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eLearning: The Big Picture'

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Title: eLearning: The Big Picture'


1
eLearning The Big Picture.
Prof.Dr. Srisakdi Charmonman Chief Executive
Officer College of Internet Distance
Education Assumption University of Thailand
charm_at_ksc.au.edu
www.charm.au.edu
Keynote address, Training for Executives of Hanoi
Open University eLearning Methodology Process
and Management Training, Srisakdi Charmonman IT
Center, Assumption University Bangna Campus,
June 4-8, 2007
1
2
eLearning The Big Picture.
  • Introduction. 2. Five Generations of
    Distance Education.
  • Sloan Foundation eLearning Report 2005.
  • Sloan Foundation eLearning Report 2006.
  • Sample eLearning Laws.
  • Case Study at Assumption University.

2
3
eLearning The Big Picture (Cont.)
7. Sample eLearning Policies. 8. Concluding
Remarks.
3
4
1. Introduction.
  • Online education or eLearning is gaining more
    and more popularity all over the world.
  • University level no field of study where
    eLearning is not used.
  • Short courses and training level formal
    academic institutions, learned societies and
    companies are providing eLearning.

4
5
Introduction (Cont.)
K12 State of Michigan passed the first law in
the world requiring eLearning
in high schools. 450,000 students to
take eLearning. Other states may pass
similar law.
5
6
Introduction (Cont.)
  • Time Magazine By the year 2020, eLearning
    will be the mainstream and classroom learning
    the supporting part.
  • All countries have established or are in
    the process of establishing eLearning
    programs.

6
7
Introduction (Cont.)
  • In the year 1999, Jones International
    University became the first virtual university
    to be fully accredited.
  • The University of Phoenix is the university
    to have the highest net profit. In 2005,
    Phoenix revenue was 2.251 US billion and
    net profit of 444 US million (about 17,000
    million baht).
  • Capella University is the first virtual
    university to enter Nasdaq.

7
8
Introduction (Cont.)
  • On 25 April 2002, the Board of Trustees of
    Assumption University approved the proposal
    by the author to establish the College
    of Internet Distance Education (CIDE) with
    the author as Chairman of the Board and
    Chief Executive Officer (CEO).

8
9
Introduction (Cont.)
  • The College is located at Srisakdi Charmonman
    IT Center with 12 floors, 12,000 square
    meters, and about 15 US million.
  • As of May 2006, CIDE of AU offers - MS in
    Management. - MS in Information and
    Communication Technology. - Ph.D. in
    eLearning Methodology.

9
10
Searching Google for Ph.D. in eLearning
Methodology
10
11
Searching Google for Ph.D. in eLearning
Methodology
  • Found 7 entries on the first page about
    Assumption University Ph.D. in eLearning
    Methodology.
  • AU Ph.D. in eLearning Methodology is the
    first and only such Ph.D. in the world.

11
12
Introduction (Cont.)
  • To promote eLearning in Thailand, the
    author includes the subject in his one-hour
    radio and TV programs - FM 92.5 and AM 891
    every Tuesday 10.10 11.00am. - AM 819
    every Monday 2.10 3.00pm. - UBC 89 TV every
    Sunday 12.00 noon 1.00pm.

12
13
Introduction (Cont.)
  • July 2006,
  • the International Biographical Centre
  • in Cambridge, England named
  • Prof.Dr. Srisakdi Charmonman
  • The Father of Thai E-Learning

13
14
The Father of Thai E-Learning by the
International Biographical Centre.
14
15
Searching for e-Learning provides
224,000,000 entries
15
16
About 450 Million Internet Hosts in the
Year 2007
16
17
World Internet Usage and Population
Statistics.
17
18
World Internet Usage.
  • Over 1 billion Internet users, 16 of
    world population.
  • Largest penetration rate of 68.6 in North
    America, 227 million users from 331 millions
    population.
  • Largest number of Internet users is in Asia,
    380 million users from 3.6 billion population,
    (but only 10.6 of the population which is
    far less than 68.6 in North America.)

18
19
1.1 Definitions of eLearning by Sloan.
  • There are many definitions of eLearning.
  • Searching for define elearning from Google,
    four sources were founded.

19
20
Searching for define elearning from Google,
four sources
20
21
Definitions of eLearning by Sloan. (Cont.)
  • From lten.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eleaarninggt,
    E-learning most often means an approach to
    facilitate and enhance learning through the use
    of devices based on computer and communications
    technology

21
22
Definitions of eLearning by Sloan. (Cont.)
  • From the web ltwww.conferzone.com/resource /glossar
    yop.htmlgt, Online Learning is the same as
    eLearning.
  • From the web ltwww.intelera.com/glossary.htmlgt,
    Online Learning has the same meaning as
    eLearning.

