Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Overview January 2005 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Overview January 2005

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Title: Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Overview January 2005


1
Department of Homeland Security Science and
TechnologyOverview January 2005
Dr. Mary Ellen Hynes Deputy, Critical
Infrastructure Protection Portfolio Plans,
Programs, and Budgets Science and
Technology U.S. Department of Homeland Security
2
Outline
  • DHS Overview
  • Science and Technology (ST) Overview
  • The ST Portfolios for Research, Development,
    Testing and Evaluation

3
DHS Mission
  • Prevent terrorist attacks within the US
  • Reduce vulnerability
  • Minimize damage, assist in recovery
  • Enhance normal functions
  • Ensure economic security is not diminished

4
Department of Homeland Security
Secretary (Ridge) Deputy Secretary (formerly
Loy)
  • Coast Guard
  • Secret Service
  • Citizenship Immigration
  • Ombudsman
  • Civil Rights and Civil Liberties
  • Legislative Affairs
  • General Counsel
  • Inspector General
  • State Local Coordination
  • Private Sector Coordination
  • International Affairs
  • National Capital Region
  • Coordination
  • Counter-narcotics
  • Small and Disadvantaged
  • Business
  • Privacy Officer
  • Chief of Staff

Management
Border Transportation Security
Science Technology
Information Analysis Infrastructure Protection
Emergency Preparedness Emergency Response
5
Science Technology Directorate Organization
Under Secretary for Science Technology (McQuear
y)
Office of Research and Development (McCarthy)
Office of Systems Engineering
Development (Kubricky)
Assistant Secretary and Principal Deputy Plans
Programs and Budgets - PPB (Albright)
H.S. Advanced Research Projects Agency -
HSARPA (Oxford, acting)
6
Science and Technology Directorate (ST) MISSION
  • Conduct, stimulate, and enable research,
    development, test, evaluation, and timely
    transition of homeland security capabilities to
    federal, state, and local operational end-users.
  • Anticipate, prevent, respond to, and recover from
    terrorist attacks
  • Transfer technology and build capacity of
    federal, state, and local operational end-users
  • Provide the nation with a dedicated and enduring
    ST capability

7
Risks must be assessed and managed in a dynamic
environment
Validate, Verify, Demo, Test
Threats
Vulnerabilities
Risks
Generate Scenarios
Consequences
  • Decision Support System
  • Identification of Critical Nodes
  • Consequences of Attacks (cascading effects)
  • Measures of Effectiveness
  • Investments Strategies for Prevention,
  • Protection, Mitigation, Response, Recovery

8
Types of Threats
Nuclear Weapon/Explosive Radiological Dispersal
Device Biological Weapon/Material Chemical
Weapon/Material Conventional Explosive Physical
Force Cyber Means Insider Emerging Threats
Info Telecomm
Banking Finance
Public Health
Transportation

Energy
Water
Food
Targets
Prevent Attacks
Reduce Vulnerability Minimize Damage Recover
Homeland Security Strategic Objectives
9
ST Research Agenda
  • Bio-Countermeasures
  • Chemical Countermeasures
  • Radiological and Nuclear Countermeasures
  • Explosives Countermeasures
  • Standards
  • Threat and Vulnerability, Testing and Assessment
  • Critical Infrastructure Protection
  • Cyber Security
  • Conventional Missions

10
Bio-Countermeasures
  • Urban monitoring including BioWatch
  • Detection technologies
  • Decontamination and restoration
  • BioAssays
  • Forensics and attribution
  • National agro-bioterrorism strategy

11
Chemical Countermeasures
  • Key characteristics sought
  • Rapid response
  • Low false alarm rates
  • Wide area release detection
  • Facility protection
  • Chemical characterization and detection
  • Response and restoration

12
Radiation/Nuclear Countermeasures
  • System Architectures and Pilot Deployment
  • Systems Analysis and Integration
  • Sensor Networks
  • Countering Surreptitious Entry
  • Pre-Planned Product Improvement
  • Detection Technology
  • Passive Detection
  • Active Interrogation
  • Incident Management and Recovery
  • Crisis Response
  • Consequence Management
  • Attribution

