of eequipment and types of
    transportation. This type of equipment should
    only be handled by experienced, trained personnel.

127
Helicopters and Fixed Wing Aircraft
  • When approaching or departing a helicopter or
    fixed wing aircraft
  • Do not approach, leave or board until signalled
    to do so by the pilot
  • Approach and leave the helicopter from the front,
    always within view of the pilot

128
Helicopters and Fixed Wing Aircraft
  • Walk under the blades in a crouched position. The
    blade tips may come within 1.5 metres of level
    ground
  • All equipment and tools must be carried in a
    horizontal position below waist level
  • Never walk up slope away from a helicopter or
    down slope towards a helicopter

129
Helicopters and Fixed Wing Aircraft
  • Any loose articles of clothing (scarfs, caps,
    hard hats, etc.) must be properly secured before
    approaching or leaving a helicopter
  • Lash down all cargo securely before leaving the
    ground. This is to prevent cargo from shifting
    dangerously during flight

130
Helicopters and Fixed Wing Aircraft
  • Ensure doors are closed and latched

131
Helicopters and Fixed Wing Aircraft
  • When travelling in a helicopter
  • Remain in your seat
  • Seat belts must be fastened at all times during
    flight
  • Smoking is not permitted
  • Life jackets must be worn when in a helicopter
    over water

132
Fixed Wing Aircraft
  • Approved personal flotation devices are not
    required to be worn in fixed wing aircraft, but
    sufficient suits must be provided for all on
    board.

133
Boat and Water Operations
  • Safety precautions
  • Wear an approved floatation device or life jacket
  • Always follow instructions given by the boat
    operator
  • Handle ropes carefully
  • Get on and off boats safely and carefully

134
Boat and Water Operations
  • While all water operations and related safety
    gear are governed by applicable government
    regulations, its still your responsibility to
    access boats in a safe manner and abide by the
    operators instructions.
  • Check with the supervisor if there is any
    uncertainty about the life jacket or personal
    floatation device is approved.

135
Land Transportation
  • Bulldozers, trucks and other machinery used on
    the work site can be hazardous.
  • Three basic rules to follow when working around
    heavy machinery are
  • Never walk behind the equipment while it is being
    operated

136
Land Transportation
  • Never walk where the operator cannot see
  • Keep an eye on the machinery at all times

137
Hand Tools
  • Hand tools are one of the most common types of
    equipment used for shoreline clean up. The use of
    rakes, shovels, axes and peaveys involves some
    basic dos and donts

138
Rakes
  • Do keep all raking motions below the waist
  • Do watch handle butt to avoid hitting ones buddy
  • Do not leave lying on the ground especially the
    the tines up
  • Do not use a lever

139
Shovels
  • Do keep shovel below waist
  • Do keep loads light
  • Do turn in the direction one is loading or
    unloading
  • Dont throw loads over the shoulder
  • Do not twist the waist when turning to unload

140
Shovels
  • Do not leave the tool lying on the ground
  • Do not use as a lever

141
Collection Bags
  • Do work as a team when filling and carrying bags
  • Do use correct lifting techniques - lift with the
    legs, not the back
  • Dont overload bags
  • Dont stack bags on top of one another, as the
    bottom ones may break

142
Machetes and Axes
  • Do wear approved footwear and gloves
  • Do be aware of other nearby workers
  • Do avoid rocks
  • Do always walk with axes, machetes and any sharp
    tools in protective sheaths
  • Do ensure firm footing and swing clearance

143
Machetes and Axes
  • Dont leave on ground or unsheathed
  • Dont use in log piles where there is no
    clearance to swing the axe or machete

144
Peaveys
  • Do inspect and assess the situation
  • Do know where the log will move
  • Do work only on firm footing
  • Do ensure all other workers are clear

145
Peaveys
  • Dont work with logs up above
  • Do not work in complex log piles
  • Do not leave lying on the ground

146
Pitch Forks
  • Do keep all motion below the waist
  • Do keep loads light
  • Do turn in the location one is loading or
    unloading

147
Pitch Forks
  • Dont leave lying on the ground particularly with
    the prongs up
  • Do not use as a lever
  • Do not throw loads over the shoulder
  • Do not twist the waist when turning to unload
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