22
23
Definitions of eLearning by Sloan. (Cont.)
  • Another important definition of eLearning was
    given in the report by Sloan Consortium Growing
    by Degrees
  • Online Education the United States, 2005
  • released in November 2005. Four types of
    learning.
  • 1) Traditional Learning.
  • 2) Web Facilitated Learning.
  • 3) Blended/Hybrid Learning.
  • 4) Online Learning or eLearning.

23
24
Four Types of Distance Education.
24
25
Four Types of Distance Education.
1) Traditional Learning 0 Online Course
with no online technology used. Content is
delivered in writing or orally.
25
26
Four Types of Distance Education (Cont.)
2) Web Facilitated Learning 1 - 29 Online
Course which uses web-based technology to
facilitate what is essentially a face-to-face
course. Uses a course management system
(CMS) or web pages to post the syllabus
and assignments.
26
27
Four Types of Distance Education (Cont.)

3) Blended/ Hybrid Learning 30 to 79 Online
Course that blends online and face-to-face
delivery. Substantial proportion
of the content is delivered online.
Typically uses online discussions, and
typically has some face-to-face meetings.
27
28
Four Types of Distance Education (Cont.)
4) Online or eLearning 80 - 100Online A
course where most of all of the content is
delivered online. Typically have no
face-to-face meetings in the traditional
sense (May use webcam or VDO conference ).

28
29
1.2 U.S Universities with eLearning Degrees.
  • The university with the largest number
    of eLearning students is Phoenix with more
    than 140,000 students.
  • Phoenix made about 150 US million net
    profit per year.
  • Baker College has the second largest
    enrollment of about 101,000 students.

29
30
Sample U. S. Universities Offering eLearning
Courses.
30
31
Searching for US Universities eLearning
Statistics
31
32
US Universities with eLearning Programs
32
33
2. Five Generations of Distance Education.
  • First generation The Correspondence Model
  • Second generation The Multimedia Model
  • Third generation The Telelearning Model
  • Fourth Generation The Web-based Learning
    Model
  • Fifth Generation The Internet Distance
    Education Model

33
34
First Generations of Distance Education.
  • First Generation
  • The Correspondence
    Model
  • Print
  • Poster mail

34
35
The First Generations of Distance Education
(Cont.)
  • The first generation
  • Started in the late 1800s and early 1900s
  • Was known as correspondence study using postal
    mail.
  • The students and instructors communicated through
    writing and postal mail.

35
36
The First Generations of Distance Education
(Cont.)
  • In the early 1900s
  • Baltimores Calvert School was the first
    elementary school to offer correspondence study.
  • University of Chicago was the first university
    to offer correspondence study.

36
37
The First Generations of Distance Education
(Cont.)
  • As a matter of fact, correspondence study can be
    offered through the Internet by using email
    instead of the postal mail which is referred to
    as snail mail to indicate its slow speed
    comparing to the Internet.

37
38
The Second Generations of Distance Education.
  • Second Generation
  • The
    Multimedia Model
  • Print
  • Audiotape
  • Videotape
  • Computer-based learning, e.g. - CML
    (Computer-Managed Learning) - CAL
    (Computer-Assisted Learning)
  • Interactive video (disk and tape)

38
39
The Second Generations of Distance Education
(Cont.)
  • The second generation
  • Is called the Open Universities which started
    in 1970s.
  • The British Open University delivered the course
    information via radio and television.
  • The philosophy of anyone, anytime, anywhere was
    adopted by open universities.

39
40
The Second Generations of Distance Education
(Cont.)
  • Any person may enroll in courses without regard
    to prior experience or education.
  • A student can begin and complete a course without
    time restrictions.
  • Coursework and study is done anywhere the student
    chooses.

40
41
Third Generations of Distance Education.
  • Third Generation
  • The
    Telelearning Model
  • Audioteleconferencing
  • Videoconferencing
  • Audiographic Communication
  • Broadcast TV/Radio and Audioteleconferencin
    g

41
42
Third Generations of Distance Education (Cont.)
  • Started in 1980s with videotape, broadcast,
    satellite, and cable.
  • Large organizations like the US Department of
    Defense invested large sum of money to set up
    satellite network for training purposes.

42
43
Third Generations of Distance Education (Cont.)
  • In 1981, PBS (Public Broadcasting Service)
    Adult Learning Service (ALS) joined with 190
    public television stations and about 2,000
    colleges to offer over 80 telecourses for credit
    with enrollment of over 470,000 students.
  • In 2005, PBS dropped out of the project.

