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Sanitary Design as an Enabler of Food Safety

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Randy Porter - Con Agra, Director of Sanitation, ... Chilled, Frozen. Dairy. Meat. Customer complaint, Product not to. specification. Consumer ill health, ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Sanitary Design as an Enabler of Food Safety


1
Sanitary Design as an Enabler of Food Safety
Joe Stout R.S. - Kraft Foods, Director
Product Protection Hygienic Design Randy
Porter - Con Agra, Director of Sanitation,
Hygienic Design Pest Management Gary
Goessel - Kelloggs, Sr. Food Safety Manager

2
General Overview
  • Joe Stout
  • Kraft Foods

3
Equipment Design
  • Agenda
  • Context of our discussion
  • Background on cleaning
  • Business case for change
  • Sanitary Design Continuous Improvement
  • Food Industry Team
  • Principles of Design

4
Equipment Design
  • Agenda
  • Context of our discussion

5
TODAY INCREASED FOCUS ON PATHOGENS
Probability
Repeated Incidents Isolated Incidents Unlikely
to occur
Confections
Meat
Dairy
Nuts
Chilled, Frozen
Fresh Fruit, vegetables
Beverages
Dry Groceries
Consequence
Customer complaint, Product not to specification
Consumer ill health, Contamination, Minor
recall, Audit non-compliance
Consumer fatality, Major recall, Products
de-listed
6
TODAY INCREASED FOCUS ON ALLERGENS
Probability
Snacks
Repeated Incidents Isolated Incidents Unlikely
to occur
Confectionary
Meat
Dry Groceries
Dairy
Chilled, Frozen
Fresh Fruit, vegetables
Beverages
Consequence
Customer complaint, Product not to specification
Consumer ill health, Contamination, Minor
recall, Audit non-compliance
Consumer fatality, Major recall, Products
de-listed
7
Requirement Factors For Quality and Food Safety
Assurance
Robust Product Formulation
Infrastructure Design
Equip Design San Procedures
Proper GMPS Quality Control
FACTOR DETAILS
  • Formulation Resistance to Spoilage
  • Equip Design Equipment cleanable and cleaned to a
    microbiological level
  • Infra Design Cleanable room and floors, humidity
    controls
  • Quality / GMPs GMPs established and monitored to
    control potential cross contamination.

8
Equipment Design
  • Agenda
  • Background on Cleaning

9
Pathogen Control Equation
Effective Sanitation Procedures Controls
Sanitary Design Equip Building
Clean, Dry Uncracked Floors
Controlled Traffic Patterns

GMPs



Pathogen Control

10
Allergen EquationManufacturing and Quality
Cleaning effective and HACCP validated
Sanitary Design Equip Building
Rework, Packaging and label controls
Effective Sanitation Procedures Execution
Awareness, (GMPs) and trained inspectors




Allergen Control

11
7 Steps of Effective Wet Sanitation
  • Dry Clean
  • Pre-rinse
  • Soap and Scrub
  • Rinse and Inspect
  • Assemble
  • Pre-Op
  • Sanitize

Good Designs simplify the cleaning process
12
7 Steps of Effective Dry Sanitation
  • Pre-Sanitation Preparation
  • Secure Dismantle
  • Pre-Clean
  • Detail Cleaning
  • Final Cleaning
  • Sanitation Inspections
  • Final Inspection and Documentation

Good Designs enhance cleaning Effectiveness
13
Equipment Design
  • Agenda
  • Business case for change

14
PATHOGENS
15
Salmonella Illnesses and Deaths Have been
reported from Peanut Butter.
Two examples
16
Salmonella scare causes Congressional Hearing
Rep. Greg Walden, R-Oregon, holds up a container
holding products made with peanut butter from the
Peanut Corporation of America at a House hearing
Wednesday. By H. Darr Beiser, USA TODAY
17
Salmonella scare sends peanut butter sales diving
(2009)
  • By Theresa Howard, USA TODAY
  • The country's biggest makers of jarred peanut
    butter have told consumers that their products
    are safe, but Americans aren't buying that or
    their products.
  • Jarred peanut butter sales for brands such as
    Skippy, Peter Pan (CAG) and Jif (SJM) fell by as
    much as 24 since the salmonella outbreak, retail
    trackers say.
  • Information Resources reports that unit sales of
    jarred peanut butter dropped by 24 for the four
    weeks ended Jan. 25 from the same period a year
    ago. The Nielsen Co. says unit sales fell 22 for
    the period ended Jan. 24 vs. the same period last
    year.
  • .

