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Chapter 6 Interest Groups

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This is where a group spends 'unlimited' money and creates ads that cannot use ... Members in name only (this is sometimes tricky for politicans) LEADERSHIP ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Chapter 6 Interest Groups


1
  • Chapter 6 Interest Groups
  • Have become very popular in recent years because
    of issue advocacy
  • This is where a group spends unlimited money
    and creates ads that cannot use words like vote
    for
  • The framers called them factions
  • We just learned last chapter that we are a nation
    of groupssometimes these groups organized and
    that is an example of interest groups
  • AARP
  • NAACP
  • Sometimes, these groups start as movements (large
    group of people that take an issue and act on it)

2
  • There are specific types of interest groups
  • Economic Interest Groups (guess what they deal
    with)
  • Business Coke, McDonalds, Ford, Microsoft, etc
  • Trade and Other Associations not really unions
  • National Association of Realtors
  • Labor- Unions
  • VERY popular in the 1930s-1970s
  • Two types
  • Open shop- union membership cannot be required
  • Closed shop- union membership may be required of
    employment
  • Teamsters, AFL, CIO
  • Typically back Democratic Party Candidates
  • Professional Associations
  • America Medical Association
  • National Education Association

3
  • Ideological or Single-Issue Interest Groups
  • NRA, PETA, ACLUthey take one issue and run with
    it
  • Public Interest Groups
  • These groups goal is to help the American (or
    world) public as a whole
  • Greenpeace and some tax-exempt charities are
    examples
  • Foreign Policy Interest Groups
  • Deal with foreign policy and interest
  • American-Israel Political Action Committee
  • Government and Government Employee Interest
    Groups
  • Many cities and states have lobbyists and hire
    lobbyist to present them
  • Another group is the nation Governors Association
  • Other Interest Groups
  • Fall into other category
  • VFW, Nationality groups, etc

4
  • Characteristics and Power of Interest Groups
  • SIZE AND RESOURCE
  • Mostly deals with money and manpower
  • COHESIVNESS
  • Members are usually one of three types
  • Full-time, paid, formal leaders of group
  • People intensely involved in the group, attend
    meetings, pay dues, and lots of work
  • Members in name only (this is sometimes tricky
    for politicans)
  • LEADERSHIP
  • Sometimes makes or breaks a group (are they
    reaching out to all members?)

5
  • TECHNIQUES
  • Publicity and Mass Media Appeals
  • TV ads, signs, word of mouth,
  • Mass Mailings
  • Now being done by email
  • Influence on rule makings
  • Everything done in Congress is place in the
    official document called the Federal Registers
  • Well, groups see this and put pressure on
    agencies to ensure regulations are being carried
    out
  • Litigation
  • Lawsuit
  • Election Activities
  • Ads, voting campaigns, money

6
  • Forming a Political Party
  • Green Party is a good example
  • Cooperative Lobbying
  • Two groups work together to get something done
  • INFLUENCE OF LOBBYIST
  • Lobbying is when you try to influence public
    officials
  • Called lobbyist because they use to stand in the
    lobby of the Capitol
  • VERY POWERFUL some companies spend millions on
    lobbyist
  • Lobbyist dealing with different groups
    networkedit is called an iron triangle

Congressional Committees
Interest Groups
Government Agencies (departments)
7
  • MONEY AND POLITICS
  • PACs (Political Action Committees) have become
    the financial arm of interest groups
  • They are legally able to get money on a
    voluntary basis from members, employees, etc
    and take that money and use it for campaign
    contributions
  • THEY HAVE BECOME INCREDITBALLY POWERFUL with over
    4000 PACs working right now
  • They use most of their money and give it to
  • Incumbents
  • Committee chairs
  • Party leaders
  • Both parties (majority and minority)

8
  • McCAIN-FEIDGOLD BILL
  • The Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 was
    passed
  • Called the McCain-Feingold Bill
  • Raised individual limits to a candidate from
    1000 to 2300 (2008) per election cycle
  • Raised individual limits to a party from 20,000
    to 28,500 per election cycle
  • Left PAC limit the same (5,000)
  • Banned most forms of soft money to political
    parties
  • However, soft money has moved to 527 groups and
    have seen their impact increase

9
The Difference between a PAC and a 527 A PAC can
accept no more than 5000. It can give up to
5000 to a candidate, and can run ads saying
whatever it wants. A 527 group can accept an
unlimited amount of money, but it can't give
money directly to a candidate, coordinate with a
candidate, or run ads that say "vote for" or
"defeat" a particular candidate. But, these
groups run ads that are far more damaging to
candidates that what most PACs run. And many
campaign consultants and staff have moved between
candidate campaigns and 527 groups, making the
claim that they don't coordinate pretty
questionable.
McCain-Feingold really it only banned political
parties from raising soft money One of the big
critiques of the bill at the time it passed was
that soft money would simply move from the
parties to these outside 527 groups. The
proponents of McCain-Feingold thought this
wouldn't happen because politicians would no
longer be asking for the money.
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