eCommerce eBusiness - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – eCommerce eBusiness PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 1724e-OTA4M



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

eCommerce eBusiness

Description:

AOL and NetZero. AOL Cost Structure: Subscription rate ~$20 ... How does NetZero generate revenues? Sumit Sarkar, UT Dallas. Advertising on the Net ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:454
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 91
Provided by: sumits6
Learn more at: http://www.utdallas.edu
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: eCommerce eBusiness


1
e-Commerce e-Business
Sumit Sarkar Varghese S. Jacob University of
Texas at Dallas
2
Overview
  • E-Commerce Part I
  • Industry segments
  • e-commerce/e-business drivers
  • Business models
  • Design elements
  • E-Commerce Part II
  • Technology infrastructure
  • Levels of online presence
  • Readings
  • Chapter 7 from the text

3
e-Commerce
  • , electronic commerce is a way of conducting,
    managing, and executing business transactions
    using computer and telecommunications networks.
  • Frontiers of Electronic Commerce, Kalakota
    Whinston, Addison-Wesley Publishing Company,
    Inc., 1996

4
e-Business
  • , redefining business models, with the aid of
    technology, to maximize (customer) value.
  • e-Business Roadmap for Success, Kalakota
    Robinson, Addison-Wesley Publishing Company,
    Inc., 1999

5
Industry Segments
  • Within-business
  • Internal electronic mail and messaging
  • Knowledge management
  • Logistics, corporate finance, and personnel
    systems
  • Business-to-business (B-to-B)
  • Supply chain management for inventory,
    distribution, and warehousing
  • Net markets and infomediaries
  • Business-to-consumer (B-to-C)
  • Online publishing of corporate documents,
    catalogs, etc.
  • Convenience shopping, e.g., Books, Toys,
    Financial services
  • Tracking orders and shipments
  • Consumer-to-consumer (C-to-C)
  • Auctions
  • Also C2B, B2G, etc.

6
B-to-C Retailing on the Web
Total consumer spending in 1999 17.3
Billion Projected spending in 2003 86.3
Billion Source WSJ, October 23, 2000, p. R4
(citing Jupiter Research)
7
PEOPLE ONLINE GLOBAL
  • NUA Internet Surveys (www.nua.ie/surveys/)

8
INTERNET USAGE STATISTICS
  • WEEKLY USAGE (Nielsen//NetRatings)

9
Internet Adoption Rates
  • Number of years to reach 50 million users
  • Radio 38 years
  • TV 13 years
  • Cable 10 years
  • Internet 5 years

10
B-to-C Retailing on the Web
Source WSJ, October 23, 2000, p. R4 (citing
Jupiter Research)
11
ECOMMERCE s in US
  • FORRESTER RESEARCH (Billions)

12
Industry Segments Another View
  • Pure play
  • Amazon
  • Yahoo
  • Clicks and mortar
  • Barnes and Noble
  • Gateway

13
e-Commerce Traditional Commerce
  • Strategic decisions tightly linked to technology
  • Content, storefront, customer service
  • 247 availability
  • Consumer expectations altered
  • Computer-based customer interface
  • Less opportunity for human intervention
  • Customer controls the interaction
  • Time spent at each site, price comparison
  • Knowledge of customer behaviour
  • Track customer behaviour to provide customized
    offerings
  • Competitive response in real time
  • Competitors can relatively easily monitor a
    companys offerings

14
Important Drivers
  • Moores Law
  • Metcalfs Law
  • Transaction cost economics
  • Unleashing the Killer App, Larry Downes and
    Chunka Mui, Harvard Business School Press, 2000

15
Moores Law
Every eighteen months, processing power doubles,
at constant cost.
16
Metcalfes Law
The utility of a network is proportional to the
square of the number of its users.
17
Transaction Costs
  • Search costs
  • Information costs
  • Bargaining costs
  • Decision costs
  • Policing costs
  • Enforcement costs

18
Coases Nature of the Firm
  • Firms are created because the additional cost of
    organizing and maintaining them is cheaper than
    the transaction costs involved when individuals
    conduct business with each other in the open
    market.
  • What functions should a firm conduct internally?
    Those activities that cannot be performed more
    cheaply in the market.

