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Systems of Care in Education

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Title: Systems of Care in Education


1
Systems of Care in Education
Partnership for Success Elkhart Community
Schools, Oaklawn Center, Elkhart County System
of Care
2
Systems of Care and Schools Why?
  • Consider
  • the relationship between….
  • the social/emotional needs of children
  • and
  • their academic achievement

3
 Systems of Care Basics
4
A System of Care is …..
  • …A coordinated network of community-based
    services and supports
  • …organized to meet the challenges of children
    with significant emotional, behavioral and mental
    health needs and their families
  • …who have needs across systems (e.g.,
    special education, mental health, child welfare,
    juvenile justice)

5
A System of Care is NOT…..
  • A program

….. but IS
  • A process or philosophy of how care should be
    delivered 
  • A way to assist schools in
  • identifying  intervening
  • developing  sustaining a positive climate to
    promote social emotional well-being reduces
    risk factors

6
Core Values Principles
  • Family-driven and
  • youth guided
  • Culturally and
  • linguistically
  • competent 
  • Community based
  • Natural supports
  • Team based
  • Collaborative
  • Individualized
  • Strength-based
  • Outcome based
  • Persistent 

7
System of Care Framework
8
Systems of Care Use
  • A wraparound process
  • Which is team-based, collaborative, evidence
    based
  • Develops and implements individualized care plans
    for children with complex needs and their
    families
  • Involves multi-level strategies
  • Includes informal supports as well as formal
    services

9
  How Do Students and Schools Benefit from
Systems of Care?
10
How Do Students and Schools Benefit from Systems
of Care
  • Fewer disciplinary problems
  • Improved academic performance 
  • Improved attendance
  • Expanded student services
  • Additional resources for educators
  • Improved coordination and communication 

11
More on Expanded Services
  • Mental health liaison
  • Improved referral protocols
  • Better crisis intervention 
  • Expanded strategies to promote mental health,
    reduce risk factors, enhance protective factors
    provide more intensive services for students with
    more intensive needs
  • Assist school personnel in becoming more
    confident effective in implementing school-wide
    prevention/intervention

12
Why System of Care?
  • Significant model for children with the most
    challenging needs
  • Schools are de facto significant players in the
    System of Care
  • Brings everyone to the table in field where there
    has been historic role confusion
  • Heavily value-laden…and those values work up
    down the continuum
  • Operates at the system level for overall
    improvement, teams more complete, better

13
Broader Approaches
  • Include children youth at risk for behavioral
    health challenges
  • Incorporate values throughout school approaches
  • Incorporate universal mental health promotion
    strategies
  • Reduce risk factors

14
Systems of Care and Education A Case Study in
Success
15
The Problem
YEAR
SUSPENSIONS
EXPULSIONS
2003-04
2911
223
2004-05
2955
227
2005-06
2705
315
2006-07
3088
322
2007-08
3197
395
2008-09
2521
224
16
Disproportionality
  • ECS is disproportionate in TWO areas
  • Over-identification of African American
    students in the mental handicap category
  • 2. Suspension and expulsion of African American
    students

17
Responses
  • 1. Hired 8 1/2 Behavior Consultants
  • 2. Partnered with community mental    
  •     health center Oaklawn - to provide a
  •     mental health liaison now 8 1/2 SOC
  •     Facilitators in schools
  • 3. Contracted with Sandy Washburn of
  •     IU's Center for Education and Lifelong
  •     Learning to develop a plan for
  •     implementation of School-Wide Positive
  •     Behavior Support

18
Challenge...
  • ….increasing schools' capacity to.....
  • Respond effectively, efficiently, and relevantly
    to a range of problem behaviors observed in
    schools
  • Adopt, fit, integrate, and sustain research-based
    behavioral practices
  • Give priority to unified agenda of prevention
  • Engage in team-based problem-solving 

19
Coaching Model
  • Team start-up
  • Team sustainability/accountability
  •        - Technical assistance/problem solving
  •        - Positive reinforcement
  •        - Prompts ("positive nags")
  •        - Celebrations
  • Assure the process and plan integrity
  • Public relations/communications
  • Support network across schools
  • Link between trainers teams
  • Local facilitation
  • Supervision/assistance during application