18
  • The Business Case
  • Negative events affect everyone

Recalls (12/98 - 1/99)
Source AC Nielsen Category Data, 1/14/99
19
ALLERGENS
20
Allergen Concerns
21
Food Allergen Recalls
U.S. FDA 1988-2006
Includes FDA recalls an alerts
22
Foreign Material
23
Scraper Design must be cleanable Strong and
Durable
24
This is a piece of a damaged Scraper
25
This is a smaller piece of a damaged Scraper
after a pump
26
Foreign Material (Infestation)
There are a variety of insects that seek
harborage in equipment and infrastructure void
areas. If this were to occur, the conditions
would be considered insanitary and not suitable
for the production of food for human consumption.
27
Can you guarantee that issues would not occur
with improved designs?
Not Directly but with better facility design,
cross contamination would be less likely to occur
and separation of Raw and RTE would be easily
managed.
Robust Product Formulation
Not Directly but with better equip. design,
cleaning would be more effective, enabling
enhanced control and robustness of our process.
Infrastructure Design and Cleaning
Equip Design, San Procedures Execution
Proper GMPS Quality Control
FACTOR DETAILS
  • Formulation Resistance to spoilage / pathogens
  • Equip Design Equipment cleanable and cleaned to a
    microbiological level
  • Infra Design Cleanable room and floors, humidity
    controls
  • Quality / GMPs GMPs established and monitored to
    control potential cross contamination.

28
LIFE CYCLE FOR EQUIPMENTIN A PLANT
I have to clean this for the next 20 years? What
were they thinking?
During the 20 year life cycle we will
  • Produce 2 billion meals
  • Train 250 employees on how to clean
  • Introduce and train 80 production supervisors
  • Spend up to 33,000 hours cleaning it
  • Spend 2500 hours doing pre-op inspections
  • Not produce up to 295 Million lbs. of food
  • Generate 15 million gallons of effluent BOD
  • Generate 78 million lbs of rework
  • Generate 17 million lbs. of inedible waste

2009
Proactively we will need to
  • Redesign to improve effectiveness
  • Educate management on risks
  • Spend capital to reduce risks
  • Redesign to improve cleaning
  • Redevelop cleaning procedures

2029
29
Sanitary Design Continuous Improvement Cycle
  • Design Continuum
  • Evaluate designs using check list
  • Measure success factors
  • Identify Risks (risk assessment)
  • Measure Improvements
  • Did improvements made mitigate the risks
    identified?
  • Are improvements sustainable?
  • Communicate with enablers (Engineering, Suppliers
    etc.)
  • Create a plan
  • Plan to includes how to manage design flaws and
    redesign as needed
  • Communicate with enablers (Engineering, Suppliers
    etc.)
  • Measure and improve
  • Measure plan progress at agreed upon frequency
  • Modify action plans as needed

30
Evolution of Control By Design Early Phases of
Design Circa 1950
  • Industry started to scale up mass production.
  • Equipment was not sophisticated -- cleaning was
    an after thought.
  • Materials of construction were not ideal, mostly
    paint on mild steel.
  • Heavily mechanical, without computer controls.
  • Product protection devices were not in place.
  • Equipment was installed in locations which made
    accessibility a concern.

31
Evolution of Control By Design Improvements are
apparent
  • Materials of construction are much improved.
  • Equipment is more cleanable, however
    opportunities continue
  • Equipment is designed to standards, but still
    many opportunity areas.
  • Product protection devices are in place.
  • Equipment installation has improved which
    improves accessibility for cleaning.

