Give Me Liberty - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Give Me Liberty PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 14bad-ZGRhN



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Give Me Liberty

Description:

Interracial alliance. Extent. Limits. Involvement of women. Mary Elizabeth Lease ... Pockets of interracial unionism. For black men. For black women. Kansas Exodus ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:318
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 30
Provided by: ksuwebK
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Give Me Liberty


1
Chapter 17
Norton Media Library
Give Me Liberty! An American History Second
Edition Volume 2
by Eric Foner
2
I. Agrarian revolt
  • The farmers plight
  • Generally
  • Falling agricultural prices
  • Growing economic dependency
  • Regional variants
  • In trans-Mississippi West
  • In South
  • Farmers Alliance
  • Origins and spread
  • Strategies
  • Initial cooperative approach exchanges
  • Turn to subtreasury plan, political engagement

3
I. Agrarian revolt (contd)
  • Advent of Peoples (Populist) party
  • Scope of following
  • Grassroots mobilization
  • Guiding vision
  • Commonwealth of small producers as fundamental to
    freedom
  • Restoration of democracy and economic opportunity
  • Expansion of federal power
  • Omaha platform

4
I. Agrarian revolt (contd)
  • Populist coalition
  • Interracial alliance
  • Extent
  • Limits
  • Involvement of women
  • Mary Elizabeth Lease
  • Support for womens suffrage
  • Electoral showing for 1892
  • Prospects for Populist-labor alliance
  • Context
  • Economic collapse of 1893
  • Resurgence of conflict between labor and capital
  • Sharpening of government repression of labor

5
I. Agrarian revolt (contd)
  • Prospects for Populist-labor alliance
  • Key episodes
  • Miners strike at Coeur dAlene, Idaho
  • Coxeys Army
  • Pullman strike
  • Populist appeals to industrial workers in 1894
  • Some success among miners
  • Minimal success among urban workers preference
    for Republicans

6
I. Agrarian revolt (contd)
  • Election of 1896
  • Campaign of William Jennings Bryan
  • Joint support by Democrats and Populists
  • Electrifying rhetoric
  • Themes
  • Free silver
  • Social Gospel overtones
  • Vision of activist government
  • National tour to rally farmers and workers
  • Campaign of William McKinley
  • Insistence on gold standard
  • Massive financial support from big business
  • National political machine Mark Hanna

7
I. Agrarian revolt (contd)
  • Election of 1896
  • 3. Outcome
  • Sharp regional divide
  • McKinley victory
  • 4. Significance and legacy
  • Emergence of modern campaign tactics
  • Launching of Republican political dominance
  • Fading of Populism

8
II. The Segregated South
  • Redeemers in power
  • Dismantling of Reconstruction programs
  • Convict lease system
  • Failures of the New South
  • Limits of economic development
  • Persistence of regional poverty
  • Black life
  • Rural
  • Varied prospects around region
  • Elusive quest for land

9
II. The Segregated South (contd)
  • Black life
  • 2. Urban
  • Network of community institutions
  • The black middle class
  • Racially exclusive labor markets
  • Pockets of interracial unionism
  • For black men
  • For black women
  • Kansas Exodus

10
II. The Segregated South (contd)
  • Decline of black politics
  • Narrowing of political opportunity for black men
  • Shifting of political initiative for black women
  • National Association of Colored Women
  • Middle-class orientation
  • Pursuit of equal rights and racial uplift
  • Range of activities
  • Disfranchisement
  • Persistence of black voting following
    Reconstruction
  • Mounting alarm over specter of biracial
    insurgency
  • Elimination of black vote, state by state
  • Justifications and motivations

11
II. The Segregated South (contd)
  • Disfranchisement
  • 5. Effects
  • Massive purging of blacks from voting rolls
  • Widespread disfranchisement of poor whites as
    well
  • Emergence of southern white demagogues
  • 6. The Norths blessing
  • Senate
  • Supreme Court

12
II. The Segregated South (contd)
  • Segregation
  • Fluidity of race relations following
    Reconstruction
  • Green light from Supreme Court for legal
    segregation
  • Civil Rights Cases
  • Plessy v. Ferguson
  • Separate but equal doctrine
  • Justice Harlan dissent
  • Spread of segregation laws across South
  • Unreality of separate but equal
  • Segregation as component of overall white
    domination
  • Social etiquette of segregation
  • Effects on other non-white groups

13
II. The Segregated South (contd)
  • G. Rise of lynching
  • Motivations
  • Shocking brutality
  • The rape myth
  • Ida B. Wellss antilynching crusade
  • A distinctly American phenomenon
  • H. Uses of historical Memory
  • Civil War as family quarrel among white
    Americans
  • Reconstruction as horrible time of Negro rule
  • Erasure of blacks as historical actors

14
III. Contrasting notions of nationhood
  • New nativism
  • Against new immigrants from southern and
    eastern Europe
  • Depictions of new immigrants
  • As lower races
  • As threat to American Democracy
  • Campaigns to curtail
  • Immigration Restriction League
  • Efforts to bar entry into United States
  • State disfranchisement measures