43
44
Third Generations of Distance Education (Cont.)
  • In addition to telecourses for college degree,
    ALS also offers more than 1,000 hours of
    satellite programming for professional
    development, adult literacy and other distance
    learning topics.

44
45
Fourth Generations of Distance Education.
  • Fourth Generation
  • The Web-based Learning Model
  • Interactive multimedia (IMM)
  • Internet-based access to WWW resources
  • Computer-mediated communication

45
46
Fourth Generations of Distance Education (Cont.)
  • The fourth generation is Web-based or through
    the Internet.
  • Providing instructions via the World Wide Web.
  • Business travelers and students in isolated
    areas can enjoy interactive classrooms no
    matter where they are and what time it is.

46
47
Fifth Generations of Distance Education.
  • Fifth Generation
  • The Internet Distance Education Model
  • Interactive multimedia (IMM)
  • Internet-based access to WWW resources
  • All facilities of the Internet

47
48
Fifth Generations of Distance Education (Cont.)
  • The fifth generation or Internet Distance
    Education.
  • Offers the potential to decrease significantly
    the cost of online learning.
  • Increase significantly access to education
    and training opportunities worldwide.
  • Delivers a quantum leap in economy of
    scale and associated cost-effectiveness.
  • All existing and any new facilities of the
    Internet could be used.

48
49
3. Sloan Foundation eLearning Report 2005
  • The Sloan Consortium is a consortium of
    institutions and organizations committed to
    quality online education.
  • November 2005, Sloan Consortium released a
    report entitled. Growing by degrees
    Online Education in the United States,
    2005. The report was based on survey results
    from over 1,000 colleges and universities in the
    US.

49
50
Sloan Consortium
50
51
Sloan eLearning Report 2005 (Cont.)
  • 3.1 Have the Course and Program Offerings
    in Online Education Entered the Mainstream? The
    answer is definitely Yes
  • 65 of schools offering classroom-based
    graduate courses also offer graduate courses
    in eLearning mode.
  • 63 of schools offering classroom-based
    under graduate courses also offer under
    graduate courses in eLearning mode.

51
52
Sloan eLearning Report 2005 (Cont.)
  • 3.2 Who is Teaching Online? Staffing of
    eLearning courses does not come at the expense
    of classroom-based staff
  • 65 of higher education institutions use
    full-time classroom-based instructors to
    teach in eLearning mode, while only 62 use
    full-time classroom-based instructors in
    classroom mode.

52
53
Who is Teaching Online (Cont.)
  • 74 of public colleges use full-time
    classroom-based instructors to teach in
    eLearning mode, while only 61 use full-time
    classroom-based instructors in classroom
    mode.

53
54
Sloan eLearning Report 2005 (Cont.)
  • 3.3 Is Online Education Becoming Part of
    Long-Term Strategy for Most Schools? There is a
    strong trend upwards in considering eLearning as
    a part of long-term strategy
  • In 2005, 56 of schools identify eLearning
    as a critical long-term strategy, compared
    to 49 in 2003.
  • In 2005, 72 of Associates Degree institutions
    identify eLearning as a critical
    long-term strategy, compared to 58 in
    2003.

54
55
Sloan eLearning Report 2005 (Cont.)
  • 3.4 Have Online Enrollments Continued Their
    Rapid Growth? Growth has continued at a
    good rate of 18.2
  • Overall eLearning enrollment increased from
    1.98 million in 2003 to 2.35 million in 2004.
  • eLearning enrollment growth rate is over 10
    times that projected by the National Center
    for Education Statistics for the general
    postsecondary student population.

55
56
Sloan eLearning Report 2005 (Cont.)
  • 3.5 What Else Do Chief Academic Officers
    and Faculty Believe About Online Education?
    There are some good news
  • It is no harder to evaluate eLearning course
    than classroom-based course.
  • It takes more effort to teach online.

56
57
Sloan eLearning Report 2005 (Cont.)
  • What Else (Cont.)
  • 64 believe that it takes more discipline
    for a student to succeed in eLearning course
  • 82 believe that it is no more difficult
    to evaluate the quality of an eLearning course
    than a classroom-based course.

57
58
4. Sloan Foundation eLearning Report 2006
  • November 2006, Sloan Consortium released a
    report entitled. Making the Grade
    Online Education in the United States,
    2006. The report was based on survey results
    from over 1,000 colleges and universities in the
    US.

58
59
Sloan Foundation eLearning Report 2006 (Cont.)
  • 4.1 Has the Growth of Online Enrollments Begun
    to Plateau?
  • Nearly 3.2 million students were taking at
    least one online course during the fall 2005
    term, a substantial increase over the 2.3
    million in the previous year.
  • The more than 800,000 additional online
    students is more than twice the number added
    in any previous year.

