Promoting Social Responsibility in Children and Early Adolescents: Research Findings from a Universi - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Promoting Social Responsibility in Children and Early Adolescents: Research Findings from a Universi PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: 1358d0-YTc4O



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Promoting Social Responsibility in Children and Early Adolescents: Research Findings from a Universi

Description:

1. The Relation of Social Responsibility to School Belonging and Prosocial ... Recently, Noble Peace Prize Laureate, Archbishop Desmond Tutu said: ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:159
Avg rating:3.0/5.0

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Promoting Social Responsibility in Children and Early Adolescents: Research Findings from a Universi


1
Promoting Social Responsibility in Children and
Early Adolescents  Research Findings from a
University - School Board Partnership
  • Association for Moral Education
  • Dana Point, California
  • November 12, 2004

2
Papers in Session
  • 1. The Relation of Social Responsibility to 
    School Belonging and Prosocial Behaviors Among
    Children and Early Adolescents
  • Kimberly A. Schonert-Reichl, Molly Lawlor,
    Jeannie Kerr
  •  
  • 2. Significant School - Based Adults Impact on
    Individual  and Social Responsibility
  • Denise Buote and Kimberly A. Schonert-Reichl
  •  
  • 3. Implementing Programs to Promote Students
    Social Responsibility  What Do Teachers and
    Administrators Have to Say?
  • Lisa Pedrini

3
Background
  • The promotion of social responsibility and
    social-emotional development in students has long
    been considered to be a goal of education.
  • In 1997, in British Columbia (BC), Canada, Social
    Responsibility was identified as one of four
    performance standards - a standard that should be
    promoted to the same degree of reading, writing,
    and numeracy.
  • In response to the increased focus on social
    responsibility in BC, a partnership was formed
    between the University of British Columbia's
    Faculty of Education and the Vancouver School
    Board.   

4
Overview of Session
  • The Case for Considering the Social Side of
    Learning
  • British Columbia Ministry of Education and Social
    Responsibility
  • Vancouver School Board (VSB) Focus on Social
    Responsibility
  • The VSB partnership with UBC
  • Research in three schools
  • Seaview Elementary School
  • Oceanview Elementary School
  • Cityview Elementary Community School

5
Making the Case for the Social Side of Learning
  • There is a growing concern about childrens
    social and emotional adjustment and mental
    health
  • 15 to 30 of school-age children are at risk
    for successful development and require support
    and assistance (OECD, 1995).
  • 1 in 5 children (20) identified with mental
    health problems (Offord et al., 1991 Romano et
    al., 2001).
  • 75 - 80 of children and youth do not receive
    the services they need (National Advisory Mental
    Health Council, 1990).

6
Making the Case for the Social Side of Learning
  • A comprehensive mission for schools is to
    educate students to be knowledgeable,
    responsible, socially skilled, healthy, caring,
    and contributing citizens. (Greenberg,
    Weissberg, Utne OBrien, Zins, Fredericks,
    Resnik, Elias, 2003)

7
Making the Case for the Social Side of Learning
  • The aim of education is growth or development,
    both intellectual and moral. (Dewey, 1964, p.
    213.)
  • Educators are influencing childrens social and
    emotional development in many ways already via
    the hidden curriculum (Jackson, 1968).
  • those unstated norms, values, and beliefs that
    are implicitly taught in schools (Giroux, 1983,
    p. 47).
  • Analytical intelligence (IQ) accounts for only
    10 to 15 of job success and other real-world
    outcomes (Goelman, 1995).

8
Balancing Educating the Mind with Educating the
Heart
  • Recently, Noble Peace Prize Laureate, Archbishop
    Desmond Tutu said
  • Educating the mind without educating the heart
    has produced brilliant scientists who used their
    intelligence for evil.

9
Why is it Important to Promote Social
Responsibility?
  • Socially responsible and prosocial behavior are
    important educational outcomes, critical to
    school adjustment, and should be promoted with
    the same frequency as the development of academic
    skills (Wentzel, 1991).
  • Social responsible behavior correlates positively
    with academic achievement
  • Helps create safe, orderly, and positive school
    environments that facilitate learning and
    interpersonal relationships.
  • Motivates students to becomes more engaged in the
    learning process.