15
III. Contrasting notions of nationhood (contd)
  • New nativism
  • Against immigrants from China
  • Congressional exclusion of Chinese women
  • Congressional exclusion of all Chinese
  • Passage in 1882
  • Renewal in 1892, 1902
  • Discrimination and violence against
    Chinese-Americans
  • Uneven positions of Supreme court on rights of
    Chinese
  • Yick Wo v. Hopkins
  • United States v. Wong Kim Ark
  • Fong Yue Ting
  • Precedent for legal exclusion of other groups

16
III. Contrasting notions of nationhood (contd)
  • Booker T. Washington and the scaling back of
    black demands
  • Background on Washington
  • 1895 Atlanta address
  • Washington approach
  • Repudiation of claim to full equality
  • Acceptance of segregation
  • Emphasis on material self-help, individual
    advancement, alliance with white employers

17
III. Contrasting notions of nationhood (contd)
  • American Federation of Labor and the scaling back
    of labors outlook
  • Rise of the AFL, Samuel Gompers
  • AFL-Gompers approach
  • Reproduction of broad reform vision, political
    engagement, direct confrontation with capital
  • Emphasis on bargaining with employers over wages
    and conditions business unionism
  • Narrower ideal of labor solidarity
  • Concentration on skilled labor sectors
  • Exclusion of blacks, women, new immigrants

18
III. Contrasting notions of nationhood (contd)
  • Ambiguities of the womens era
  • Widening prospects for economic independence
  • Expanding role in public life
  • Growing network of womens organizations,
    campaigns
  • Womens Christian Temperance Union
  • Growing elitism of womens suffrage movement
  • Ethnic
  • Racial

19
IV. Becoming a world power
  • The new imperialism
  • Traditional empires
  • Consolidation and expansion of imperial powers
  • Cultural justifications for imperial domination
  • Abstention of United States from scramble for
    empire before 1890s
  • Continuing status as second-rate power
  • Confinement of national expansion to North
    American continent
  • Minimal record of overseas territorial
    acquisition
  • Preference for expanded trade over colonial
    holdings
  • Leading advocates

20
IV. Becoming a world power (contd)
  • C. Emerging calls for American expansion
  • Leading advocates
  • Josiah Strong (Our Country)
  • Alfred T. Mahan (The Influence of Sea Power Upon
    History)
  • Themes
  • Moral
  • Global application of manifest destiny
  • Uplift of inferior races
  • Economic
  • Expanded markets for American goods
  • Protection of international trade
  • Strategic
  • Influence

21
IV. Becoming a world power (contd)
  • Intervention in Hawaii
  • American trade and military agreements
  • Economic dominance of American sugar planters
  • Over throw of Queen Liliuokalani
  • Rise of assertive nationalism
  • Contributing factors
  • Depression-era quest for foreign markets
  • Concern over economic and ethnic disunity
  • Manifestations
  • Rituals
  • Pledge of Allegiance
  • Star-Spangled Banner
  • Flag Day
  • Yellow journalism

22
IV. Becoming a world power (contd)
  • Spanish-American War
  • Background
  • Long Cuban struggle for independence from Spain
  • Renewal of struggle in 1895
  • Harsh Spanish response
  • Growing American sympathy for Cuban cause
  • Toward intervention
  • Destruction of battleship Maine
  • War fever, fanned by yellow press
  • U.S. Declaration of war Teller Amendment

23
IV. Becoming a world power (contd)
  • Spanish-American War
  • 3. The war
  • In Philippines
  • Admiral George Deweys victory at Manila Bay
  • Landing of American troops
  • In Cuba and Puerto Rico
  • Landing of American troops
  • Naval victory of Santiago
  • Theodore Roosevelts Rough Riders legendary
    charge up San Juan Hill
  • Swift defeat of Spain

24
IV. Becoming a world power (contd)
  • From liberator to imperial power
  • Postwar attainment of overseas empire
  • Varied arrangements
  • Annexation of Hawaii
  • Acquisition of Philippines, Puerto Rico, Guam
  • Qualified sovereignty for Cuba, Platt Amendment
  • Value as outposts for U.S. naval and commercial
    power
  • Open Door policy
  • Initial welcome in former Spanish colonies for
    U.S. forces
  • As agent of expanded trade and social order
  • As agent of social reform and national self-rule

25
IV. Becoming a world power (contd)
  • From liberator to imperial power
  • 4. Growing disenchantment in Philippines
  • Founding of provisional government by Emilio
    Aguinaldo
  • U.S. failure to recognize insistence on
    retaining possession
  • 5. Philippine war
  • Bloodiness and brutality
  • Controversy in United States
  • Outcome
  • 6. Legacy of poverty and inequality in American
    possessions

26
IV. Becoming a world power (contd)
  • H. Status of territorial peoples
  • Limits on claims to American freedom
  • Forakaer Act
  • Insular Cases
  • Divergent futures for American territories
  • Hawaii (statehood)
  • Philippines (independence)
  • Guam (unincorporated territory)
  • Puerto Rico (commonwealth)
  • I. American debate over imperial expansion
  • Opponents (Anti-Imperialist League) republic or
    empire?
  • Proponents benevolent imperialism

27
V. America at dawn of twentieth century
28
Studyspace link
http//www.wwnorton.com/foner
29
End slide
This concludes the Norton Media Library Slide Set
for Chapter 17
Give Me Liberty! An American History 2nd Edition,
Volume 2
by Eric Foner
W. W. Norton Company Independent and
Employee-Owned
About PowerShow.com