59
60
Sloan Foundation eLearning Report 2006 (Cont.)
  • 4.2 Who is Learning Online?
  • Online students, like the overall student body,
    are overwhelmingly undergraduates.
  • The proportion of graduate-level students
    is slightly higher in online education
  • relative to the overall higher
    education population.
  • Online students, especially undergraduates,
    are more likely to be studying at
    Associates institutions than are their
    face-to-face contemporaries.

60
61
Sloan Foundation eLearning Report 2006 (Cont.)
  • 4.3 What Types of Institutions Have Online
    Offerings?
  • More than 96 percent of the very largest
    institutions (more than 15,000 total
    enrollments) have some online offerings,
    which is more than double the rate observed
    for the smallest institutions.

61
62
Sloan Foundation eLearning Report 2006 (Cont.)
  • What Types of Institutions Have Online Offerings?
    (Cont.)
  • The proportion of institutions with fully
    online programs rises steadily as
    institutional size increases, and about
    two-thirds of the very largest institutions
    have fully online programs, compared to
    only about one-sixth of the smallest
    institutions.

62
63
Sloan Foundation eLearning Report 2006 (Cont.)
  • What Types of Institutions Have Online
    Offerings? (Cont.)
  • Doctoral/Research institutions have the
    greatest penetration of offering online
    programs as well as the highest overall rate
    (more than 80) of having some form of
    online offering (either courses or full
    programs).

63
64
Sloan Foundation eLearning Report 2006 (Cont.)
  • 4.4 Have Perceptions of Quality Changed for
    Online Offerings?
  • In 2003, 57 percent of academic leaders
    rated the learning outcomes in online
    education as the same or superior to those
    in face-to-face. That number is now 62
    percent, a small but noteworthy increase.

64
65
Sloan Foundation eLearning Report 2006 (Cont.)
  • Have Perceptions of Quality Changed for Online
    Offerings? (Cont.)
  • The proportion who believe that online learning
    outcomes are superior to those for
    face-to-face is still relatively small but
    has grown by 40 percent since 2003 from 12.1
    percent in 2003 to 16.9 percent.

65
66
Sloan Foundation eLearning Report 2006 (Cont.)
  • 4.5 What are the Barriers to Widespread Adoption
    of Online Education?
  • Only 4.6 percent of Chief Academic Officers
    agreed that there are no significant barriers
    to widespread adoption of online learning.
  • Nearly two-thirds of the academic leaders cite
    the need for more discipline on the part of
    online students as a critical barrier.

66
67
Sloan Foundation eLearning Report 2006 (Cont.)
  • Barriers to Widespread Adoption of Online
    Education? (Cont.)
  • Faculty issues, both acceptance of online
    and the need for greater time and effort to
    teach online, are also important barriers.
  • Neither a perceived lack of demand on the part
    of potential students nor the acceptance
    of an online degree by potential employers
    was seen as a critical barrier.

67
68
5. Sample eLearning Laws.
5.1 Thai Laws to Legalize e-Learning. 5.2 The
US Federal Internet Equity and Education
Act of 2001. 5.3 US State-Level Law to Require
eLearning.
68
69
5.1 Thai Law to Legalize eLearning
  • On April 25, 2002, Prof. Charmonman
    proposed and got approval from the Board of
    Trustees of Assumption University (AU) to
    establish the first eLearning College in
    Thailand - The College of Internet Distance
    Education announced that the College
    would eventually serve 100,000 students
    per year.

69
70
Thai Law to Legalize eLearning (Cont.)
  • If the College of Internet Distance Education
    has 100,000 students, at 100,000 baht each,
    the revenue per year is 10 billion baht.
  • If the expenses are 6 billion baht, the net
    profit is 4 billion baht per year.

70
71
Thai Law to Legalize eLearning (Cont.)
  • In the year 2002, he also met former Prime
    Minister Thaksin Shinawatra and proposed to
    him that Thailand legalize eLearning. -
    The former Prime Minister agreed and
    advised him to start the process. - So, he
    sent a letter to the Minister of
    University Affairs asking permission for
    Assumption University to offer its
    degree programs in the eLearning mode.

71
72
Thai Law to Legalize eLearning (Cont.)
- Prof. Charmonman also authored the
first draft of the first eLearning decree
in Thailand. - The government established a
committee to consider the law and he was
invited to be a member.
72
73
Thai Law to Legalize eLearning (Cont.)
  • AU team met the Minister of University Affairs
    and tried to convince him to support eLearning.
  • Rev.Bro.Dr. Prathip Martin Komolmas, the
    President Emeritus.
  • Rev.Bro.Dr. Bancha Saenghirun, the
    President.
  • Prof. Charmonman, the College CEO.

