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Rubrics: Using Performance Criteria to Improve Student Achievement

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Accreditation, Accountability, and Quality: An Institutional Orientation and ... Kick-off by Margie Crutchfield. Individual team sessions for rest of day ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Rubrics: Using Performance Criteria to Improve Student Achievement


1
Rubrics Using Performance Criteria to Improve
Student Achievement
  • Martha Ross, James Madison University
  • Jeri Carroll, Wichita State University

2
Agenda
  • Program and Unit Review
  • Rubrics
  • Rubrics for Program Reports
  • Rubrics for Unit Data

3
Program Review
  • To complete a program report, institutions must
    provide evidence of meeting program (SPA)
    standards based on data from 6-8 assessments.

4
Required Program Assessments
  • Content
  • State licensure exam for program area (if
    availableotherwise another content based
    assessment)
  • Content Assessment
  • Professional and Pedagogical Knowledge Skills and
    Dispositions
  • Assessment of Planning (e.g., unit plan)
  • Student teaching/internship assessment

5
Required Program Assessments
  • P 12 Student Learning
  • Assessment of candidate impact on student
    learning or providing a supporting learning
    environment

6
Program Review
  • Section IV requires a narrative, assessment,
    scoring guide/criteria, and data tables plus a
    2-page maximum narrative for each of the 6-8
    assessments)

7
Program Review
  • Common AFIs
  • Data do not show evidence of candidates meeting
    the standard.
  • Criteria/cells of the rubric do not contain the
    language of the standards.

8
Examples
  • Elementary Education Data Table
  • Rubrics
  • Without standards language in rubric.
  • With standards language in the rubric.

9
Unit Review
  • Program Reports provide data for Standard 1
    Elements 1a, 1b, and 1d.
  • Program or unit data needed to document
  • 1c Professional and Pedagogical Knowledge and
    Skills,
  • 1e Knowledge and Skills for Other School
    Professionals
  • 1f Student Learning for Other School
    Professionals
  • 1g Professional Dispositions for All Candidates

10
Professional and Pedagogical Knowledge and Skills
  • Initial
  • Teacher candidates can apply the professional and
    pedagogical knowledge and skills delineated in
    professional, state, and institutional standards
    to facilitate learning.
  • They consider the school, family, and community
    contexts in which they work and the prior
    experience of students to develop meaningful
    learning experiences.
  • They reflect on their practice.
  • They know major schools of thought about
    schooling, teaching and learning.
  • They are able to analyze educational research
    findings and incorporate new information into
    their practice as appropriate.

11
Professional and Pedagogical Knowledge and Skills
  • Advanced
  • Candidates in advanced programs for teachers
    reflect on their practice and are able to
    identify their strengths and areas of needed
    improvement.
  • They engage in professional activities.
  • They have a thorough understanding of the school,
    family, and community contexts in which they
    work, and collaborate with the professional
    community to create meaningful learning
    experiences for all students.
  • They are aware of current research and policies
    related to schooling, teaching, learning and best
    practices.
  • They are able to analyze educational research and
    policies and can explain the implications for
    their own practice, and for the profession.

12
Examples
  • TWS Data Table
  • Rubrics
  • Without standards language in rubric.
  • Rubrics mapped to NCATE Standards and Elements.

13
Rubrics Lesson Plans Elementary Education
  • Learning Goals and Design for Instruction portion
    of the WSU Teacher Work Sample (TWS) served as an
    assessment of the candidates ability to plan
    instruction. Candidates were required to pass the
    whole TWS with a passing score of 80 or above
    (94 or more points of 117) and no less than 60
    in a section.

14
Rubrics Lesson Plans Elementary Education
  • Learning Goals The candidate sets significant,
    challenging, varied and appropriate learning
    goals.
  • Design for Instruction The candidate designs
    instruction for specific learning goals, student
    characteristics and needs, and learning contexts.

15
Rubrics Lesson Plans ElEd Health-Physical
Education
  • Category
  • Unacceptable Developing
  • Acceptable Meets
  • Target Exceeds
  • Instructors Space--Grade and Comments
  • WSU/KSDE Professional Education Standards
  • KSDE Elementary Education Standards

16
Rubrics Lesson Plans ElEd Health-Physical
Education
  • Standard 6 The kindergarten through sixth grade
    teacher knows, understands, and uses the major
    concepts of health education and human movement
    and physical activity as central elements to
    foster active, healthy life styles and enhanced
    quality of life for all students.

17
Rubrics Lesson Plans ElEd Health-Physical
Education
  • Developing
  • The lesson includes elements related to health,
    to be delivered as notes for students rather than
    meaningful uses and dispositions.
  • Acceptable
  • The lesson includes elements related to the
    health curriculum, and ways that students can
    have healthy lives.

18
Rubrics Lesson Plans ElEd Health-Physical
Education
  • Target
  • Lesson includes elements that focus on a
    meaningful application to life experiences, such
    that all students can be successful. A healthy,
    active lifestyle is the focus of the lesson.

19
Field Observation
  • Generic Observation Form

20
Field Observation
  • Content Specific Observation Form

21
Student Learning Generic
22
Student Learning Content Specific
23
WSU Lessons Learned
  • Use the language of the standards in the rubrics.
  • Use clear headings to show levels of performance.
  • Avoid using the levels of criteria in the cells
    of the rubric define what levels mean.
  • Provide requirements above the rubric as a
    checklist.

24
Modifying Unit Assessments to Meet Program
Standards
  • The James Madison University Story

25
The Infamous GenericStudent Teaching Assessment
  • Generic evaluation form since 1995
  • Originally modeled after Pathwise
  •   Framework
  • Individual program interpretation of indicators
  • And four area colleges/universities used the
    same form!