20
  School Wide Positive Behavior Supports as
Critical Element to System of Care in the
Schools 
21
School Wide Positive Behavior Supports
  • Create environments in which positive behavior
    "works better" than problem behavior
  • Use a data-based problem-solving approach
  • Emphasize prevention, teaching, and reinforcement
  • For ALL students, staff, locations

22
Olweus Bullying Prevention Program
  • We will not bully others.
  • We will help others when they are bullied.
  • We will include everyone.
  • When we know someone is being bullied, we will
    tell an adult at school and at home.

23
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24
Common Elements
  • Identify a common purpose and approach to
    discipline.
  • 2. Define a clear set of positive expectations  
  •      and behaviors.
  • 3. Implement procedures for teaching expected
  •      behaviors.
  • 4. Develop procedures for encouraging expected
  •      behaviors.
  • 5. Develop procedures for discouraging
  •       undesirable behaviors.
  • 6. Implement procedures for on-going
  •      monitoring, evaluation, and modification

25
Tertiary Intensive Individual Interventions Indiv
idual Student Systems Students with
Chronic/Intense Problem Behavior
5
Reduce current cases
SCHOOL-WIDE POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORTS Tiered
Interventions
15
Secondary Targeted Group Interventions Specialize
d Group Systems Students At-Risk for Problem
Behavior
Primary Universal Interventions School-Wide
System Classroom Systems All Students, Staff and
Settings
Reduce new cases
80 of Students
26
PBS Olweus Schools
  • Year Three/Four               Year Two           
      Year One
  • West Side Middle            Beck Elementary    
    North Side Middle
  • Osolo Elementary          Bristol
    Elementary       Central High
  • Woodland Elementary   Feeser Elementary     
    Memorial High
  • Beardsley Elementary  Hawthorne Elementary 
    LIFE/Jr.LIFE -
  • Roosevelt Elementary                              
             Alternative
  • Cleveland Elementary                              
          Middle and High
  •                                                   
               
  •  

27
Systems of Care at Osolo Elementary Our Story
28
Osolo Elementary School
  • Who are we?
  • Enrollment 654
  • Free and Reduced Lunch 73 (75.87 at the end of
    the year)
  • Minority Students
  • 43
  • 26 English Language
  • Learners
  • Cluster Class of
  • students with Emotional
  • Disabilities
  •                                                   
               
  •  

29
Leadership Team Active Coordination
  • FUNCTIONS
  • Implementation support
  • Data-based action plan
  • Coordination
  • Capacity building
  • Policy funding
  • Communications
  • Training capacity
  • Exemplars
  • Evaluation
  • MEMBERS
  • Coordinator
  • Representation
  • Behavioral capacity
  • Agency
  • Leadership
  • Etc

30
ACADEMIC SYSTEMS
BEHAVIORAL SYSTEMS
Child and Family Team Multi-System Involvement
1-5
1-5
Juvenile Justice System
  • Tertiary Interventions
  • Individual Students
  • Assessment-based
  • Intense, durable procedures
  • Tertiary Interventions
  • Individual Students
  • Assessment-based
  • High intensity

Family Services and CAPS Parenting Classes
B.I.T.
Individual Education Plan (IEP)
5-10
G.E.I.
5-10
Special Education Paraprofessionals
  • Secondary Interventions
  • Some students (at risk)
  • Small group interventions
  • Some individualizing

Systems of Care Facilitator
  • Secondary Interventions
  • Some students (at risk)
  • Small group interventions
  • Some individualizing

CARES Tutors
Optimize
Behavior Intervention Plan
Behavior Specialist
Individual Learning Plans (ILPs)
Library Homework Help
80-90
Flexible grouping (Data Teams)
80-90
School Social Worker
  • Universal Interventions
  • All students
  • Preventative, proactive
  • Universal Interventions
  • All settings, all students
  • Preventative, proactive