73
74
Thai Law to Legalize eLearning (Cont.)
  • In his capacity as the Founder and Chairman
    of ABAC Poll, Prof. Charmonman ordered an
    eLearning survey in 2003 which founded
    77 of the sample were interested in
    continuing their education through eLearning.

74
75
Thai Law to Legalize eLearning (Cont.)
  • On November 26, 2003, the Ministry of
    University Affairs organized an open hearing
    on the eLearning law.

75
76
Thai Law to Legalize eLearning (Cont.)
  • In his capacity as the President of the
    Computer Association of Thailand under the
    Royal Patronage of HM the King,
  • - Prof. Charmonman presented the draft law
    in the morning and chaired the open hearing
    in the afternoon.
  • - The results were used in modifying the law.

76
77
Thai Law to Legalize eLearning (Cont.)
  • In August, 2004, Prof. Charmonman was
    elected Chairman of e-ASEAN Business
    Council. - At that time, the Thai
    Government has not passed the eLearning
    decree. - So, he tried to get help from
    ASEAN. - He proposed to the ASEAN Ministers
    that eLearning be promoted by
    all ASEAN member countries and the
    Ministers agreed.

77
78
Thai Law to Legalize eLearning (Cont.)
  • Prof. Charmonman sent many letters to the
    authorities. - Dated 23 September 2002, he
    sent a letter to the Minister requesting
    permission for AU to offer eLearning.
    - Dated 15 September 2003, he sent a letter
    to the Prime Minister to speed up
    the eLearning decree.

78
79
Thai Law to Legalize eLearning (Cont.)
- Dated 14 March 2005, he sent another letter
to the Prime Minister that Cambodia
was ahead of Thailand on eLearning and
Thailand should pass the eLearning decree
as soon as possible to be ahead of Cambodia.
79
80
Thai Law to Legalize eLearning (Cont.)
  • After 3 years, 5 ministers, and many
    revisions of the eLearning law
  • In October 2005. the decree to legalize
    eLearning in Thailand was published in the
    Royal Gazette.

80
81
Thai Law to Legalize eLearning (Cont.)
  • In January 2006, AU became the first
    university in Thailand to offer a complete
    eLearning degree program, Master of Science
    in Management, with Prof. Charmonman as
    the Program Director.
  • In 2006, AU offered three MS degree programs
    and Ph.D. in eLearning Methodology which
    is the first such Ph.D. in the world.

81
82
5.2 The US Federal Internet Equity and Education
Act of 2001.
  • Prior to the year 2001, eLearning was not
    completely accepted by US laws. For example
    - To be eligible for federal financial aid,
    students had to satisfy the 50 Rule
    and the12-Hour Rule. The 50
    Rule required students to take at
    least 50 of learning in the
    classrooms.

82
83
The US Federal Internet Equity and Education Act
of 2001 (Cont.)
The 12 Hour Rule required higher-education
programs that did not operate in a
standard semester, trimester, or quarter
system to offer a minimum of 12
hours of course work a week.
83
84
The US Federal Internet Equity and Education Act
of 2001 (Cont.)
  • The 12 Hour Rule were killed by the
    Internet Equity and Education Act of 2001.

84
85
The US Federal Internet Equity and Education Act
of 2001 (Cont.)
  • Providers of eLearning services had been
    calling for abolishing the regulations
    for several years and finally considered
    the Internet Equity and Education Act of
    2001 the US law as making eLearning as
    legal as the classroom-based learning.

85
86
5.3 US State-Level Law to Require eLearning.
  • The State of Michigan of the US is the
    first to pass a law requiring every high
    school graduate to take at least one
    eLearning course.

86
87
US State-Level Law to Require eLearning (Cont.)
  • On December 13, 2005, the Michigan State
    Board of Education adopted a plan requiring
    that all Michigan students cannot graduate
    with a Grade 12 certificate without
    completing 18 credits in - English. -
    Mathematics. - Science.

87
88
US State-Level Law to Require eLearning (Cont.)
- Social Studies. - Visual and
Performing Arts. - Health and Physical
Education. - World Languages.
88
89
US State-Level Law to Require eLearning (Cont.)
  • Effective April 2006, all Michigan students
    must take at least one eLearning course to
    complete all the requirements for Grade12.
  • Michigan Virtual University (MVU) joined
    with Blackboard Inc. to deliver eLearning
    to 450,000 Michigan high school students
    during the next 3 years thru Michigan
    Virtual High School (MVHS).

