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Child Welfare in Ontario: Implementing a Collaborative Intervention Model for Child Protection Servi

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In 2004, the Local Directors Section and Zone Chairs for ... Adopting a Strengths Based Perspective is Not New For Many but Long Overdue at a Systems Level ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Child Welfare in Ontario: Implementing a Collaborative Intervention Model for Child Protection Servi


1
Child Welfare in OntarioImplementing a
Collaborative Intervention Model for Child
Protection ServicesFinding the Key to
SuccessPhase IISeptember 2006
2
Introduction
  • In 2004, the Local Directors Section and Zone
    Chairs for Ontario Childrens Aid Societies
    approved a provincial project to examine and
    recommend improvements based upon the recognized
    need for transformation to child welfare practice
    within the province. It was called Enhancing
    Positive Worker Interventions with Children and
    their Families in Protection Services Best
    Practices and Required Skills.
  • This committees initial phase of work was
    completed in August of 2005, with a Project CD
    encompassing various reference materials and the
    Position Paper. The Paper recommended a child
    welfare policy and practice shift in Ontario
    towards what we have called a collaborative
    intervention model.
  • The Phase II committee discussed a number of
    specific comments from the field and where
    necessary, revised the present content or
    incorporated new aspects into the final Position
    Paper. Positive feedback surpassed negative
    feedback, but the strength of any work lies in
    its response to the tough questions posed from
    the field.
  •  

3
The Collaboration Model An Overview
  • The Phase II Committee reviewed all feedback from
    the initial paper and input has been incorporated
    where possible.
  • The 64-page document clarifies the model,
    outlines a set of principles, puts forth a
    values, vision, mission statement, and raises
    further questions and areas for self-reflection.
  • In essence, we envision CASs, collateral service
    providers and the broader community, working
    together in a collaborative manner to ensure Safe
    Children . . .Stronger Families . . . Supportive
    Communities.

4
Report From The Working Group
  • Developing Collaboration at an Agency Level
  • Build and Maintain Trust Internally/Externally
  • Develop a Board Policy Statement on Collaboration
  • Develop a Collaborative Leadership Style,
    Reflective Management Philosophy and Improved
    Employee Relations
  • Change the Service Delivery Model to One of
    Collaboration
  • Develop the Agency as a Learning Community
  • Public Relations and Other Communication Mediums
    are Essential
  • Enhance Collaboration Between the Agency and the
    Broader Community
  • Implement Collaborative Outcome Measures

5
Report From The Working Group
  • Helping Supervisors with Collaboration
  • Readiness Assessment and Training are Essential,
    as Supervisors are the Cornerstone in Leading
    Change
  • Workload Issues Must be Examined
  • Supervisors Need Education in Managing Change
  • Senior Management Should Listen to Supervisors
    with respect to Possible Barriers and Challenges

6
Report From The Working Group
  • Helping Workers with Collaboration
  • Community Perspectives of Child Protection Work
    Collaboration are often Misunderstood
  • Overwhelming Caseloads Does it Change with
    Transformation?
  • Adopting a Strengths Based Perspective is Not New
    For Many but Long Overdue at a Systems Level
  • Front Line Workers Must Rely on Supervisors to
    Support Their Collaborative Efforts
  • An Evaluative Process is Essential to Ensure
    Success

7
Report From the Working Group
  • Collaboration and the Community
  • It is imperative to Adopt an Ecological Model in
    Child Protection Practice
  • Greater System Accountability is Expected at the
    Community Level
  • We Must Look at Systemic Issues and Community
    Factors Contributing to Risk Beyond the
    Parent-Child Relationship
  • Community Collaboration Can Only be Achieved
    Through Engagement

8
Report of The Working Group
  • Enhancing the Best Practice and Philosophical
    Commonalities Between CASs and Schools of Social
    Work
  • There Needs to be Enhanced Collaborative
    Relationships Developed with Schools of Social
    Work and CASs
  • Use Competencies as one Basis for Child Welfare
    Education in Schools of Social Work
  • Develop Mutual Training Opportunities and
    Educational Upgrading

9
Report From the Working Group
  • Research Grant in Aid Approved
  • A three-year Study on Worker-Parent Engagement
    and its Impact on Child Safety, Permanency, Child
    Well Being and Family and Community Support will
    soon commence in eight CASs, in cooperation with
    McMaster Universitys School of Social Work
  • Key Concepts to be examined include Parent
    Engagement Worker Engagement Worker-Parent
    Engagement Casework Skills and Child Welfare
    Outcome

10
Conclusion
  • No project on collaboration could be complete
    without the consideration of reconciliation of
    child welfare with Aboriginal People. The report
    comes forth with recommendations in this regard.
  • Over the past two years, over twenty very
    committed representatives from the field of child
    welfare and collateral organizations, came
    together on a regular basis to help map out a
    collaborative intervention model for child
    protection services in Ontario. We are indebted
    to them and their respective organizations.
  • As this project winds down, it is our sincere
    hope that the leadership within the field will
    embrace the information contained in the report
    and accompanying CD, and will act accordingly.
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