13
Explosives Countermeasures
  • Detectors
  • Improve existing bulk trace technologies
  • Combine existing technologies for new purposes
  • Develop novel technologies
  • stand-off detection, false alarm reduction,
    address new threats
  • Systems Approach
  • Improve efficiency
  • Better tailor technologies to applications
  • Improve situational awareness
  • Harden potential targets
  • Applications
  • Civil aviation
  • Other transportation modes
  • Infrastructure (bridges, power lines)
  • Fixed assets
  • General population

14
Threat and Vulnerability, Testing and Assessment
  • Advancing intelligence and information analysis
    capabilities
  • Biometrics
  • Net-assessments
  • WMD assessments
  • Cyber security
  • Advanced scientific computing
  • Mapping and warning systems RD
  • Behavioral research

15
Critical Infrastructure Protection
  • The National Strategy for Homeland Security
    identifies 14 sectors and key assets that will be
    protected
  • Key Assets National Monuments and Icons, Nuclear
    Power Plants, Dams, Government Facilities,
    Commercial Key Assets

Most of US Infrastructure is privately owned
16
Critical Infrastructure Protection
  • Interdependency modeling
  • Protection of facilities and capabilities
  • Self-correcting systems
  • Self-defending systems
  • Automated response platforms
  • Video motion detection
  • Multi-senor warning systems
  • Defeat insider adversaries
  • National Critical Infrastructure Protection RD
    Plan

17
Standards
  • Minimum performance specifications and test and
    evaluation protocols
  • Developed primarily within voluntary consensus
    standards framework to ensure effectiveness
  • CBRNE, Human, and Cyber/IT threat countermeasures
    components and systems
  • Personnel training and certification
  • Analyses and information

18
Conventional Missions
National security special events
Illicit Trafficking
Protectees and facilities
Next generation non-intrusive inspection systems
Hardening targets
Investigation and apprehension
Interoperable communications
U.S. Secret Service
Border and Transportation Security
Surveillance and Monitoring
Safe Cities
Command and control
Maritime traffic and navigation
Personal protection for first responders
Detection technologies
Emergency Preparedness and Response
Wide-area surveillance
Ballast water verification
U.S. Coast Guard
19
Office of Research and Development
  • Intramural programs, conducted by federal
    research laboratories
  • DOE National Labs
  • University programs
  • Scholars and Fellows
  • University Centers of Expertise

20
Homeland Security Scholars and Fellows
  • 2003 Class
  • 50 Scholars (undergrad) and 50 Fellows
    (post-grad) in engineering, math/computer
    science, social sciences and psychology, life
    sciences, physical sciences already announced
  • 2004
  • Similar number of Awards for 2004 Class
  • Internships in DHS venues

21
Homeland Security University Centers of
Excellence
  • Mission focused and designed to exploit
    multi-disciplinary university environment
  • Responsive to identified scientific and knowledge
    gaps
  • Complementary to other project activities
  • Center design requires active partnerships and
    outreach to industry, local government and labs
  • Current Centers
  • Risk-based economic modeling University of
    Southern California
  • Agricultural bio-security (2) Texas AM and
    University of Minnesota (exotic animal diseases
    and food safety)
  • Next Center
  • Behavioral and Social Aspects of Terrorism and
    Counterterrorism

22
Homeland Security Advanced Research Projects
Agency (HSARPA) - Extramural
  • HSARPA BAAs / RAs / etc.
  • White papers ? Full proposals
  • Small Business Innovative Research FY
    2004(Pre-solicitiation notice posted 29
    September at www.eps.gov/spg)
  • Website to register products for DHS purchase
  • Technical Support Working Group (TSWG)
  • 6 to 24 months
  • Rapid prototyping
  • Commercial adaptation
  • Cooperative development
  • For HSARPA research funding opportunities,
    monitor www.dhs.gov or www.bids.tswg.gov

23
System Engineering Development
  • Transition maturing technologies to
    commercialization

24
(No Transcript)
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