10
Social Responsibility A Definition
  • The term socially responsible behaviour
    highlights the importance of internalizationtakin
    g over the values and attitudes of society as
    ones own so that socially acceptable behavior is
    motivated not by anticipation of external
    consequences but by intrinsic or internal
    factors
  • Grusec Goodnow
  • as cited in Bear, Telzrow and deOliveira, 1997

11
(No Transcript)
12
BC Social Responsibility Performance Standards
  • Distributed, in draft form, in 2000.
  • Intended to provide educators, students, and
    families with a common set of expectations, along
    with materials for evaluating individual
    students, groups of students, or school
    populations.

13
B.C. Social Responsibility Performance Standards
4 aspects 1. Contributing to the classroom and
school community 2. Solving problems in peaceful
ways 3. Valuing diversity and defending human
rights 4. Exercising democratic rights and
responsibilities
Not Yet Within Expectations Meets
Expectations (Minimally) Fully Meets
Expectations Exceeds Expectations
See http//www.bced.gov.bc.ca/perf_stands/social_r
esp.htm
14
Vancouver School Board (VSB) District Direction
in Social Responsibility
  • The goal recognizes that contributing in the
    classroom and school community in the areas of
    volunteering, leading, participating, and
    cooperating is as important as academic,
    intellectual, physical, artistic and aesthetic
    achievement. Social responsibility addresses the
    overarching goal of developing thoughtful,
    responsible and active citizens.
  • VSB Accountability Contract, 2002.

15
VSB Social Responsibility Initiative(Spring,
2001 present)
  • Key Aspects of the Plan
  • Goal By 2005/2006 every school in Vancouver
    will be actively developing as a social
    responsibility learning community
  • UBC/VSB partnership (w/ Schonert-Reichl Hymel)
  • Professional Development
  • Research effectiveness
  • Partnership Schools Developing Demonstration
    Sites
  • One secondary, four elementary schools
  • Work collaboratively with VSB Learning Services
    Staff UBC
  • Focus Schools
  • Focus Day Conferences
  • Other professional development

16
The VSB/UBC Partnership Identifying the
Essential Ingredients for Promoting Social
Responsibility in Children
  • A Developmental Approach
  • Creation of a Caring Context
  • A Strengths-Based Approach
  • Attention to Implementation and Evaluation

17
A Systemic Approach
  • Social responsibility is not seen as a program,
    but rather an embedded, integrated approach that
    ideally permeates an entire school community.

18
Theoretical Perspectives
  • Constructivism considering the childs
    perspective (Piaget)
  • Caring communities (Battistich et al., 1997 Ryan
    Powelson, 1991 Noddings, 1992)
  • Resiliency (Garmezy, 1985 Luthar, 2003 Werner
    Smith, 1992)
  • Attachment theory (Ainsworth, 1977 Bowlby, 1973
    Watson, 2003)
  • School-Based Promotion of Social Emotional
    Competence (Elias et a., 1997 Weissberg
    Greenberg, 1998)

19
A Focus on Creating Caring School Communities
  • The educational environment has a profound
    influence childrens social, emotional, and
    academic well-being.
  • Caring communities are places where members
  • care about and support each other
  • actively participate in and have influence on the
    groups activities and decisions
  • feel a sense of belonging and identification with
    the group
  • have common norms, goals, and values (Battistich
    et al., 1997 p. 137)

20
Why Care About Care?
  • Childrens engagement or disengagement in
    institutions, such as schools, depends largely on
    whether childrens fundamental needs for
    belonging, autonomy, and competence are being
    fulfilled (Deci Ryan, 1985 Ryan Powelson,
    1991).
  • These basic needs are met when children have the
    opportunity to participate actively in a
    cohesive, caring group that shares a common
    purpose that is, a community.

21
The Vancouver School Board (VSB) Context
  • over 55,000 students
  • 91 elementary schools and 13 annexes
  • 18 secondary schools (48 alternate programs)
  • 61 first languages other than English spoken at
    home
  • 6 of elementary students and 8 of secondary
    students are Special Education Learners
  • 94 of secondary schools and 76 of elementary
    schools identified social responsibility in their
    growth plans

22
UBC/VSB PartnershipResearch Examining the
Social Side of Learning
  • 1. Seaview Elementary
  • 2. Mountainview Elementary
  • 3. Cityview Elementary

23
School Locations and Vulnerability
24
Inner City Vancouver - Context
  • BC Stats Local Health Area reports that
    Vancouver is 1 crime region in Province. Ranks
    1of 78.
  • The Vancouver Police Department corroborates
    high crime statistics in these areas
    Prostitution ranks 1 or 2 Violent crime
    highest in City.
  • Information from sources such as the Community
    Asset Mapping Project (CAMP) identifies social
    issues in the wider community study conducted
    by Dr. Clyde Hertzman, UBC
  • The area in general is characterized by high
    crime and socially at risk children.