26
Last NCATE Visit Spring 2004
  • SPA program reports submitted under old process
  • No major questions raised at that time, but the
    hints were there
  • Plus some programs and cooperating teachers
    also began expressing desire for more specific
    indicators

27
Phase 1 2004-2005
  • Student teaching evaluation form revised to
    clearly assess
  • content knowledge
  • diversity
  • technology
  • impact on student learning
  • Four instructional categories
  • 23 indicators

28
ST-9 Instructional Categories
  • A. Knowledge of Content (4)
  • B. Preparation for Instruction (5)
  • C. Instructional Performance (10)
  • D. Reflection and Evaluation
  • Impact on Student Learning (4)

29
A. Knowledge of Content
  • A1. Demonstrates an understanding of appropriate
    content standards (Virginia PK-12 Standards of
    Learning, national professional standards)
  • A2. Identifies key principles and concepts of
    subject matter
  • A3. Uses examples to support basic principles of
    content
  • A4. Links content to students prior experiences
    and to related subject areas

30
Three-Point Rubric
  • A3. Uses examples to support basic principles of
    content
  • 3.0 uses appropriate AND varied examples to
    illustrate basic content principles
  • 2.0 uses some appropriate examples to illustrate
    basic content principles
  • 1.0 uses inappropriate examples OR no examples
    to illustrate basic content principles

31
Questions for ReflectionA Generic Core
  • Are the same examples used over and over when
    students need more clarity?
  • Can the student teacher create new examples for
    further clarification?
  • Are the examples appropriate for the age level
    and populations?
  • Do the examples represent different modalities?
  • Do the examples relate to diverse needs?

32
Phase 2 Spring and Summer 2006
  • Student Teaching Reference Guide aligned with SPA
    standards
  • 33 participants (10 teams/triads)
  • arts and sciences faculty
  • education faculty
  • P-12 school personnel

33

34
One-Day Workshop
  • Prior to workshop
  • participants reviewed SPA standards, JMUs
    conceptual framework, Virginia PK-12 Standards of
    Learning
  • English triad developed preliminary draft to use
    as a model
  • Kick-off by Margie Crutchfield
  • Individual team sessions for rest of day

35
Two Questions
  • What specific SPA standards correlate to this
    indicator?
  • What would this indicator look like at the 3.0
    level of scoring at your grade level and/or
    content area?

36
A3. Uses examples to support basic content
principles
  • Example 1 Math
  • NCTM Standards 1, 4, 5
  • Does candidate recognize, use, and make
    connections between and among mathematical ideas,
    and in contexts outside mathematics, to build
    mathematical understanding?
  • Does the candidate use varied representations of
    mathematical ideas to support and deepen
    students mathematical understanding?

37
A3. Uses examples to support basic content
principles
  • Example 2 Music
  • NASM Standards 3.b.4, 3.c.4
  • Does the student teacher make effective use of
    explanation, illustration, modeling (vocal,
    keyboard, other instruments), conducting, and
    verbal imagery?
  • Does the student teacher make appropriate use of
    negative as well as positive examples?

38
A3. Uses examples to support basic content
principles
  • Example 2 Music
  • NASM Standards 3.b.4, 3.c.4
  • Does the student teacher employ music from a
    range of cultures and historical periods and
    place the music in context?
  • Do warm-ups have a clear purpose? Are the
    relationships between any warm-ups and the music
    being performed made clear?

39
A3. Uses examples to support basic content
principles
  • Example 3 Foreign Language
  • ACTFL Standards 1C, 2A, 2C, 4A
  • Do candidates use variations of language to show
    students the language differences of regions
    where the language is spoken?
  • Do examples help students understand the
    similarities and differences between the target
    and heritage cultures?

40
Phase 3 Fall 2006
  • Completed revision of SPA/program-specific
    Reference Guides
  • Conducted training for university supervisors and
    all cooperating teachers
  • Held refresher workshops for current clinical
    faculty
  • Included new Reference Guides in training for new
    clinical faculty

41
Phase 3 Fall 2006
  • Piloted new evaluation forms and Reference Guide
  • 15 JMU programs / licensure areas
  • 125 JMU student teachers
  • Three of the four area colleges and universities

42
University Supervisor andCooperating Teacher
Ratings2006-2007
43
Plans for OngoingData Collection
  • Unit Level
  • Collect online from university supervisors
  • Collect hard copy from cooperating teachers
  • Aggregate and disaggregate by program,
    indicators, categories
  • Unit and Program Levels
  • Analyze for individual candidate performance
  • Analyze for program improvement
  • Analyze for improvement of unit operations

44
A Work in Progress Still Some Tweaking to Do !
  • Review all of the SPA-specific questions for
    reflection for accurate placement within the
    indicators
  • Consider changing the questions to statements
  • Consider how best to analyze and present data

45
Some Comments
  • I shouldnt tell you this, but I never looked at
    the earlier reference guide! I read this one
    each time I observe or evaluate a student
    teacher. Its very helpful!
  • - Cooperating teacher
  • It really helps in crafting concrete written
    feedback for a weaker student teacher.
  • - University supervisor

46
More Comments
  • This new reference guide is much more detailed
    and targeted to a specific subject or grade
    level.
  • - Cooperating teacher
  • I like the fact that we were included in
    revising the new guide!
  • - Clinical Faculty

47
Access and Contact Information
  • http//coe.jmu.edu/esc/Forms.shtml
  • Click on Student Teaching for
  • ST-8 - Student teaching observation form
  • ST-9 - Student teaching evaluation form
  • Student Teaching Performance Guide
  • Reference Guides for each program
  • Jane Smith smith3js_at_jmu.edu

48
Questions?
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