Curriculum Architecture for Literacy in the Early Stages of Primary - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Curriculum Architecture for Literacy in the Early Stages of Primary PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: 154298-MDU4N



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Curriculum Architecture for Literacy in the Early Stages of Primary

Description:

A range of comparison schools' were selected to allow formal evaluation and ... The schools, whether pilot or comparison schools, were matched for economic status. ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:49
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 23
Provided by: ltscotl
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Curriculum Architecture for Literacy in the Early Stages of Primary


1
Curriculum Architecture for Literacy in the Early
Stages of Primary
  • Literacy Pilot
  • North Lanarkshire Council
  • Learning Leisure Services

2
Overall Aims
  • The Primary One Literacy Programme has been
    designed to provide
  • A clear structure for the development of literacy
    skills.
  • A progressive programme for the teaching of
    phonics.
  • Guidance on the teaching of reading and the
    development of comprehension skills.
  • Guidance on the teaching of daily writing as well
    as the taught experiential writing lesson while
    promoting writing across the curriculum.
  • Guidance on the teaching of spelling dictation.
  • Suggestions on the minimum time allocations for
    the promotion of literacy skills across the
    curriculum as well as in English Language.
  • Active learning linked to purposeful play.
  • Development opportunities to staff increase staff
    confidence in the delivery of literacy across the
    curriculum making cross curricular links

3
Desired Outcomes
  • The primary One Literacy Programme has been
    designed to ensure that
  • Childrens attainment in literacy will be
    improved
  • Children will acquire the necessary literacy
    skills and confidence to develop their full
    potential and the four capacities of ACfE will be
    developed in every child.
  • Teachers will be confident and competent in using
    their skills in the teaching of literacy and more
    able to identify cross curricular opportunities
    and integration of literacy skills.
  • Children will be more independent in their
    learning and will be able to work and talk
    collaboratively whilst reflecting their own
    targets / learning outcomes.
  • Childrens experiences of acquiring skills in
    literacy will not be developed via worksheets and
    workbooks but rather as a result of exposure to
    purposeful, meaningful, active and relevant
    learning contexts.

4
The Process 1
  • In year one, a total of ten schools were involved
    in developing the literacy programme and design
    of the support materials for the primary one
    class.
  • In year two the second phase included a further
    forty schools.
  • Pilot schools were schools who had expressed an
    interest and a desire to review their own
    practice in the light of A Curriculum for
    Excellence (ACfE).

5
The Process 2
  • A range of comparison schools were selected to
    allow formal evaluation and assessment of the
    impact of the project at the end of a two year
    period.
  • The schools, whether pilot or comparison schools,
    were matched for economic status.

6
Content of the Programme
  • The programme has been structured under nine main
  • sections as follows
  • Daily / weekly planning and Forward Plans.
  • Teaching of phonics, comprehension and guided
    reading.
  • The taught experiential writing lesson daily
    cross curricular writing.
  • Partner spelling and dictation.
  • Integrated story telling and Talking Listening.
  • Using the classroom and outdoor environments.
  • Developing literacy through play the early
    years experience
  • Ideas for successful transition ( Nursery to
    Primary )
  • Additional support Needs (ASN).

7
Section 1 Support Materials
  • Daily / Weekly Planning
  • This section provides
  • The Primary One Language Planner for days one to
    five.
  • Exemplar Early Literacy Task Boards.
  • Comprehensive Planning and Evaluation formats
    for
  • Reading
  • Writing
  • Talking Listening

8
Section 2 Support Materials
  • Teaching of phonics, comprehension and guided
    reading.
  • This section provides
  • The Primary One Phonics Programme.
  • Guidance on the development of Comprehension
    Skills.
  • Guided Reading Stages.
  • Guided Reading Lessons ( Yellow Pink)

9
Section 3 Support Materials
  • The taught experiential writing lesson and daily
    cross curricular writing.
  • This section provides
  • Guidance on delivery of the taught lesson.
  • A guide to organising Active Literacy.
  • Literacy foldouts.
  • Word mats.
  • Reading to Write Activities
  • Shape / Strip books
  • Beginning, Middle End.
  • Zig- zag Books.
  • This section also contains photographic evidence
    of the materials in use.