89
90
US State-Level Law to Require eLearning (Cont.)
  • With Michigan passing the law requiring
    every high school student to take at least
    one eLearning course, other States will
    probably consider similar laws.
  • If the US Federal Government passes a law
    to require eLearning, other countries may
    also have serious consideration to compete.

90
91
6. Case Study at Assumption University
  • Assumption University is - The first university
    in Thailand to establish a college-level
    organization specifically to offer eLearning. -
    The first university in Thailand to
    offercomplete eLearning degree programs. - The
    first university in the world to offer a
    Ph.D. program in eLearning Methodology. The
    College is housed in a 15 US million building
    named. Srisakdi Charmonman IT Center

91
92
Srisakdi Charmonman IT Center
92
93
Searching for Ph.D. eLearning Methodology
from Google resulted in the first five entries
about Assumption University
93
94
Case Study at Assumption University (Cont.)
  • The author proposal to establish the College of
    Internet Distance Education was approved by the
    Board of Trustees of Assumption University
  • April 25, 2002, with the author as the Chairman
    of the Board and CEO of the College.
  • The author also wrote the first draft of the
    decree to legalize eLearning in Thailand
    which was later published in the Royal
    Gazette in October 2005.

94
95
Case Study at Assumption University (Cont.)
  • October 2006, the College of Internet
    Distance Education of Assumption University
    offer four complete eLearning degree
    programs. - Master of Science in
    Management. - Master of Science in
    Information and Communication
    Technology. - Master of Science in
    eLearning Methodology. - Ph.D. in
    eLearning Methodology.

95
96
The Master of Science in Management includes
a major in Human Resource Management. The
courses available are
Case Study at Assumption University (Cont.)
- MS6501 Organization Management. -
MS6502 Marketing Management. - MS6503
Financial Management. - MS6504 Operations
Research. - MS6505 Research Methods.
- MS6506 Strategic Management. -
MS6521 Human Resource Management.
96
97
Case Study at Assumption University (Cont.)
- MS6522 Leadership
and Interpersonal Dynamics. - MS6523
Organization Design and Behavior. - MS6524
Motivation and Productivity. - MS6525
Employee Development and
Training. - MS6526 Negotiation. -
MS6527 Advanced Topics
in Human Resource Management. - MS6528
Seminar in HRM Management.
97
98
7. Sample eLearning Policies.
7.1 Human Resource Policies. 7.2 Facilities and
Network Policies. 7.3 Financial and Other
Policies.
98
99
7.1 Human Resource Policy
  • In the college-level unit responsible for
    eLearning, there must be human resource policy.
    For example, the policy may state that the
    following positions must be available
  • 1) Chief Executive Officer A full
    time CEO should be appointed from those
    holding doctorate degrees or
    equivalent or at least associate
    professorship.

99
100
Human Resource Policy (Cont.)
  • 2) Executive Officers The CEO could be
    assisted by a Chief Technology Officer (CTO),
    Chief Academic Officer (CAO), Chief Operating
    Officer (COO), Chief Information Officer (CIO),
    and etc. Each school should have a Dean, and each
    program a Program Director.

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Human Resource Policy (Cont.)
  • 3) Administrative Officers such as
  • Director of Network Operation Center
  • Director of Radio and TV Courseware
    Production Center
  • Director of Web-based Courseware Production
    Center
  • etc.

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Human Resource Policy (Cont.)
  • 4) Educational and Communication Technology
    Specialist should be appointed as full time
    staff from those holding at least a masters
    degree in
  • Educational technology.
  • Instructional technology.
  • Audio-visual education to assist in systems
    instructional design, supervise and control media
    production.
  • Utilization and evaluation.

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Human Resource Policy (Cont.)
  • Testing and Evaluation Specialists should be
    appointed as full time academic staff from those
  • Holding at least a masters degree in educational
    measurement and evaluation
  • Developing and analyzing on-line and off-line
    test instruments based on objectives and learning
    experiences.

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Human Resource Policy (Cont.)
  • 6) Faculty Members - Content Expert -
    Facilitating Instructor - Thesis Advisor

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Human Resource Policy (Cont.)
  • Content Expert
  • A specialist in a subject must be appointed
  • to be in charge of the course in his area
  • of specialization.
  • Create the course syllabus with course
    description, course objectives, list of textbooks
    and journal articles, additional reading
    materials, course assessment, and etc.

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Human Resource Policy (Cont.)
  • Content Expert (Cont.)
  • Establish the contents of the course and the
    PowerPoint presentation.
  • Deliver the lectures in the studio to be
    videotaped and taped in voice.
  • Create the handout for students to download.