25
Demonstration School 1 Seaview Elementary
School
  • Community has the lowest SES in Canada
  • K-7 elementary school 196 students
  • Inner city funded
  • LD-BD District Class
  • 75 Students speaking English as an
    Additional Language
  • 13 Students of First Nations Ancestry

26
Seaview Benefits of Being a Demonstration School
  • 4,000 annually for 5 years from VSB
  • Access to VSB staff for consultation and
    collaboration
  • Staff Professional Development
  • Meetings with partnership schools
  • UBC staff to guide, implement, and analyze
    research

27
Seaview Initiatives Prior to the Partnership
  • Second Step, Care Kit
  • Focus on Bullying
  • Roots of Empathy
  • Catch Them Being Good
  • Counsellor pullout and classroom sessions
  • Academic competence

28
3 Dimensions of Change
  • Context A Caring School Community
  • Opportunities for Student Learning and Growth in
    Social Responsibility
  • Evaluation

29
1st Dimension of ChangeContext A Caring
School Community
  • Code of Conduct Principles of Care
  • Discipline Non-punitive, restorative
  • Buddy Classes
  • Class Meetings
  • Common Language
  • Student Committee

30
2nd Dimension of ChangeOpportunities for
Learning and Growth
  • Developmental Approach
  • - Informed by Developmental Theory
  • - Child-Centred
  • Strengths-Based Approach
  • - strategies, skills and dispositions

31
Opportunities for Learning and Growth
  • Supervised Play Area
  • Grade Grouped weekly lessons
  • Opportunities to practice SR
  • Collaborative Learning practices
  • Integration of SR themes in curriculum
  • SR Performance Standards

32
3rd Dimension of ChangeEvaluation
  • The Social Responsibility Performance Standards
  • Research Partnership with UBC

33
The S.R. Performance Standards
  • Grade groupings of K-3, 4-5, 6-8
  • Continuum of Expectations
  • 4 strands
  • Solving Problems in Peaceful Ways
  • Contributing to Classroom/School Community
  • Valuing Diversity Defending Human Rights
  • Exercising Democratic Rights/Responsibilities

34
Collaboration
35
Getting Together to Share
36
Connections Through Acting
37
Research Partnership with UBC
  • Seaview Central Question from School Staff
  • Does a sense of autonomy and belonging at school
    encourage internalization of socially responsible
    attitudes and beliefs promoted by the school?

38
Operationalizing the Schools Question into a
Research Question
  • What are the relations of classroom/school
    supportiveness and autonomy to dimensions of
    social-emotional competence (empathy,
    perspective-taking) and social responsibility?

39
Seaview StudyMethod
  • Participants
  • 125 students, 3rd to 7th grades
  • 37 girls
  • 65 from two-parent families
  • 26 first language English, 25 Chinese, 22
    Vietnamese, and 27 other
  • 13 First Nations Ancestry
  • 96 of children participated

40
Measures
  • Empathy Perspective-Taking (IRI Davis, 1983)
  • Caring Classroom School/Community (Developmental
    Studies Center, 2002)
  • Classroom Supportiveness
  • e.g., The students in my class really care about
    each other.
  • Classroom Autonomy
  • e.g.,In my class students have a say in deciding
    what goes on.
  • School Belonging
  • e.g.,Teachers and students treat each other with
    respect in this school.

41
Measures (contd)
  • Social Responsibility (Wentzel, 1998)
  • Prosocial Peers
  • e.g., How often do you try to be nice to kids
    when something bad has happened to them?
  • Prosocial Academics
  • e.g., How often do you try to share what youve
    learned with your classmates?
  • Social Responsibility Peers
  • e.g.,How often do you try to keep promises that
    youve made to other kids?
  • Social Responsibility Academics
  • e.g., How often do you try to do what your
    teacher asks you to?

