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Mission Statement

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Larry and Kathy Martin, the owners of the home were the first house parents. ... BRAHMA HOUSE ... First, the house parent model was abandoned in lieu of around ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Mission Statement


1
Welcome!
2
Executive Director Training
Jeffrey Fetzko, ACSW, LSW, CFREExecutive
Director
3
What we will cover in the next hour
  • History of the Somerset Home
  • Mission, Guiding Principles, Philosophy
  • Program Implementation Timetable
  • Funding
  • Fiscal Management
  • Agency Web Site

4
History
5
  • Somerset Home for Temporarily
  • Displaced Children
  • Incorporated 1970

6
Founders
  • The founding board of the Somerset Home for
    Temporarily Displaced Children (Somerset Home)
    were members of the evening membership division
    (EMD) of the Somerville Civic League. The EMD
    formally disbanded in 1990.

7
BRAHMA HOUSE (formerly Somerset Youth Shelter)
  • We were the first private youth shelter in N.J.
    when we opened our doors to runaway, homeless and
    abused youth on March 3, 1973. Larry and Kathy
    Martin, the owners of the home were the first
    house parents.

Somerset Youth Shelter Garretson Road Bridgewater

1973-1975
8
BRAHMA HOUSE
  • The capacity at that time was 12. Kids of all
    ages and even mothers with small children were
    admitted. The Somerset County Probation
    Department (status offenders) and DYFS (child
    welfare) were the primary referral sources.

9
BRAHMA HOUSE
  • In 1974, the Martins, no longer interested in
    being house parents because of the long hours,
    resigned and moved out but continued to rent to
    the Somerset Home. Over the next few years, three
    sets of house parents held the job.

10
BRAHMA HOUSE
  • Then in 1975, two major changes occurred. First,
    the house parent model was abandoned in lieu of
    around the clock child care staff. And second,
    the Martins decided not to renew the Somerset
    Home's lease.

11
BRAHMA HOUSE
  • Somerset Home rented a single-family home on
    Grove Street in Somerville and began to search
    for a permanent program site for Brahma House.

1975 1976 Grove Street Somerville
12
BRAHMA HOUSE
  • Later that year, a house on Cliff Street in
    Somerville was purchased by Somerset Home and
    major zoning issues, community opposition and
    several months of Superior Court litigation
    resulted. The final ruling was against our plan.
    The building was later purchased and converted
    to law offices.

13
BRAHMA HOUSE
  • In 1976, the Brahma House found a permanent site
    at 49 Brahma Avenue, the former Bradley Gardens
    Firehouse.

1976 - today
14
Clinical and Educational Services were added to
Brahma House in 1982
Counseling
Tutoring
Transitional Learning Center Basic Skills
Education Program
15
PATHWAYS
  • In 1986, it was determined a program for older
    adolescents needing independent living skills was
    needed.
  • Pathways Independent Living Program (ILP)
    teaches life skills through individual counseling
    and group workshops.

16
PATHWAYS Independent Living Skills
  • Group Workshops, Individual Counseling
  • Linkages - School Based Youth Services Program
    (at Somerset County Vocational Technical High
    School

1985-today
17
PASSAGES Transitional Living Program (TLP)
  • In 1987, Passages opened serving five young
    women (16-18 yrs. old).

Passages Somerville 1987-1992
18
PASSAGES AND PATHWAYS FIND A HOME
  • In 1992, the Passages finds a permanent home on
    Fourth Avenue in Bridgewater and now houses 10
    youth, ages 16-21.
  • The Pathways independent living program staff
    and life-skills resource center were also
    relocated to this new building.

1991-today Passages/Pathways 16 Fourth Avenue B
ridgewater
19
BRAHMA HOUSE EXPANSION
  • Once the Pathways/Passages building was
    finished, the need for additional space at
    Brahma House became the next priority. In 1995
    the board of trustees approved a plan to expand
    counseling office space at the shelter and to
    purchase the house next door at 47 Brahma for
    additional recreation and parking space.

20
BRAHMA HOUSE EXPANSION

PICNIC AREA/PARKING EXPANSION, SECOND FLOOR
COUNSELING OFFICES
1996-1999
RECREATION ROOM 1988-1989
21
HOMELESS YOUTH ACT
  • New Jersey adopted the Homeless Youth Act in
    1999. This law provides youth with safety from
    the streets without a court order and increased
    funding for shelters, TLP programs (such as
    Passages) and street outreach programs. Somerset
    Home worked in partnership with Covenant House
    and the Garden State Coalition to make this law a
    reality.

22
VISION 2005
  • One of the major steps in the history of
    organizational development is the accreditation
    by the Council on Accreditation in 2001. This
    accreditation was part of an 18-month process and
    accomplished one of the major goals outlined in
    the Vision 2005 Strategic Plan.
  • Accreditation by COA ensures adherence to the
    highest service standards in the field.

COA TEAM 2001
COA TEAM 2005
23
 STREET OUTREACH
  • The street outreach program has identifies more
    than 50 homeless youth ages 16-21, each year.
    The need for expanding transitional housing for
    older youth has become evident.

Street Outreach 1998-today
24
MY PLACE WHITNEY HOUSE
  • My Place (2005) and Whitney House (2006) are two
    5-bed TLP group homes for youth ages 18-21.

Whitney House Whitney Court Bridgewater
My Place Third Avenue Bridgewater
25
COA Reaccredidation May 2005
The agency must be reaccredited every four years
and remains reaccredited today.