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Human Resource Policy (Cont.)
  • Content Expert (Cont.)
  • Set up online activities.
  • Define all activities such as exercises,
    assignments, reports, quizzes and examinations.
  • Set up assessment guidelines for the
    facilitating instructor to follow.

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Human Resource Policy (Cont.)
  • Content Expert (Cont.)
  • Develop many sets of examinations.
  • Provide a list of glossary. The College paid the
    content expert 180,000 baht per course, totaling
    over 4 million baht for 23 courses in the MSc
    in Management program.

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Human Resource Policy (Cont.)
  • Facilitating Instructor
  • Must hold at least a masters degree in the area
    of his/her specialization with university
    teaching experience or equivalent.

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Human Resource Policy (Cont.)
  • Facilitating Instructor (Cont.)
  • May be responsible for not more than 40 students
    in a course and perform the following duties
  • Acknowledge the receipt of email from the
    student within 24 hours.
  • Give responses to questions from the students
    within 72 hours.

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Human Resource Policy (Cont.)
  • Facilitating Instructor (Cont.)
  • Monitor student activities in the chat room and
    the collaborative group.
  • Check and review the student homework or
    assignment within seven days after the date of
    receipt.

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Human Resource Policy (Cont.)
  • Facilitating Instructor (Cont.)
  • Grade the examination and post the result on the
    web within seven days after the date of
    examination.
  • Submit weekly progress report of teaching to
    the Program Director.

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Human Resource Policy (Cont.)
  • Thesis Advisor
  • may be appointed and as required by the rules
    and regulations
  • may supervise not exceeding a number of graduate
    students both at the Masters and Doctoral
    degree levels.

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Human Resource Policy (Cont.)
  • 7) Internet Personnel Full-time Internet
    personnel are needed to perform the tasks
    of controlling and overseeing the use
    of Internet-based learning.
  • - Director Should be appointed
    from those holding at least a Masters
    degree in the field of information
    technology or educational and
    communication technology

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Human Resource Policy (Cont.)
  • Internet Personnel (Cont.)
  • - Internet Experts Should be appointed
    from those holding at least a Bachelors
    degree in informational technology or
    educational and communication technology.
  • - Internet Specialists Are Comprising
    Systems operators, System administrator,
    Webmaster, Web developer, Help desk
    assistants, Engineers, and Technicians.

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Human Resource Policy (Cont.)
  • Internet Personnel (Cont.)
  • - Supporting Staff Other positions maybe
    required to support the Internet services.

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7.2 Facilities and Network Policy
  • Physical Facilities Policy
  • Network Policy
  • Hardware Policy
  • Software Policy

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Facilities and Network Policy (Cont.)
  • Physical Facilities Policy
  • Required for the personnel and the network
    operation center. For example, the College
    of Internet Distance Education of Assumption
    University.

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Facilities and Network Policy (Cont.)
  • - Housed in Srisakdi Charmonman IT Center
    with 12 floors, 12,000 square meters, and
    worth about 15 US million. - All personnel of
    the College have their office in the
    building. - The network operation center
    and the computer rooms are also in the
    building.

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Facilities and Network Policy (Cont.)
  • Network Policy Network Must be highly reliable.
    There must be at least two sets of servers to
    back up each other. In the case of the College
    of Internet Distance Education of Assumption
    University, four sets of servers were installed.

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Facilities and Network Policy (Cont.)
  • - Two at Srisakdi Charmonman IT Center in
    Bangna Campus. - The other two at Huamark Campus
    or at the ISP.

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Facilities and Network Policy (Cont.)
  • Hardware Policy The quality of hardware for the
    servers and the terminals should be very high.
    For example, at Srisakdi Charmonman IT Center
    with over 1,000 computers, spare parts and
    technicians are available right at the building
    24 hours a day and seven days a week.

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Facilities and Network Policy (Cont.)
  • Software Policy - Learning Management
    System (LMS) - E-Learning Activities

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Facilities and Network Policy (Cont.)
  • Learning Management System (LMS)
  • consist of at least 12 parts
  • (1) Homepage with navigation menu (2)
    Learning centers (3) Self Access Learning
    Resource (4) External resource centers
    (5) Laboratories

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Facilities and Network Policy (Cont.)
  • Learning Management System (Cont.)
  • (6) AV Media Center (7) Assessment
    Center (8) Web board (9) Chat room
  • (10) E-mail (11) Frequently Asked
    Questions-FAQ (12) Personal Information/Profiles

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Facilities and Network Policy (Cont.)
  • E-Learning Activities (1) Orientation for each
    course. (2) Studying from the IDE packages
    or courseware. (3) Studying supplementary
    packages in prints, AV media and
    external sources via Internet links. (4)
    perform the assignment, activities and
    projects and submit them via the Internet
    for tutor-marking.