19
Technology and Transaction Costs
  • Technology reduces several components of the
    transaction cost
  • E.g., Bank transactions
  • Branches - 1.07/transaction
  • ATM - 0.27/transaction
  • Internet - 0.10/transaction
  • Implication Firms should get bigger?
  • Market also becomes more efficient!
  • More competition
  • Friction-free economy should lead to virtual
    organizations

20
Impact on a firms Value Chain
  • A firm achieves competitive advantage when it can
    link its value chain activities more cheaply, or
    use these activities to provide more value, than
    its competitors.
  • May require reconfiguring activities in the value
    chain
  • Firms also need to examine the value system for
    opportunities to improve efficiencies
  • E.g., more outsourcing

21
Impact on Value Chain (cont.)
  • Customer facing activities
  • Internal activities
  • Supply chain

22
Value Creation
How can the Internet technologies impact these
activities?
23
Value Chain (cont.)
24
Impacting The Value Chain
25
Electronic Data Interchange (EDI)
  • Computer-to-computer links between trading
    partners
  • purchase orders
  • invoices
  • confirmations
  • shipping notices
  • Reduces cycle time, streamlines business
    processes
  • WALMART Moving towards zero inventories

26
EDI Illustration
27
Web-based EDI Example
  • Nuovo Pignone (turbine maker in Italy)
  • Few large suppliers 70-80 of supplies
  • Many small suppliers 20-30 of supplies
  • JIT Manufacturing Must track ALL incoming
    shipments
  • Developed protected web site
  • Suppliers can use browser to interface with the
    system
  • Currency of information From 1 week to 1 day

28
B-to-B Evolution
  • Non web-based EDI
  • Standardized formats for information exchange
  • Point-to-point
  • Web-based EDI
  • Hub and Spoke (and not point-to-point)
  • Secure, Cheaper, Easier to use, Scalable,
    Flexible
  • Infomediaries
  • Provide marketplace for fragmented buyers and
    sellers

29
B-to-B Characteristics
  • Huge Market Opportunity
  • Business Models Can be Enormously Profitable
  • Higher Barriers to Entry (than B-to-C)
  • Relatively higher switching costs
  • More Capital Intensive
  • Technology
  • Customer Acquisition
  • Brand Building

30
Web-based EDI
  • International Data Corporation (IDC) forecast
  • 1999
    2003
  • EDI Services 1.1B 2.3B
  • Web-based 12 41

31
Business Models
  • A value proposition for the customer
  • Target segment
  • Market size and growth rates
  • Customer benefits
  • Unmet or insufficiently met customer needs
  • Competitive advantage
  • Marketpower
  • Cost advantage
  • Differentiaition capabilities
  • Value cluster combination of benefits

32
Types of Business Models
  • Merchant
  • Sale of products or services (Dell, Cisco)
  • Subscription
  • Subscriber fees (newspapers, magazines, etc.)
  • Brokerage
  • Fee based on transaction facilitated by site
    (eTrade, Chemdex)
  • Advertising
  • Banner ads, interstitials, site sponsorships
    (Yahoo)
  • Affiliate
  • Direct customer to merchant site (Associates for
    Amazon)

33
Example ISP Market
AOL and NetZero AOL Cost Structure Subscription
rate 20 Average communication cost/subscriber
hr 0.40 Average communication
time/subscriber 27 hours Average
communication cost/subscriber 10 (Exclusive
of people, overheads, etc.) How does NetZero
generate revenues?
34
Advertising on the Net
Web Vs Total Advertising Expenditures (estimates)
Source Veronis Suhler Associates and
BancAmerica Corp., 1998
35
ADVERTISING REVENUE (Est.)
Projected Ad Revenues in the US (Billion )
  • www.nua.ie/surveys/

36
Another Example E-Trade
  • Efficient back office
  • Front-office automation
  • Eliminate humans
  • Marketing
  • Access
  • Phone, Internet
  • Low price
  • Uncomplicated pricing
  • Advertising, positioning

37
Brand Name
  • Building Trust
  • Deliver quality product/service
  • Generate good word-of-mouth
  • Strategic alliances

38
Brand Name (Cont.)
  • MARKETING BUDGET FOR 1998
  • Amazon 133 M
  • eTrade 71.3M
  • BarnesandNoble.com 70.4M
  • CDNow Inc 44.6M
  • Cost to launch a new consumer brand on the web
    50M-100M
  • Should click and mortar firms use new or existing
    brands?