42
Question What are the relations of
classroom/school supportiveness to dimensions of
social-emotional competence and social
responsibility?
43
Relations of Caring Environment to Social
Responsibility Dimensions Correlations
Regression Analyses
44
Essential Ingredients for Promoting Social
Responsibility in Children
  • A Developmental Approach
  • Creation of a Caring Context
  • A Strengths-Based Approach
  • Attention to Implementation and Evaluation

45
Demonstration School 2Mountainview
ElementaryResearch Questions
  • What is the relation of social responsibility
    dimensions to students social, emotional, and
    behavioral adjustment?
  • How does social responsibility vary by students
    grade level?
  • What is the relation between students social
    responsibility and a caring classroom
    environment?
  • What are the dimensions of the school environment
    that are important to students?

46
Mountainview StudyMethod
  • Participants
  • 80 students, 4th-7th grades
  • 55 girls
  • 80 two-parent families
  • 16 first language English, 50 Chinese, 15
    Vietnamese, and 19 other
  • 65 of children participated in the study

47
Measures
  • Social Responsibility (Wentzel, 1998)
  • Prosocial Peers,
  • Prosocial Academics,
  • Responsibility Peers,
  • Responsibility Academics
  • Behavioral Dimensions (Self-Reports)
  • Prosocial Behaviors (Bandura et al., 1996)
  • Antisocial Behaviors (Bandura et a., 1996)

48
Measures (contd)
  • Empathy Perspective-Taking (IRI Davis, 1983)
  • Caring Community (Battistich et al., 2002)
  • Classroom Autonomy
  • In my class students have a say in deciding what
    goes on.
  • Classroom Supportiveness
  • The students in my class really care about each
    other.

49
Question 1 What is the link between social
responsibility and students social, emotional,
and behavioral adjustment?
  • Findings revealed that all social responsibility
    dimensions were significantly associated with
  • Empathy ()
  • Perspective-taking ()
  • Prosocial behaviors ()
  • Antisocial Behaviors (-)

50
Question 2 How does social responsibility vary
by students grade level?
51
Question 3 What is the relation between social
responsibility dimensions and a caring
classroom environment?
52
Question 4 What are the dimensions of the
school environment that are important to
students?
  • What is your favorite thing about Mountainview?
  • Environment
  • Physical environment of the school itself.
  • its a safe place, not too crowded,
    the soccer field
  • Curriculum/extra-curricular activities
  • Including all curriculum, extra-curricular
    activities such as sports and field trips.
  • reading, art, the lunch program, field
    trips
  • Resources
  • Educational resources that aid childrens
    learning.
  • computers, books, it has a computer lab




53
What are your favorite?
  • Interpersonal Relationships Staff
  • Relations between students and staff.
  • the teachers are very kind, secretaries,
    principal, vice-principal is nice
  • Interpersonal Relationships Peers/students
  • Relations among students themselves (positive).
  •  teams, I get to see my friends at school
  •  
  • Relational Environment
  • The overall social-emotional environment of
    Mountainview.
  • people respect each other, nice people,
    fair rules,
  • Other
  • everything, posters.

54
What is your favorite thing?Response frequencies
  • Environment 14.12
  • Curriculum/extra curricular 37
  • Resources 2.82
  • Interpersonal Relationships Staff 16.67
  • Interpersonal Relationships Peers 15.54
  • Relational Environment 12.43
  • Other 1.41

55
If you could change one thing about
Mountainview, what would it be?
  • Environment
  • The physical environment of the school itself.
  • less litter/more garbage cans, a better
    playground
  • Curriculum/extra-curricular activities
  • Including all curriculum, extra-curricular
    activities such as sports and field trips.
  • more P.E., longer recess, more sports and
    music.
  • Resources
  • All beneficial resources that aid childrens
    learning (resources students would like access
    to).
  • more books, computers, bigger library,
    more equipment

56
If you could change?
  • Interpersonal Relationships Staff
  • Relations between students and staff (negative,
    or needs improvement).
  • nicer teachers, more supervisors, more
    helpers
  • Interpersonal Relationships Peers
  • Relations among students themselves (negative,
    or needs improvement)
  • more people helping others, more friends
  • Relational Environment
  • The overall social-emotional environment of
    school.
  • more school spirit , more fair rules
  • Bullying Prevalence of bullying at school.
  • less bullying, no more bullies

57
If you could change one thingResponse
frequencies
  • Environment 30.54
  • Curriculum/extra curriculum 25.75
  • Resources 13.77
  • Interpersonal Relationships Staff 3.60
  • Interpersonal Relationships Peers 1.80
  • Relational Environment 11.34
  • Bullying 7.19
  • Other 6.0
About PowerShow.com