32
Improvements apparent but still opportunity
areas
Difficult to remove for cleaning and is a catch
point for product and microbes
Difficult to clean area not easily accessible
and potential for infestation growth.
Difficult to remove for cleaning and is a catch
point for product and microbes and infestation.
33
Evolution of Design Examples
All protection panels on line Crossovers are
pitched and Sloped to promote drainage away
From the product stream
Stair riser leg, sloped top totally sealed and
set off the riser
Manual belt lifts on conveyors to provide
improved access for sanitation
34
Evolution of Design Examples
Round Stock and Square stock Turned on
45 degree angle Totally welded Used for
framework
All plumbing pipes And electrical Conduits are
set Off the wall for better Cleaning ability
35
Sanitary Design Team Includes

E
36
Our Team wants rapid evolution of designs through
continuous improvement. The GMA ten principles
of design and the corresponding check list are
tools to be used to communicate and promote
understanding of design concepts which can
rapidly advance equipment design. Please join
us in moving forward!!
37
PRINCIPLES OF SANITARY DESIGN
  • 1. Cleanable. Equipment should be constructed to
    be cleanable to a GMP, product hazard
    (microbiological, chemical, physical), and
    quality levels, that is validated and verified by
    active monitoring programs.
  • 2. Made of Compatible Materials. Materials used
    for equipment construction must be compatible
    with the product, environment, and proposed
    cleaning methods.
  • 3. Accessible for Inspection, Maintenance,
    Cleaning and Sanitation. When needed, equipment
    should be easily disassembled for sanitation.
    without requiring special tools.

38
PRINCIPLES OF SANITARY DESIGN
  • 4. No Liquid Collection. No stagnant product
    build-up or liquid collection areas. Equipment
    should be self-draining to assure that residues
    do not accumulate or pool on the equipment.
  • 5. Hollow Areas Eliminated or Sealed. Hollow
    areas of equipment must be eliminated whenever
    possible or permanently sealed. Items such as
    bolts, studs, mounting plates, brackets, junction
    boxes, nameplates, end caps and sleeves should be
    continuously welded to the surface and not
    attached via drilled and tapped holes.
  • 6. No Niches (e.g., no pits, cracks, corrosion,
    crevices, recesses, open seams, gaps, lap seams,
    protruding ledges, inside threads, bolt rivets,
    or dead ends). Welds should be ground and
    polished smooth.

39
PRINCIPLES OF SANITARY DESIGN
  • 7. Sanitary Operational Performance. During
    normal operations, the equipment must perform so
    it does not contribute to unsanitary conditions
    or the harborage and growth of bacteria.
  • 7.1. Hygienic Design of Maintenance Enclosures.
    Human/machine interfaces such as push buttons,
    valve handles, switches and touch screens, must
    be designed to ensure product and other residues
    (including liquid) do not penetrate or accumulate
    in or on the enclosure or interface.
  • 7.2. Hygiene Compatibility with Other Plant
    Systems. Equipment design should ensure hygienic
    compatibility with other equipment and systems,
    such as electrical, hydraulic, steam, air and
    water systems.

40
PRINCIPLES OF SANITARY DESIGN
  • 8. Validated Cleaning and Sanitizing Protocols.
    Procedures for cleaning and sanitation must be
    clearly written, designed and proven effective
    and efficient. Chemicals recommended for cleaning
    and sanitation must be compatible with the
    equipment and the manufacturing environment.
  • 9. Separate Processes Wherever Possible.
    Dis-similar processes in plants or on single line
    or equipment should be properly separated to
    prevent cross contamination based on a risk
    assessment. i.e. raw from RTE.
  • 10. Meet Personnel Hygiene and Sanitation
    Requirements. All plant personnel, contractors
    and visitors must be trained and required to
    follow plant hygienic and sanitation requirements
    - NO EXCEPTIONS

41
An Example of The Checklist
42
CHECKLIST SUMMARY
43
An example feedback to a Equipment Supplier
All machine knurling will be eliminated and
replaced with T-handles
44
An example feedback to a Equipment Supplier
Areas will be cut out to allow for better access
for sanitation and reduce harborage areas
This guard will be reduced in size and and
spaced off the frame for better drainage and
improved cleanability
45
  • Thank you
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