Boys and Girls Club Power Hour
School Nurse
Primetime Paraprofessionals
Full Day Kindergarten
Effective Teaching Strategies
School-Wide Positive Behavior Support
Indiana Academic Standards
31
How Has Osolo Benefited from System of Care?
32
Osolo Outcomes
  • Fewer discipline problems
  • Reduction in referrals
  • 06-07 3.67 07-08 2.84 08-09 2.7
  •      Comments from visitors
  • Improved academic performance
  •      7.6 improvement ISTEP (Exemplary
    Progress)-     (from Fall 2008 test)              
              
  •      Improvement in all grades in Spring 2009    
  •  Improved attendance
  •       Continued excellent overall (95)
  •       Improved for specific students
  • Expanded student services
  •  Additional resources
  •  Improved communication and coordination
  •                                                   
               
  •  

33
Partners in Success
Social Worker 
Behavior Consultant Oaklawn
Systems of Care Facilitator
Samaritan Center
Community Agencies Case Workers
YMCA Personnel
Psychologist
Probation Counselors
Doctors Grandparents
Parents
Friends
Siblings Aunts/ Uncles
Teachers
Principals School Staff
Central Office    Department of Child
Services 
The Child
34
How Do We Find These Students?
35
PBS Office Managed Data
  • OSOLO…Better…Focused…Team Work
  •                                                   
               
  •  

36
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37
Questions We Ask About the Data
38
The Big Five
  • Monthly PBS Meetings 
  • 1. Do we have a problem?
  • 2. What? Behavior (Referrals)
  • 3. Where?  Location
  • 4. When? Time
  • 5. Who? By student
  • The Big Five verifies if universal system is
    working.

39
UNIVERSAL SYSTEM
PBS IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS AT OSOLO
  • Using Data to Work for Staff and Kids

40
HOW DID OSOLO DO IT?
  • Year One        
  • Training for Leadership Team
  • Developed Plan Based on Data
  • Looked at Systems and their impact on Student
    Behavior
  • Year Two        
  • Implemented the Plan
  • 2-day Staff Retreat with Sandy Washburn
  • 3 days of Instruction with Scripted Lesson Plans
  • Monthly PBS Leadership Team Meetings
  • Weekly Behavior Team Meetings
  • Monthly New Student Meetings

41
HOW DID OSOLO DO IT?
  • Year Three        
  • 3 days of Instruction with Scripted Lesson Plans
  • Monthly PBS Leadership Team Meetings
  • Weekly Behavior Team Meetings
  • Weekly New Student Meetings
  • Training for Sub Committee on Secondary
    Interventions
  •  Year Four        
  • Implemented the Plan
  • 2-day Staff Retreat with Sandy Washburn
  • 3 days of Instruction with Scripted Lesson Plans
  • Monthly PBS Leadership Team Meetings
  • Weekly Behavior Team Meetings
  • Monthly New Student Meetings

42
School-Wide Expectations
  • Be Respectful of Self, Others, and Property
  •  
  • Be Responsible and Prepared at All Times
  •  
  • Be Results Oriented.  Begin with the end in
    mind. Stephen Covey      
  •  

43
Cafeteria
Arrival/Dismissal
Restroom
Respect
  • Use level 0 voices until seated
  • Use level 2 while eating
  • Stay seated
  • Touch and eat only your food
  • Follow directions of all staff
  • Keep hands and feet to self
  • - Remove hats
  • Keep hands, feet and belongings to yourself
  • Follow directions of all staff
  • Use level 1 voices
  • Honor the privacy of others
  • Take turns
  • Take care of bathroom property
  • - Follow directions of all staff

Responsi- bility
  • Handle food items appropriately
  • Dispose of trash and liquids appropriately
  • Use level 0 voice when lights are off, overhead
    announcements, and dismissal
  • Be in alphabetical order
  • Give smaller children the right-of-way
  • Go directly to your assigned location.
  • Put away all your things
  • Take everything you need for the day with you
    into the class
  • Flush the toilet
  • Wash hands with soap
  • Turn off the faucet
  • Keep the bathroom clean