10
Section 4 Support Materials
  • Partner Spelling and Dictation
  • This section provides
  • Guidance on general spelling methodology
  • Lists of common words
  • Desired outcomes
  • Four suggested activities
  • Exemplar Clip on spelling mats

11
Section 5 Support Materials
  • Integrated Story Telling and
  • Talking Listening
  • This section provides
  • An overview of the use of traditional tales,
    stories and folk tales in developing listening
    talking capability, story / text skills as well
    as comprehension strategies.
  • Exemplar lessons using two well known Traditional
    Tales as the stimulus.
  • Suggestions for extension activities.

12
Section 6 Support Materials
  • Using the Classroom and the Outdoor Environment
  • This section provides
  • Guidance on developing a literate rich classroom
    environment.
  • Rationale and general principles for promoting
    literacy out of doors.
  • Reference resources for the implementation of
    outdoor activities and experiences.

13
Section 7 Support Materials
  • Links with Play
  • This section provides
  • A General Overview of Literacy through Play.
  • and guidance on
  • Developing Literacy through Imaginative Play.
  • Cross Curricular Links to Literacy through
    Imaginative Play.
  • Developing Literacy in the Outdoor Environment.

14
Section 8 Support Materials
  • Additional Support Needs (A.S.N. )
  • Materials for this section will be prepared
    during session 2007 2008.

15
Project Evaluation
  • The project was evaluated using
  • Standardised reading assessment
  • Teacher questionnaire
  • Focus groups

16
Project Evaluationfrom class teacher interviews
/ focus groups
  • Comment from class teachers who have been
    involved in delivering the
  • programme and in trialling of the materials
    March 2007
  • In joining the project, we did not realise the
    impact that Active Literacy would
  • have both on ourselves and the children. This
    holistic way of teaching literacy
  • has engaged the childrens interest through a
    multi-sensory approach. Children
  • are keen to participate in activities, especially
    the boys. The childrens attitude
  • to reading and writing has been changed
    dramatically by this enjoyable
  • approach to teaching.
  • We have enjoyed the opportunity to try new
    resources, to compare the
  • results and to share ideas with our colleagues in
    the group.
  • We believe the childrens active involvement in
    their learning encourages them to be
  • more independent, confident and co-operative.
  • We have all recognised that attainment levels
    have improved and childrens attitudes
  • have changed through the development of Active
    Literacy in our schools.
  • The project has brought back success and fun for
    both the staff and the children.

17
Implications
  • Qualitative Evidence of the Projects Impact on
    Learning Teaching and Attainment
  • The average reading age of the P.2 children in
    the experimental group is 5 months higher than
    the average reading age of the P.2 control
    children who did not receive the intervention
  • This result is significantly significant (T
    3.309, DF 102 p lt 0.005 one tailed)

18
Implications
19
Conclusion
  • The project has raised attainment in reading.
  • The project has begun to redress the effects of
    poverty on attainment in literacy.

20
Future Literacy Developments
  • Staff development through roll out of the
    programme for
  • Senior managers in schools
  • Early years staff
  • Classroom assistants
  • Early years workers / nursery nurses

21
Future Developments contd.
  • Taking the project into Primaries 2 3.
  • Build on the projects success in address
    disadvantage and its negative effect on learning.
  • Further develop integrated play through
    storylines and cross curricular activities while
    supporting pupil choice.
  • Integrated literacy work from P4 P7.
  • Continue to evaluate the project through
    multi-agency working.
  • Future research to evaluate the impact of teacher
    behaviour, pupil behaviour and classroom
    organisation on learning and attainment

22
Resources
  • Active Literacy for Early Stages Primary
    North Lanarkshire Council Publication
    date July 2007.
  • Traditional Tales.
  • Cross Curricular Themes.
About PowerShow.com