39
Design Elements The 7 Cs
  • Shift from people-mediated to technology mediated
    interface has important design implications
  • Context
  • Content
  • Commerce
  • Community
  • Customization
  • Communication
  • Connection
  • These elements must be compatible
  • E-Commerce J. F. Rayport and B. J. Jaworski,
    McGraw Hill, 2001

40
Design Elements Context
  • Aesthetic and functional look and feel
  • Function
  • Pagination and linking structure (usability)
  • Navigation tools
  • Response times
  • Reliability
  • Aesthetics (form)
  • Visual theme
  • Color, images, fonts, etc.

41
Design Elements Content
  • Subject matter on the site
  • Geared towards providing goods and services
  • Books
  • Flowers
  • Airline tickets
  • Information products
  • News
  • Stock quotes
  • Weather reports
  • Mixed offerings
  • Stock quotes and stock trading

42
Design Elements Commerce
  • Ability to execute transactions
  • Prominent features
  • Registration
  • Shopping cart
  • Security
  • Order tracking
  • Delivery options
  • Pricing options
  • Catalog price
  • Auction (buyers bid)
  • Reverse auction (sellers bid)
  • Demand aggregation (e.g., Mercata.com)
  • Net markets (e.g., stock trading)

43
Design Elements Community
  • Provide users a sense of involvement
  • E.g., LandsEnd has Shop With a Friend feature
  • Dimensions
  • Interactive (e.g., chat, buddy lists)
  • Non-interactive (e.g., member web pages)
  • Types of communities (one classification)
  • Just friends
  • Enthusiasts (special interest groups)
  • Support groups (friend in need)
  • Players (game-playing)
  • Traders

44
Design Elements Customization
  • Geared to user preferences
  • Cookies (temporary files in local machines)
  • Personalization (initiated by user)
  • Registration
  • Content and layout configuration
  • Tailoring (sites dynamically customized)
  • Past behavior
  • Collaborative filtering

45
Design Elements Communication
  • Dialog between organization and user
  • Broadcast
  • Mass mailings
  • FAQs
  • Interactive
  • E-mails (regarding order placement, tracking,
    delivery, etc.)

46
Design Elements Connection
  • Linkages between a site and other sites
  • Destination sites
  • Site generated content, with few links to other
    sites
  • Portals
  • Gateway to a large number of other sites
  • Affiliate
  • Directs users to destination sites (referral
    services)

47
Design Elements Business Model
  • Elements should support the value proposition
  • Schwab.com
  • Commerce centered, with emphasis on content and
    function (context)
  • Some degree of customization
  • Community is less important
  • Yahoo.com
  • Context, community, and connection are important
  • Content, commerce less important

48
Case JusticeLink, Inc.
  • Enables electronic filing, electronic certified
    service, and electronic storage of documents
    generated by multiparty litigation suits
  • Provides electronic document management and
    improved access to case files
  • Reduces physical space requirements of document
    storage

49
JusticeLink, Inc.
  • Which activities of a courts value chain are
    being impacted by JusticeLinks offering? Which
    activities of a law firms value chain are being
    impacted by JusticeLinks offering?
  • What should Justice-links business model be in
    the short term?
  • If JusticeLink wants to charge for its services,
    how should they price their services? Should the
    pricing scheme be the same for law firms as it is
    for the courts?
  • What organizational issues affect adoption of
    these services by courts? by law firms?
  • What are key technology issues for JusticeLink?
  • How should JusticeLinks business model evolve in
    the long term? What would be their competition?

50
Overview
  • E-Commerce Part I
  • Industry segments
  • e-commerce/e-business drivers
  • Business models
  • Design elements
  • E-Commerce Part II
  • Technology infrastructure
  • Levels of online presence

51
Technology Issues
  • Internet services
  • HTML, XML, and WML standards
  • Static and dynamic content delivery
  • Performance issues
  • Getting people to visit your site

52
The Internet
  • Collection of independently operated networks
    that exchange traffic using open standards
  • Uses TCP/IP as the communication protocol
  • Network carries packets
  • Multiple types of information can be communicated
    using these services
  • Voice, data, image, and video
  • Who manages the Internet?
  • Reference http//www.isoc.org/

53
Important Internet Services
  • Mail
  • E-mail and mailing lists
  • Remote file transfer
  • FTP File Transfer Protocol
  • Remote login
  • Telnet Remote Terminal Protocol
  • World Wide Web
  • Computers supporting hypertext and related
    functions (e.g., HTTP Hyper Text Transfer
    Protocol)
  • Others ...