Results Oriented
  • Prepare for the potential for sudden changes in
    voice levels by
  • A. Always keep an adult in your vision
  • B. Communicate with others in a quiet way during
    level changes

- Consider the positive and negative outcome of
your actions - Think about people or locations
you should avoid that might cause problems
  • - Consider the positive and negative outcome of
    your actions
  • Think about people or locations you should avoid
    that might cause problems
  • Keep your time as short as possible

Outcomes
  • Clean cafeteria
  • Calm atmosphere
  • Food received quickly and orderly
  • A safe environment

- Safe school - Ready to learn - Orderly and
respectful environment
  • Clean and safe bathrooms
  • Healthier environment
  • Quick and timely

Adult Expectations
  • Escort class to lunchroom
  • Redirect/Model appropriate voice levels (0-2)
  • Practice active supervision (scan the room, move
    around, )
  • Acknowledge students who meet expectations
  • Redirect ANY AND ALL students Be respectful, be
    brief, tell them exactly what to do
  • Direct students to dispose of trash/liquids
    appropriately
  • Dismiss students by tables to line up
  • Greet students at your post from 800 815
  • Remind students to walk
  • Redirect students to keep hands and feet to self
  • Acknowledge students who meet expectations
  • Consider having bell work assignments daily
  • Dismissal
  • - Be at your door during dismissal
  • - Prepare students to be dismissed
  • - Remind students of dismissal procedures,
    particularly problems
  • Acknowledge students who meet expectations
  • Develop clear procedures
  • Remind students to use equipment properly.
  • Remind students to and follow safety and
    cleanliness guidelines.
  • Actively supervise restrooms.
  • Encourage a time limit.
  • Periodically check condition of restroom after
    class finishes.
  • Provide feedback to students and to other staff
    regarding use of restroom.
  • Acknowledge students who follow the expectations.

44
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45
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46
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47
Lesson Station   Hallway Traveling Taught by 
School Social Worker
48
Lesson Station   Hallway Arrival Taught by  Art
Teacher
49
Lesson Station   Playground Taught by  System
of Care Facilitator
50
How Do We Use Data to Work for Kids?
51
Student
Total Referrals
Location
Student A
7
6 Bus 1 Letter of Concern
Student B
5
2 Bus
Student C
5
All School
Student D
4
4 Bus
Student E
4
3 Bus
Student F
4
3 Bus 1 Attendance
Student G
3
2 Lice 1 Letter of Concern
Student H
3
3 Bus
Student I
3
3 Bus
Student J
3
3 Lice
Student K
3
All Bus
Student L
3
All School
Student M
3
2 Bus 1 School
Student N
3
2 Bus
Student O
3
2 Bus
Student P
3
All School
52
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53
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54
Data By Student
55
Osolo's Successful Case Studies
  • R.Doe  1st Grade -Multiple Behaviors
  •  
  • Behavior History from Previous school 
  • September 24,2008-November 11, 2008
  • 14 absences
  • 5 suspensions
  • No established reading level due to behavior
  •  
  • Behavior History Osolo  (PBS/SOC)
  • December 2008 -May 2009
  • No absences
  • 1 suspension
  • Reading Level was established
  •  

56
Osolo's Successful Case Studies
  • K. Doe  6th Grade- Physical Fighting
  • 1. Previous school 
  •  1/4/05- 1/17/06
  •  7 out of 13 referrals were suspensions
  •  
  • 2.  Osolo (PBS/SOC)
  • 1/18/06-3/08 
  • 4 referrals
  •  
  • 3.  Previous School
  • 3/27/08-9/08
  • 12 referrals
  •  
  • 4.  Alternative School
  • 10/08
  • Expulsion
  • Homebound
  •  
  •  
  • System of Care involvement to establish
    transition plan
  •  
  •  
  • 5.  Osolo (PBS/SOC)
  • 1/12/09
  • 1/2 days to full-time
  • 2 school suspensions

