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Expectations vs. Reality: The Promise, Perils, and Outcomes of Online Learning in Hybrid and Distance Education Courses

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The Promise, Perils, and Outcomes of Online Learning in Hybrid and. Distance Education Courses ... to take a single online course or complete a whole degree ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Expectations vs. Reality: The Promise, Perils, and Outcomes of Online Learning in Hybrid and Distance Education Courses


1
Expectations vs. Reality The Promise, Perils,
and Outcomes of Online Learning in Hybrid and
Distance Education Courses
  • Saxon Reasons, Ed.D., saxrea_at_usi.edu
  • Kevin Valadares, Ph.D., kvaladar_at_usi.edu
  • Michael Slavkin, Ph.D., mslavkin_at_usi.edu

2
Promises
  • Online learning benefits
  • Ability to lift barriers of time and space
  • Opportunity for students to take a single online
    course or complete a whole degree
  • Ability for faculty to create a learning
    environment that allows participation by more
    students
  • Hybrid format
  • Touted as best of both worlds
  • Can mean different things F2F online, online
    another medium

3
Perils
  • What is good online instruction?
  • Potential confusion with hybrid model
  • Lack of student awareness about online learning
  • Poor advisement into online courses
  • Student expectation regarding level of engagement
  • Conditioning by prior experience with other
    online courses

4
Outcomes
  • Pedagogical outcomes
  • Reflection on prior experience with DE
  • Student response to various teaching tools
  • Numbers of students in courses
  • Faculty workload
  • Riding the wave each term
  • Student outcomes
  • Grades comparison
  • Number of hits on course website
  • Course participation
  • Student reflection on learning process
    (metacognition)

5
Challenges of Student Disengagement
  • Lack of motivation
  • Lack of time management skills
  • Intellectual immaturity

6
Lack of Motivation
  • Active learning, a hallmark of good online
    education, is uncomfortable.
  • Increased accountability is a reality for both
    students and faculty.
  • Online learning environment may bring out
    extremes
  • Possible disengagement if student is overly
    organized/not at all
  • Immediacy is emphasized, which is both good and
    bad.
  • Some struggle with mechanics of utilizing course
    site.
  • Confusion may be generated in the hybrid
    environment.
  • Course organization component can seem forced,
    especially compared to F2F.

7
Motivation Strategies
  • Try various forms of communication to reach
    students (ex. audio streams and telephone calls).
  • Communicate and reinforce your expectations and
    consequences to students.
  • Utilize the discussion board for a multitude of
    purposes.
  • Start tough and ease up.

8
Lack of Time Management Skills
  • Faculty challenges
  • Consistency in presentation and communication
    timing
  • Beware of what you ask for (emails, number and
    strategic use of discussion boards).
  • Struggles with scalability still occur.
  • Student challenges
  • Out-of-sight is out-of-mind (no regular F2F
    reinforcement)
  • Prior experience with non-engaging or static
    online courses, or with faculty who do not
    respond
  • Discomfort with subtle changes

9
Time Management Strategies
  • Be experimental and have a flexible attitude
    about what is/is not working.
  • Anticipate student difficulty with changes in
    teaching methods you use.
  • Be aware that online courses sometimes require
    more extensive overhauls than F2F courses each
    term.
  • Think big, but use baby steps.
  • Communicate scalability concerns with
    administration.

10
Intellectual Immaturity
  • Younger students may not be as pre-disposed as
    older students to success in online courses.
  • Hybrid sections may create confusion if students
    are looking for cues in wrong place (F2F or
    online).
  • Students not comfortable with challenges of new
    teaching methods, such as DB or group work (want
    to keep it as superficial as possiblereflection
    is uncomfortable).
  • Even though the expectations are explicit,
    students may still not respond to assignments.

11
Intellectual Immaturity Strategies
  • Manage entrance into online courses
  • (ex. permission-only status, computer
    experience, pre-requisites, effective advising).
  • Utilize online survey function as a means of
    assessing student understanding of content.
  • Recruit successful DE students to act as mentors.

12
Expectations vs. Reality The Promise, Perils,
and Outcomes of Online Learning in Hybrid and
Distance Education Courses
  • Saxon Reasons, Ed.D., saxrea_at_usi.edu
  • Kevin Valadares, Ph.D., kvaladar_at_usi.edu
  • Michael Slavkin, Ph.D., mslavkin_at_usi.edu
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