54
The World Wide Web Browsers
  • WWW Collection of hyper-linked web sites on the
    internet
  • Mosaic First graphical Internet document display
    program (Web browser) developed by NCSA
  • Netscape Continued development of Mosaic
  • hypertext and hypermedia
  • formatted electronic text (bold, italics)
  • layout elements (frames, tables, bullets)
  • plug-ins (audio, video, encryption, ...)
  • Internet Explorer (Microsoft)
  • Several others ...

55
IP Addresses
  • Each computer (host) on the Internet has an
    IP-address
  • 32 bits long (4 bytes)
  • e.g., 129.110.10.20
  • The four numbers in an IP address are used to
    identify a particular network and a host on that
    network
  • Original design five classes of networks
  • Class A first byte fixed (first byte between
    0-127)
  • supports 16 million hosts on each of 128
    networks
  • Class B first two bytes fixed (first byte
    between 128-191)
  • supports 65,000 hosts on each of 16,000 networks
  • Class C first three bytes fixed (first byte
    between 192-223)
  • supports 254 hosts on each of 2 million networks
  • Classes D and E (first byte 240 or higher)
  • reserved for special purposes

56
Domain Names
  • IP-address are inconvenient to remember
  • e.g., 129.110.10.20
  • Domain names are aliases for IP addresses
  • e.g., www.utdallas.edu
  • Two types of Top-Level Domains (TLDs)
  • Generic Domains
  • .com, .org, .net, .edu, .gov, .mil, .int
  • 7 new ones added recently .biz, .info, .pro,
    .name, .aero, .coop, .musuem (should become
    available Summer 2001)
  • Country Code Domains
  • .uk, .de, .jp, .in, etc.

57
DNS Domain Name System
  • Phone book for the Internet Distributed database
    (DNS) keeping track of IP-addresses and
    corresponding IP-number
  • To identify (reach) a computer on the Internet,
    can use either the IP-address or the IP-number
  • Tree Structure (currently 13 root level servers
    worldwide)

58
Who Assigns Domain Names?
  • Managed by Internet Corporation for Assigned
    Names and Numbers (ICANN) http//www.icann.org/
  • Non-profit private organization established in
    1998
  • Coordinates the assignment of globally unique
  • IP addresses
  • Internet domain names
  • Root server system management
  • Several companies registered with ICANN provide
    Domain Name registration services
  • e.g., DomainRegistry.com charges 30 to register
    (per year)

59
Domain Names and IP Addresses
  • Are there enough IP Addresses?
  • Static addresses and dynamic addresses
  • IPv6 16-byte addresses (currently IPv4)
  • 3.2 1038 unique addresses
  • Trademarks and Domain Names
  • US trademark law allows multiple concurrent use
    of same name by
  • Different people in same business in different
    places
  • Substantially different businesses in same place
  • The Internet requires exactly one organization
    (person) have a single second-level domain
  • Cybersquatters
  • Arbitration based on Uniform Dispute Resolution
    Policy (ICANN)
  • Ref Communications of the ACM, Feb 2001, Vol.
    44, no. 2, pp. 91-97

60
Web Content
  • Small static content
  • HTML pages, small images
  • Large static content
  • Audio/video
  • Streaming media
  • Dynamic content
  • Queries to databases
  • Key issues
  • Communication protocols (e.g., http hypertext
    transfer protocol)
  • Standard encoding of content (e.g., HTML
    HyperTEXT Markup Language)
  • Web-database integration (CGI Common Gateway
    Interface)

61
Web Servers
  • A Web server is a computer with
  • an IP address
  • must be connected to the Internet
  • publicly readable directory
  • location of Web pages
  • Web server software
  • manages file access and protection
  • When you read a Web page
  • your Web browser requests transfer of the file
    that contains the page (including all the files
    read by that page)
  • your Web browser displays the page based on the
    rules contained in the file (HTML, Java, Perl,
    etc.)

