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SESSION 5: REFLECTIVE COUNSELLING SKILLS

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Provide a summary of the previous 4 sessions. Explore the nature of emotions ... Social workers need to interpret nonverbal communication cautiously. ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: SESSION 5: REFLECTIVE COUNSELLING SKILLS


1
SESSION 5 REFLECTIVE COUNSELLING SKILLS
  • This session will
  • Provide a summary of the previous 4 sessions
  • Explore the nature of emotions
  • Look at ways of working with emotions
  • Examine how emotions are classified and
    understood
  • Discuss nonverbal behaviour
  • Experiential tasks looking at emotions, nonverbal
    behaviour, and metaphors

2
SESSION 1
  • Outline of the course and purpose a forum to
    discuss issues, to reflect on and become more
    aware of your own personal process, explore your
    strengths/limitations
  • Explanation of what counselling is
  • Explore the relationship between social work and
    counselling

3
SESSION 2
  • Examined the relationship between social work and
    counselling
  • Present the core conditions of Person-Centred
    Counselling
  • Discuss the Core Qualities required for
    counselling to be effective
  • Introduce Basic Counselling Skills
    (self-awareness and self-reflection)
  • Experiential task looking at what qualities and
    skills you would want/not want in a helper

4
SESSION 3
  • Examined current understandings of reflective
    practice
  • Explored methods of reflection
  • Looked at the nature of the self in social work
    education and practice
  • Presented the 4 levels of reflection
  • Discussed the purposes of autobiography
  • Experiential task looking at the connection
    between thoughts, feelings, and behaviours

5
SESSION 4
  • Explored relationship building in the context of
    counselling
  • Introduced the concept of the working alliance
  • Examined how the relationship acts as a vehicle
    for relearning
  • Presented active listening skills
  • Experiential task looking at emotional triggers
    and how they influence listening

6
EMOTIONS
  • Emotions are defined as
  • A state of mind usually accompanied by current
    physiological and behavioural changes and based
    on the perception of some internal or external
    object (Barker, 1995)
  • Emotional responses trigger our bodies to
    respond in physiological ways

7
EMOTIONS
  • Examples of physiological responses
  • Anger increased heart rate and adrenaline serve
    to increase energy and power
  • Fear increased blood flow to the legs for
    flight the body may freeze for a moment giving
    time to gauge fight/flight response
  • Happiness brain activity inhibits negative
    thoughts and fosters increased energy

8
EMOTIONS
  • Surprise raising of eyebrows expands the field
    of vision, helps to see what is happening and
    plan action
  • Sadness a general drop in energy and enthusiasm
    creates an opportunity to mourn (Goleman, 1995)
  • Love bodily sensations promote well-being and a
    general state of calm and contentment

9
WORKING WITH EMOTIONS
  • Social workers work with clients emotions in a
    number of ways (helping clients to explore and
    understand their emotions/feelings, allowing
    clients to express emotions without censorship).
  • The overall goal is to support clients gain
    emotional literacy the ability to experience
    ones emotions with appropriate intensity and to
    understand what is causing these feelings
    (Parrott, 1997, p. 260)

10
WORKING WITH EMOTIONS
  • Goleman (1995) suggests that the ability to
    recognise feelings as they happen is the
    cornerstone of emotional intelligence and that
    people in touch with their feelings/emotions are
    better able to cope with life experiences and are
    more competent decision-makers

11
UNDERSTANDING EMOTIONS
  • Understanding emotions comes from appreciating
    the interactions of 3 components
  • Thoughts
  • Physiological changes
  • Behaviour

12
UNDERSTANDING EMOTIONS
  • Feelings are internal physiological reactions
    to your experiences. You may begin to tremble,
    sweat, or have a surge of energy. Your heart may
    beat faster. Tears may come. Although feelings
    are internal reactions, they do have outward
    signs. Sadness is inside you, but you cry or
    frown on the outside…feelings are always internal
    states, but you use overt behaviours to
    communicate your feelings to others (Johnson,
    1997)

13
CLASSIFYING AND UNDERSTANDING EMOTIONS
  • EXERCISE 5.1
  • In groups of 3 look at the emotion on the left
    hand column. Try to come up with as many words as
    you can for these emotions. Are they comfortable
    or uncomfortable emotions? Are they easy or
    difficult to show? Why?

14
CLASSIFYING AND UNDERSTANDING EMOTIONS
  • Word Modifiers change the level of emotion
    expressed (e.g., very, extremely, somewhat,
    mostly, little)
  • Metaphors are a way of describing something by
    using a symbol as a comparison

15
CLASSIFYING AND UNDERSTANDING EMOTIONS
  • Exercise 5.2
  • In groups of 3 look at the list of metaphors
    below and try to identify the possible feelings
    that each suggests
  • tied up in knots about to blow up
  • in a pressure cooker on a sinking ship
  • tearing my hair out in a sticky situation

16
NONVERBAL BEHAVIOUR
  • Most people are familiar with the physiological
    reactions that occur in a moment of great fear
    (adrenaline increase, elevated heart rate, rapid
    breathing, dry mouth). Many are clearly visible
    to any observer, even before any verbal
    declaration of fear
  • Consequently, we can often trust nonverbal
    communication as a more reliable indicator of
    feelings

17
NONVERBAL BEHAVIOUR
  • Research has shown that more than 55 of the
    meaning of a message is given nonverbally.
  • A persons emotions may be conveyed much more
    accurately by body posture/eyes than by words
  • Social workers who are able to respond to
    nonverbal as well as verbal messages project an
    unusual warmth, sensitivity, and perceptiveness
    that enhances the intimacy of the relationship

18
NONVERBAL BEHAVIOUR
  • Social workers need to interpret nonverbal
    communication cautiously. Typically it can have
    many meanings that vary according to a multitude
    of factors (culture, context)
  • Body language is easily interpreted on some
    occasions. At other times, it is ambiguous
    particularly when people communicate
    contradictory messages

19
NONVERBAL BEHAVIOUR
  • Voice
  • Social workers can learn a great deal from their
    clients from their voice tone, volume, and pitch.
    These variables can reveal if clients are
    depressed, euphoric, angry (e.g., anger tends to
    be expressed with speech that is more rapid and
    loud, sadness by more pauses and slowness)

20
NONVERBAL BEHAVIOUR
  • Spatial Distance
  • Halls Model (1959)
  • Intimate distance (2 feet)
  • Personal distance (2 4 feet)
  • Social distance (4 12 feet)
  • Public distance (12 feet)

21
NONVERBAL BEHAVIOUR
  • Exercise 5.3
  • In groups of two start out at a social distance
    from your colleague. Move your chair closer until
    your partner says stop. This indicates your
    comfort zone
  • Discuss how this will influence how mindful you
    are in relation to space in your work
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