26
BRAHMA HOUSE
In June 2005, the Somerset Youth Shelter program
changed its name to Brahma House.
Brahma House provides short term residential
care, assessment and crisis stabilization
services for youth ages 13-17.
27
Mission Statement
  • It is the mission of the Somerset Home for
    Temporarily Displaced Children to provide abused,
    neglected and homeless youth with housing, a
    stable environment and supportive services that
    equip them to become contributing members of
    society.

28
Guiding Principle I
  • Staff Are Important
  • Somerset Home believes its staff must be valued
    and treated with respect and dignity, have
    clearly established expectations and standards
    for performance, receive appropriate and ongoing
    training, be given constructive feedback
    regularly, be shown appreciation and thanked for
    a job well-done, be given opportunities to effect
    change in program design and be compensated
    appropriately and fairly for their efforts.

29
Guiding Principle II
  • Clients Are Important
  • Somerset Home believes that our primary
    obligation is to the youth we serve.

30
Guiding Principle III
  • Part of Something Special
  • Somerset Home staff and volunteers are part of
    something special. Their connection with our
    programs should be more than just a job or
    something to do in their spare time. We deliver
    our services better than anyone else. Everyone
    connected with our programs should feel they
    receive as much as they give. Positive energy is
    contagious and will extend to all we serve.

31
Guiding Principle IV
  • Valuing Youth
  • We believe we have an obligation to educate and
    encourage policymakers to be active in
    acknowledging, protecting and enhancing the value
    of youth to the nation.

32
Guiding Principle V
  • Empowering Youth
  • We believe youth empowerment is the act of
    bringing out natural talents and energies of
    youth. Youth can increase individual self-worth
    and skills and help build essential social
    services, while having a significant impact on
    services to communities, states and the nation.
    Youth should be active participants in decisions
    affecting their lives, including their living
    situations. Further, the involvement of young
    people in the planning and implementation of
    services and in mobilizing community support for
    programs that affect their lives and those of
    their families is essential to their individual
    development and the success of the programs
    working with them.

33
Guiding Principle VI
  • Strengthening Families
  • We believe families are the foundation of our
    youth and society. Further, youth thrive when
    positive change is effected in the family
    context. The primary function of the family, at
    minimum, is to protect, nurture and educate
    children. Often, for many reasons, families are
    challenged in this role. We, then, must
    acknowledge and build on existing family
    strengths, with the primary objective of unifying
    families. We recognize that a family environment
    is the most appropriate setting for youth.

34
Guiding Principle VII
  • Promoting Healthy Alternatives
  • We believe in healthy, positive alternatives for
    all youth. We believe young people can and will
    make informed choices concerning their own health
    and futures. We believe voluntary,
    community-based, youth-involved services can help
    youth adopt healthy, positive alternatives. These
    services allow for adult guidance and support,
    esteem-building activities, assistance in
    building personal decision-making skills and
    freedom of choice.

35
Guiding Principle VIII
  • Supporting Diversity
  • We believe each person is unique and important.
    We value, encourage and celebrate the diversity
    of individuals of each race, age, sex, ethnicity,
    culture, sexual orientation, physical ability,
    religion and family background. All youth are
    entitled to receive services that recognize and
    are based on cultural strengths and differences.
    Organizational procedures, as well as public
    policies, must reflect positive efforts to
    promote the equality of all people, including
    youth. Programs serving youth and their families
    accommodate differences and encourage access to
    services and participation by lesbian, gay,
    bisexual and transgender and questioning youth as
    well as racial, ethnic and cultural minorities.

36
Guiding Principle IX
  • Encouraging Community Based Services
  • We believe communities need to be the creators
    and partners in the development of innovative
    youth services. Partnerships between the public,
    private and nonprofit sectors need to strive to
    create innovative community resources that ensure
    essential needs are met for individual programs
    and other community endeavors. Volunteerism is
    encouraged, valued and recognized.

37
Guiding Principle X
  • Networking
  • We believe quality services for youth -
    nationally, regionally and locally - are
    dependent on and developed and enhanced through
    networking (that is, information-sharing, the
    coordination of services and mutual support).
    Somerset Home is committed to strengthening
    networking activities at local, state, regional
    and national levels. Reciprocity, diverse
    representation, mutual respect, uninhibited
    communication and leadership are essential
    elements of dynamic networking.

38
Guiding Principle XI
  • Youth/Adult Partnerships
  • We believe youth/adult partnerships play a very
    important role in achieving the goals of
    organizations working with, and on behalf of,
    youth and families. These dynamic, interactive
    relationships are built by people acknowledging
    and honoring each other's uniqueness while
    striving for balance between their different
    attributes in order to achieve a common goal.
    Youth/adult partnerships recognize that people of
    all ages are inherently worthy and they strive to
    value this within themselves and one another.

39
Guiding Principle XII
  • Quality of Service
  • Somerset Home believes that the youth and
    families it serves deserve no less than
    excellence in all programs and services.

40
Guiding Principle XIII
  • Sound Managerial Practices
  • The Somerset Home will adhere to sound
    managerial practices to maximize the use of its
    resources by maintaining an awareness of all
    rules, regulations, and procedures affecting our
    business and clients.

41
Guiding Principle XIV
  • Board Is Important
  • Somerset Home believes the board of trustees is
    integral to the success of the organization
    through its governance role and its participation
    in support of the agency's strategy, mission,
    programs, and financial well-being.

42
FINANCIAL
2008 Total (approximately) 4 million
Operating Budget 3.5 million Capital Budget
500,000

43
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45
Web Sites
  • somersethome.org
  • runforrunaways.com
  • njacyf.org
  • nn4youth.org
  • alliance1.org

46
Thank You!
Jeffrey Fetzko
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