62
HTML Hyper Text Markup Language
  • URL Uniform Resource Locator
  • E.g. http//www.utdallas.edu/sumit/index.htm
  • Enables text formatting
  • Hypertext links to other documents
  • Hypertext links to other locations in the same
    document
  • Embed images, sound files, etc.

63
HTML Example
  • Example Output as viewed using a browser
  • HTML code
  • List of employees
  • Alan, abc_at_zzz.com
  • Bing, bcd_at_zzz.com

64
XML Extensible Markup Language
  • HTML documents are unstructured and so it is
    difficult to build intelligent applications based
    on HTML content
  • XML is a Meta markup language
  • XML focuses on the structure of the document
  • Important component for automating workflow
    technology, e.g., allow specification of
    procurement rules in software (how orders get
    routed for approval)
  • Broad industry support
  • Parsers bundled with leading browsers
  • http//msdn.microsoft.com/xml/tutorial

65
XML Example
  • List of Employees
  • Alan
  • abc_at_zzz.com
  • Bing
  • bcd_at_zzz.com

66
XML (Cont.)
  • Does not provide any instructions on how data is
    to be displayed
  • Such instructions are provided in separate
    stylesheets
  • XSL XML Stylesheet Language
  • Applications can understand XML data (in theory)
  • Limitations
  • XML is not completely defined
  • Companies need to extend XML to enable
    interactions (plug-and-play is not a reality yet)
  • Vendors (Ariba, CommerceOne) are in a standards
    battle

67
Static Web Pages
68
Web Database Integration
  • CGI Common Gateway Interface
  • Programs written in Perl, C, etc.
  • Called scripts
  • When a link to a CGI script is activated, the CGI
    program is executed (instead of a document served
    to requester)
  • Vendor specific application programming
    interfaces (APIs)
  • Active Server Pages, Cold Fusion Markup Language,
    Server Side Java Script

69
Web-Databases on the Internet
70
WML Wireless Markup Language
  • Markup Language used on micro browsers running on
    handheld devices
  • WML is an XML Data Type Definition (DTD)
  • WAP Wireless Access Protocol
  • Defacto standard for mobile access to
    Internet-based content

71
Performance Issues
  • End-to-end response time
  • 8-second rule experiments have shown that
    click-out rates increase rapidly after that
  • Includes server-side response time network time
  • Site availability
  • 99.5 or higher
  • Session throughput
  • E.g., 30,000 sessions per day

72
Capacity Planning Load
  • Workload forecasting (peak loads)
  • Number of visitors to site
  • Number of requests per visitor
  • Future growth

73
Capacity Planning Resources
  • Resources
  • Network
  • Connection to the Internet (e.g., T1 line)
  • Local Area Networks (e.g., 100BaseT Ethernet)
  • Servers Hardware (and Software)
  • Web servers (e.g., Apache)
  • Application servers (e.g., ColdFusion)
  • Database servers (e.g., ORACLE)

74
Configuration alternatives
  • Use Benchmarking to identify potential
    bottlenecks
  • Device utilizations for current and future
    demands
  • Several tools available (e.g., Loadrunner from
    MercuryInteractive)
  • Configuration alternatives
  • Connection to the Internet (DSL, Fractional T1,
    T1, T3, etc.)
  • LANs (10BaseT, 100BaseT, 1000BaseTX)
  • Mirror web server or replace with faster server
  • Increase storage capacity and reliability (RAID
    technologies)
  • DBMS versions (TPC benchmarks)

75
Getting People to Visit Your Site
  • Basic techniques
  • Advertisements
  • TV, print, outdoor, mailers (email and regular
    mail), banners
  • Links from other sites
  • Word of mouth
  • Citations in news media (magazines, newspapers,
    etc.)
  • Search engines
  • A majority of users use search engines to locate
    sites of interest

76
Search Engine Strategies
  • Search engines rank sites based on match
    between search terms and site content
  • How do you make your site appear on top of list?
  • Register with search engines- Some search engines
    have free registration, while others have a
    charge
  • Identify relevant category
  • Reverse engineer search engine algorithms
  • Role of Meta tags, headers, title, frequency of
    search term in page
  • Can consider different versions for different
    search engines (version management may be costly)

77
Other Important Issues in e-Commerce
  • Security
  • Web sites
  • customer sites (viruses)
  • payment information
  • Privacy
  • sniffer programs (vendors collecting information
    from browsing customers)
  • anonymity of purchases (credit cards leave a
    trail that can be followed)
  • Trust
  • What do you know about your customer?
  • What do you know about the vendor?
  • How is it different from face-to-face interaction?

