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BRANDING A VEHICLE FOR COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE Richard Gilbert, Ph.D., H.E., OIA American University of Health Science

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... between teaching & research ... Possibility of creating a market niche for a higher value, ... cinema, cafes, live music, music festivals, quality of retail ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: BRANDING A VEHICLE FOR COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE Richard Gilbert, Ph.D., H.E., OIA American University of Health Science


1
BRANDING A VEHICLE FOR COMPETITIVE
ADVANTAGERichard Gilbert, Ph.D., H.E.,
OIAAmerican University of Health Science
2
  • Brands are all about trust
  • The reason consumers flock to some brands and
    ignore others is that behind the brand stands an
    unspoken promise of value.
  • That is why brands are becoming even more
    important drivers of growth.

3
  • Brand is an experience
  • A brand is essentially a container for a
    custumers complete experience with the offer and
    the company.
  • (Sergio Zyman)

4
What is a Brand?
User
Culture
Personality
Attributes
Benefits
Values
5
The Brand as an Open System.
Chanels, contacts
Corporation Economy
Relationships with customers
Competition
Organizations associations
Personality
.Scope .Attributes .Uses .Quality/ Value .Function
al Benefits
Codes/Tone
Skills
(Core) Offer (Tangible Products Services)
Symbols
Origin
User Imagery
Self-expressive benefits
Name
Tribes Cultures Groups
Emotional benefits
6
  • This Brand System interacts AS ...
  • 1) .. A SOCIO-ECONOMIC AGENT
  • 2) .. A CORPORATE ASSET
  • 3) .. A STRATEGIC MARKETING TOOL
  • 4) .. A COMMUNICATION SELLING AGENT

7
  • THE BRAND AS A SOCIO-ECONOMIC AGENT
  • PART OF EACH INDIVIDUALS AND SOCIETAL
    GROUPS  SET OF REFERENCES
  • A POWERFUL SOCIAL DRIVER
  • A GLOBAL CEMENT
  • A VALUE ADDING ECONOMIC AGENT

8
Brand Strategic Role
Brand Equity
Cash flow booster
Consumer Response Booster
9
  • THE BRAND AS A CORPORATE ASSET
  • A PROTECTED PROPERTY (owner's right to use)
  • BOOK VALUE, GOODWILL. - ASSET that can be sold
    and bought
  • MARKETING  NON TANGIBLE  ASSET precisely
    measurable and valuable (when brand is on sale)
  • STRENGTH , LEADERSHIP EQUITY, ie capacity to
    justify price.

10
YR s  Brandasset Valuator  PowerGrid
11
(No Transcript)
12
Building Brand Equity
Perceived Quality
Brand Associations
Preference
Name Awareness
Other Brand Assets
Brand Equity (Name Symbol)
Brand Loyalty
  • Value To Firm
  • Helps Programs
  • Brand Loyalty
  • Prices
  • Brand Extensions
  • Trade Leverage
  • Competitive
  • Advantage
  • Value To Customer
  • Info Processing
  • Confidence in Buying
  • Use Satisfaction

13
  • THE BRAND AS A COMMUNICATION
  • SELLING AGENT
  • A RELATIONSHIP ACTOR/BUILDER
  • AN INFLUENCER
  • IT GIVES MEANINGS TO PRODUCTS/SERVICES ...
  • ... AND A CREATOR OF  NEW  WORLDS

14
A modern brand is
  • A  persona  that overlays and includes the
    physical products/services
  • the sum of fundamental values and attributes
    ascribed to it by people
  • the entity that the consumers construct from the
    products meanings, symbols and images that they
    perceive as defining the brand.

15
From Traditional to Experiential Branding
  • From
  • Brands as identifiers
  • Names, logos, slogans build awareness and image
  • TO
  • Brands as experience providers
  • Names, logos, slogans, events, customer contacts
    which build sensory, affective, creative
    relations and ways of being (lifestyles) with the
    brands

16
Implications on Higher Education
17
  • New Demands on Higher Education
  • Changing landscape of competition in HE
  • Two university models Do-it-All versus
  • Do-it Different Well
  • Branding as a vehicle for competitive niche
    marketing.

18
THE CHANGING LANDSCAPE OF COMPETITION IN HIGHER
EDUCATION (many countries)
BEFORE HE SECTOR nationally organised
regulated Funding centralized Competition
limited structured e.g. polytechnics versus
universities National (do-it-all) model for
the university sector vis-à-vis job spec., pay
scales, nominal standards, pension schemes,
balance teaching/research
19
THE CHANGING LANDSCAPE OF COMPETITION IN HIGHER
EDUCATION
EMERGING (DIRECTION) Competition
increasing National (new universities), Europe,
Anglophone international (USA, Canada,
Australia, India?) Pressures towards
diversification of funding regimes Competition
within many countries less structured/less
limited e.g. new universities, RAE, Russell
Group, internationalization of Oxbridge LSE,
Bifurcation between teaching research
National models under pressure (pay
differentials, limited term teaching
contracts, international headhunting,
overseas students
20
THE CHANGING LANDSCAPE OF COMPETITION IN HIGHER
EDUCATION
  • CHARACTERIZATION
  • Place versus space plight of cities in a global
    economy
  • Place bound cities cant move and follow mobile
    capital
  • IMPERATIVE
  • To divert capital flows through particular cities
  • To embed economic activity
  • To develop economic activity less vulnerable to
    the vagaries of capital flight

21
CHANGING COMPETITION IN HIGHER EDUCATION
  • Implications for urban economic strategy?
  • Higher value-added activities less vulnerable
  • Headquarter RD functions less prone to
    relocation
  • LESSON
  • Do not produce high-volume, low value products.
  • Go for higher value, lower volume knowledge
    intensive,
  • products.