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Facilities and Network Policy (Cont.)
  • E-Learning Activities (Cont.)
  • (5) Sit in the examinations at the
    designated examination centers. (6) Get access
    to the knowledge bases(KB) or knowledge
    centers (KC), students and instructors
    profile centers, and databases. (7)
    Seek advice or consultation via the
    Internet with classmates and facilitating
    instructors.

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Facilities and Network Policy (Cont.)
  • To ensure the minimum required participation or
    attendance
  • - The software must keep records of the
    log-in with date.
  • - Time and time-intervals for each
    students participation during each
    learning sessions.

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Facilities and Network Policy (Cont.)
  • This information should have sufficient details
    and made available to the facilitating
    instructor.
  • This will help determine the student
  • - Learning progress.
  • - Learning styles.
  • - Commitment to his/her study.

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7.3 Financial and Other Policies.
  • The financial policy is required for the
    eLearning providers
  • The amount of initial investment and how
    to raise it.
  • The annual budget and the desired period
    to breakeven point.
  • Profit margin should also be stated.

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Financial and Other Policies (Cont.)
  • In case of Assumption University. It is a
    not-for-profit organization but it has been
    profitable. However, all the profits have been
    utilized in improvement of the University.
  • The Masters Degree Programs seem to
    be the most profitable.

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Financial and Other Policies (Cont.)
  • In case of Assumption University (Cont.)
  • The Bachelors Degree Programs seem to
    be less profitable than the Masters
    Degree Programs.
  • The Doctoral Degree Programs may not
    be profitable but have to be offered to
    keep the university in high standing.

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Other Policies.
  • 1) Student Policy All kinds of student
    supports should be provided. For example, a
    Call Center must be available for students to
    contact by telephone in case the students have
    difficulty in using the Internet.
  • 2) Textbook and eBook Policy In courses where
    the contents do not change at all like Calculus,
    a new courseware could be developed and used
    for years without any modification.

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Other Policies (Cont.)
  • 3) Program Length and Tuition Fees Policy
  • In the classroom-based program, a Bachelors
    Degree program can usually be completed in not
    less than three years.
  • In the eLearning mode, it can be completed in 18
    months.

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Other Policies (Cont.)
  • Program Length and Tuition Fees Policy (Cont.)
  • A Bachelors Degree may require 120 semester
    credits.
  • - each credit 13 hours of lecture
  • or 39 hours of work
  • The total hours of work required is 120 x 39
    3,480.

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Other Policies (Cont.)
  • Program Length and Tuition Fees Policy (Cont.)
  • If students do not work and is fully committed to
    studying, they can make 8 hours per day
    available.
  • They would need 3,480 / 8 435 days
  • or 435 / 30 14.5 months.
  • There maybe 12 terms or 4 quarters per year .
  • The student may choose to complete the term in 4
    months, 3 months, 2 months, or 1 month.

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Other Policies (Cont.)
  • Program Length and Tuition Fees Policy (Cont.)
  • Assumption University the rate of tuition fees
    for eLearning mode is made a little less than
    for the classroom mode.
  • For a subject which does not change, e.g.
    Calculus, and Statistics, once the initial
    investment has reached the breakeven point, the
    rate of tuition fees can be made very low.

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Other Policies (Cont.)
  • 4) Evaluation Policy
  • The evaluation of process The pretest,
    activities, assignments and practical work
    performed while taking the course. The
    assignments and practicum may be marked and the
    scores may be used as parts of the final
    evaluation.

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Other Policies (Cont.)
  • The evaluation of product This must comprise
    the final examinations and final projects. The
    eLearning provider must develop the guideline
    or the operation plan for both the mid-term and
    final examinations to be administered in an
    examination center where the inspection of
    student identification is possible.

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Other Policies (Cont.)
  • 5) Library Policy
  • The eLearning provider must have a present and
    future development plan for libraries for
    students, both conventional and e-libraries.
  • Existing libraries may be utilized but they
    should be converted to e-libraries.

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Other Policies (Cont.)
  • Library Policy (Cont.)
  • Each library must make available at least five
    types of documentation and information (1)
    e-books/texts (2) e-journals, (3) databases,
    (4) abstracts on-line, (5) knowledge-base/databa
    ses.

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8. Concluding Remarks.
  • From Sloan Consortium Report in 2006, 96
    of US large university (over 15,000
    students) offer eLearning.
  • There is no field of study where
    eLearning is not used.

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Concluding Remarks (Cont.)
  • More and more universities and colleges
    are offering eLearning degree programs.
  • Hanoi Open University should join the
    bandwagon for the benefits of all concerned.

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Thank you
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