57
Integrating PBS with System of Care
  • Children who do not respond to Tier 1 or
  • Tier 2 approaches need additional intervention
  • This more than likely will involve System of Care
    facilitation 
  •  
  • Will also likely utilize linkage and referral to
    the broader mental health system

58
  • Systems of Care Facilitator
  • ROLE
  • Responsible for providing hands-on assistance to
    students with potential mental health, emotional
    or behavioral challenges and their families
    within the Elkhart Community Schools (Students
    needing Tier 3 interventions)
  • Oaklawn is a community mental health agency that
    provides ongoing weekly supervision with 2
    Licensed Clinical Social Workers and a weekly
    staffing with a Board Certified Child and
    Adolescent Psychiatrist
  • Complete immersion in the school culture while
    providing expertise in mental health needs

59
  • Systems of Care Facilitator
  • ROLE Continued
  • Referrals Each school has an identified process
    in which students needing Tier 3 interventions
    are identified and referred to System of Care.
    This weekly process has the SOC Facilitator,
    Behavior Specialist, Social Worker, Principal
    and/or Vice Principal in attendance
  • Once identified, school administrators contact
    the family to ensure the family desires
    participation

60
  • Facilitator Responsibilities
  • CANS (Child and Adolescent Needs and Strengths
    Assessment)
  • Assist families with referrals to mental health
    agencies or broader community services
  • Act as liaison to provide coordination with all
    services in which the student is involved
    (juvenile justice, child welfare, chemical
    dependency)
  • Help reintegrate students into school from any
    type of outside service (intensive outpatient
    programs, residential or juvenile justice
    placement)

61
  • Child and Family Team Meetings
  • Team consists of both informal and formal
    supports
  • Strengths-based, family focused approach to care
  • Family vision creates goals
  • Unconditional "People don't fail, plans do."

62
  • Challenges/Next Steps
  • Keeping a Common Vision Expanding to Others
  • Continue to Align Systems for Efficiency of
    Services Expand to Others
  • SOC Training and Education to Get Systems Truly
    Integrated
  • Add Site Resources
  • Life Domains and Holistic Approach
  • ……and……
  •  

63
  • Challenges/Next Steps 2
  • Data Management/Record Keeping A District
    Challenge
  • Coordinate with County-Wide Mental Health
    Integration Grant
  • Expand Parent Involvement Cultural Competency
    Inititives
  •  

64
  • Teamwork
  • Coming together is a beginning.
  • Keeping together is progress.
  • Working together is success.
  • -Henry Ford

65
  • Resources
  • Center for School Mental Health and Action,
    Education and Systems-of-Care Approaches
    Solutions for Educators and School Mental Health
    Professionals, May, 2007 
  • Kutash, Krista, Albert J. Duchnowski Nancy
    Lynn, School-Based Mental Health, April 2006 
  • Stroul, Beth Gary Blau, The System of Care
    Handbook, 2008  
  • OSEP Technical Assistance Center on PBIS
    www.pbis.org
  • Association for PBS www.apbs.org
  • Florida's Positive Behavior Support Project at
    University of South Florida www.flpbs.fmhi.usf.ed
    u

66
  • Resources (contd)
  • Maryland www.pbismaryland.org
  • Michigan www.bridges4kids.org
  • www.stopbullyingnow.hrsa.gov 
  • www.clemson.edu/olweus 
  • www.stopbullyingworld.org 

67
  • Thank You!
  • "Alone we can do so little together we can do so
    much." Helen Keller

68
  • Presenters
  • Mary Jo Sartorius, Director of Special Education,
    Elkhart Community Schools, msartorius_at_elkhart.k12.
    in.us
  • Bonnie Raine, Coordinator, Elkhart County System
    of Care, bonita.raine_at_oaklawn.org
  • Debra Beehler, Coordinator - Behavior Supports,
    Elkhart Community Schools, Student Services,
    dbeehler_at_elkhart.k12.in.us
  • Jean Creasbaum, Principal, Osolo School,
    jcreasbaum_at_elkhart.k12.in.us
  • Amy Spurgeon, System of Care Team Leader,
    amy.spurgeon_at_oaklawn.org
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