78
Security Issues
  • Confidentiality
  • Message integrity
  • Authentication
  • Non-repudiation
  • Access control

79
Firewalls
  • Mechanism to control access between
  • Trusted private network Untrusted outside
    network
  • Protects the integrity of the network as well as
    the confidential information held within it
  • Implemented using routers or special purpose
    computers that examine data flowing into and out
    of a network
  • Placed between organisations network and every
    connection to the internet
  • Two commonly used types
  • Packet level firewall
  • Application level firewall

80
The Intranet
81
The Extranet
82
E-Commerce Development
  • Six levels of online activities
  • Minimal online presence
  • Online catalog
  • Online order entry
  • Automated value chain
  • Market site
  • Super market site
  • Reference The six levels of E-Commerce
    development, Steve Marchak, The Info-Tech
    Research Group

83
I. Minimal online presence
  • Motivation pressure from media, employees,
    customers, competitors
  • Corporate website
  • Promote the company
  • Non-transactional functions like Human Resources
    and Financial data
  • E-mail links to specific employees in public
    relations
  • Management/Technology Implementation issues
  • Decide what goes online
  • Technology requirements are minimal

84
II. Online Catalog
  • Motivation prospective customers asking for more
    information
  • Provide product/service information online
  • Offer better service to existing customers
  • Attract new customers (comparison shopping)
  • Customers use existing offline ordering processes
  • Reduce workload for customer support activity
    (maybe)
  • E.g., car manufacturers
  • Management/Technology Implementation issues
  • High volume of information - high maintenance
  • May need to integrate with offline systems
    depending on complexity

85
III. Online Order Entry
  • Motivation Internet as another distribution
    channel
  • Customers place orders online
  • Catalogs integrated with transaction processing
    systems
  • Customer information recorded automatically
  • Reuse address information, Credit card
    information, etc.
  • Reduce transaction costs (company? customer?)
  • Suggestive selling
  • Management/Technology Implementation issues
  • Fulfillment - inhouse or outsourced
  • Build traffic to site (Pure play Vs Click and
    mortar)
  • Secure services
  • Integrate with other operational systems
  • Potential channel conflict

86
IV. Automated Value Chain
  • Motivation Reduce cycle times (and costs)
  • Orders tied to manufacturing plan, purchasing,
    and supplier systems
  • Customers place and track orders online
  • Sales and post sales support
  • Personalization of products and services
  • Vendors can provide JIT deliveries
  • Access to inventory information
  • Management/Technology Implementation issues
  • Which parts of the value chain can be automated
  • How much information to share with
    vendors/customers
  • May lead to major organizational change (e.g.,
    vertical integration)

87
V. Market Site
  • Motivation One stop shop for competing products
    and services
  • Role of an intermediary
  • Customers find information on all competing
    products on one site with the ability to purchase
  • Vendors have access to customer data
  • Chat groups enabling suppliers and customers to
    interact
  • E.g., Chemdex
  • Management/Technology Implementation issues
  • Build a critical mass of transactions
  • Include as many competitors as possible
  • Convince customers that information is objective

88
VI. Super Market Site
  • Motivation Transact complementary products and
    services - focus is on volume of transactions
  • Customers find information on all competing and
    complementary products on one site with the
    ability to purchase
  • E.g., VerticalNet
  • Management/Technology Implementation issues
  • How to move into other markets

89
Review
  • Online strategy is closely tied to business model
    (value proposition for customers)
  • Execution is critical
  • Must consider design elements carefully in the
    context of the business model
  • Design elements drive technology requirements
  • Plan for change

90
Future of the Internet
  • It is difficult to make predictions, especially
    about the future
  • Yogi Berra

91
Case VerticalNet
  • What criteria does VerticalNet use in choosing
    markets to enter?
  • What design elements are key to their strategy?
  • What is the current business model? Does it need
    rethinking?
  • How should VerticalNet transition the selling
    effort?
  • Is there a first mover advantage in this market
    space?
About PowerShow.com