22
CHANGING COMPETITION IN HIGHER EDUCATION
  • Implications for urban economic strategy?
  • Importance of place-branding and place-marketing
  • image /liveability
  • Imperative
  • Need to attract mobile, metropolitan middle
    classes
  • Importance of good living environment, good food,
    good schools, liberal metropolitan activities and
    values

23
CHANGING COMPETITION IN HIGHER EDUCATION
  • HOW DOES THIS APPLY TO UNIVERSITIES?
  • Place-bound communities (like cities)
  • Need to divert capital embed economic activity

24
CHANGING COMPETITION IN HIGHER EDUCATION
  • What kinds of capital?
  • HUMAN CAPITAL
  • Better undergraduate students
  • Better post-graduate students
  • More international students
  • Better academic staff

25
CHANGING COMPETITION IN HIGHER EDUCATION
  • What kinds of capital?
  • FINANCE CAPITAL
  • Capital investment (block funding, private
    sector)
  • Discretionary research funding (research
    councils)
  • Ancillary revenue streams
  • Short courses,
  • Commercial management of estates
  • Commercial management of other assets
    merchandising?
  • IPR/patenting/commercialisation of research
  • Private benefactors (alumni schemes etc)

26
CHANGING COMPETITION IN HIGHER EDUCATION
  • Key strategic problem
  • How to divert flows and attract these different
    forms of capital?
  • Solution
  • SENSE OF PLACE /COMMUNITY
  • (PLACE-MARKETING, IMAGE, LIVEABILITY,
    AUTHENTICITY)
  • HIGHER VALUE-ADDED NICHE PRODUCT, LESS VULNERABLE
  • TO COMPETITIVE PRESSURES.
  • Do something other universities dont and
    preferably can not do.
  • Do-it-Different and
    Do-it-Well

27
CAMPUS MICRO-ECONOMY AS NODAL LEVER FOR ACCESSING
WIDER NATIONAL GLOBAL CAPITAL FLOWS
  • FINANCE CAPITAL
  • Capital investment
  • Research funding
  • Benefactors
  • Ancillary revenue streams
  • HUMAN CAPITAL
  • World class staff
  • Students

CAMPUS ECONOMY COMMUNITY
BRAND
CURRICULUM
RESEARCH
LOCATION LANDSCAPE
28
TWO MODELS DO-It-ALL or DO-it-Different and
Do-it-Well
  • The traditional model Do-it-All Universities
  • Renaissance man
  • Enlightenment universalism
  • Shared perception of a proper university
  • Full suite of science and humanities
    departments
  • Commitment to uneconomic, high prestige
    subjects
  • (philosophy, classics , chemistry)
  • Medical school
  • Highly centralised regulation and financing
  • From polytechnics to new universities A rush to
    join the high table

29
DO-It-ALL or DO-it-Different and Do-it-Well
  • The traditional model Do-it-All Universities
  • ACHIEVEMENTS
  • British Education as international
    brand/benchmark
  • Standardized level of provision and quality

30
DO-it-Different Do-it-Well
  • American universities never like this.
  • Expansion of mass higher education globalizing
    competition brings new pressures for market
    differentiation

31
  • Do-it-Different Do-it-Well
  • Small always struggled to do it all
  • Traded on difference (e.g. Agricultural vs.
    Business)

32
  • Do-it-Different Do-it-Well
  • Vulnerability
  • Small campus university, rural location.
  • Too small to compete head-to-head
  • Lacks large urban home market
  • Increasing competition from new universities
  • Lacks access to exciting metropolitan life
  • DANGER
  • Being pushed down, pushed mainstream

33
  • Do-it-Different Do-it-Well
  • Opportunity
  • Already primed by history tradition location
    for Do-it-Different Well
  • Possibility of creating a market niche for a
    higher value, low volume,
  • and more locally embedded product.
  • Possibility of deciding how and against which
    institutions to compete
  • (or better still side-step competition)
  • RESPONSE
  • Aggressive concerted niche marketing and
    lateral competition

34
BRANDING A VEHICLE FOR COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE
  • Framework tying together
  • Place-marketing liveability
  • Higher value added product
  • Specifically
  • Research
  • Teaching
  • Physical infrastructure and operations
  • Sense of place community

35
BRANDING A VEHICLE FOR COMPETITION ADVANTAGE
A Interdisciplinary research focus B
Interdisciplinary focus on teaching, including
innovative links with NGOs and industry. C
Liveability and sense of place (e.g.
cinema, cafes, live music, music
festivals, quality of retail outlets,
second hand bookshop etc) D Architecture,
localisation of food, energy, and material
inputs
36
BRANDING A VEHICLE FOR COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE
Interdisciplinary research
37
BRANDING A VEHICLE FOR COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE
Interdisciplinary research Teaching
Collegiality, learning culture, participation,
engagement
38
  • Campus community and social life
  • Liveabilty food culture, book shops, cinema,
    small bars, deli., farmers market,
  • Economy Keep the money on campus

39
Campus community and social life Economy Keep
the money on campus short courses, training
40
Thank You
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