Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 133688-ZjhkM



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In

Description:

Negotiation is a basic means of getting what you want from others. ... Standard strategies often leave people dissatisfied, worn out or alienated. Getting to Yes ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:4498
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 40
Provided by: juliepo
Learn more at: http://www.jpcommunication.ca
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In


1
Getting to YesNegotiating Agreement Without
Giving In
  • Julie Poroznuk
  • JP Communication
  • julie.poroznuk_at_jpcommunication.ca
  • www.jpcommunication.ca

2
Getting to YesNegotiating Agreement Without
Giving In
Roger Fisher
Bruce Patton
William Ury
3
Getting to Yes
  • Negotiation is a basic means of getting what you
    want from others.
  • Back and forth communication designed to reach
    agreement when you and the other side have some
    shared and some opposed interests.
  • Negotiation is not easy to do well.
  • Standard strategies often leave people
    dissatisfied, worn out or alienated.

4
Getting to Yes
  • Dilemma people see two ways to negotiate soft
    and hard.
  • Soft avoid conflict, make concessions often end
    up exploited and feeling bitter.
  • Hard sees any situation as a contest of wills.
    Exhausts people and resources and harms
    relationships.
  • Other strategies are between hard and soft, but
    each involves a trade off.

5
Getting to Yes
  • Third way to negotiate both hard and soft.
  • Principled Negotiation decide issues on their
    merits instead of haggling.
  • Look for mutual gains wherever possible.
  • Where interests conflict, insist that results be
    based on some fair and independent standards.

6
Getting to Yes
  • Any method of negotiation may be fairly judged by
    three criteria
  • does it produce a wise agreement?
  • is it efficient?
  • does it improve or at least not damage the
    relationship between the parties?

7
Getting to Yes
  • A wise agreement
  • meets legitimate interests of each side to the
    extent possible
  • resolves conflicting interests fairly
  • is durable
  • takes community interests into account

8
Getting to Yes
  • Most negotiation depends on taking and then
    giving up a sequence of positions.
  • Taking positions tells the other side what you
    want, serves as an anchor and will produce
    acceptable agreements.
  • But often fails to meet basic criteria of a wise
    agreement reached efficiently and amicably.

9
Getting to Yes
  • Arguing over positions produces unwise agreements
  • negotiators lock themselves into positions which
    they must defend against attacks
  • the more you defend, the harder it is to change a
    position
  • position now involves ego and saving face
  • less and less likely an agreement will wisely
    reconcile original interests

10
Getting to Yes
  • Arguing over positions is inefficient
  • This process takes a lot of time.
  • You must start with an extreme position and
    stubbornly hold to it.
  • Make only small concessions as necessary to keep
    negotiations going.
  • Require many decisions by each side about what to
    offer and reject.

11
Getting to Yes
  • Arguing over positions endangers an ongoing
    relationship
  • strains and sometimes shatters relationships
  • long time commercial enterprise partners may part
    company
  • neighbours may stop speaking to each other
  • especially tragic in divorce/child custody
    situations

12
Getting to Yes
  • Being nice is no answer
  • in soft negotiations, make offers and
    concessions, be friendly, yield as necessary to
    avoid conflict (e.g. WWII)
  • between friends and family, it tends to be
    efficient as it produces results quickly
  • but it does not ensure a wise agreement
  • for example, story about the combs and the watch
    by O. Henry

13
Principled Negotiation
  • 4 Basic Points
  • People separate the people from the problem
  • Interests focus on interests, not positions
  • Options generate a variety of possibilities
    before deciding what to do
  • Criteria insists that the results be based on
    some objective standard

14
Principled Negotiation
  • People separate the people from the problem
  • emotions cloud the objective merits of the
    problem
  • egos become identified with positions
  • participants should come to see themselves as
    working side by side

15
Principled Negotiation
  • Interests
  • focus on interests, not positions
  • object is to satisfy underlying interests
  • a position may obscure what you really want
  • compromising is not likely to address underlying
    interests
  • example two men quarrelling in a library about
    the window.
  • example talks on nuclear testing breakdown over
    number of inspections

16
Principled Negotiation
  • Options generate a variety of possibilities
    before deciding what to do
  • having a lot at stake and searching for the one
    right solution inhibits creativity
  • create an opportunity to think up a wide range of
    solutions that advance shared interests and
    creatively reconcile differing interests
  • example argument over an orange

17
Principled Negotiation
  • Criteria insists that the results be based on
    some objective standard
  • for example, market value, expert opinion,
    custom, precedence or law
  • both parties can defer to a fair solution without
    giving in to each other

18
Use Objective Criteria
  • Fair standards
  • There is often more than one objective criterion
    available.
  • Car example
  • original cost less depreciation
  • what the car would have sold for
  • blue book value
  • replacement cost
  • what a court might award as the value

19
The one-text procedure
  • A mediator asks about interests instead of
    positions. Asks why?
  • First, she tries to learn all she can about the
    needs and interests.
  • Explores the possibility that he might be able to
    make a recommendation.
  • Involves preparing drafts and asking for
    criticisms.

20
Getting to Yes
  • Problem Positional Bargaining Which Game Should
    You Play?
  • Solution Change the Game Negotiate the Merits

21
Getting to Yes
  • Soft Participants are friends
  • Hard Participants are adversaries.
  • Principled Participants are problem solvers.

22
Getting to Yes
  • The goal is agreement.
  • The goal is victory.
  • The goal is a wise outcome reached efficiently
    and amicably.

23
Getting to Yes
  • Make concessions to cultivate the relationship.
  • Demand concessions as a condition of the
    relationship.
  • Separate the people from the problem.

24
Getting to Yes
  • Be soft on the people and the problem.
  • Be hard on the people and the problem.
  • Be soft on the people, hard on the problem.

25
Getting to Yes
  • Trust others.
  • Distrust others.
  • Proceed independent of trust.

26
Getting to Yes
  • Change your position easily.
  • Dig in to your position.
  • Focus on interests, not positions.

27
Getting to Yes
  • Make offers.
  • Make threats.
  • Explore interests.

28
Getting to Yes
  • Disclose your bottom line.
  • Mislead as to your bottom line.
  • Avoid having a bottom line.

29
Getting to Yes
  • Accept one-sided losses to reach agreement.
  • Demand one-sided gains as the price of agreement.
  • Invent options for mutual gain.

30
Getting to Yes
  • Search for the single answer the one they will
    accept.
  • Search for the single answer the one you will
    accept.
  • Develop multiple options to choose from decide
    later.

31
Getting to Yes
  • Insist on agreement.
  • Insist on your position.
  • Insist on using objective criteria.

32
Getting to Yes
  • Try to avoid a contest of will.
  • Try to win a contest of will.
  • Try to reach a result based on standards
    independent of will.

33
Getting to Yes
  • Yield to pressure.
  • Apply pressure.
  • Reason and be open to reason yield to principle,
    not pressure.

34
Sources of Negotiation Power
  • There is power in
  • developing a good working relationship with the
    other party
  • understanding interests
  • inventing an elegant option. (e.g. stamp auction
    rule highest bidder gets the stamps at price of
    second highest bid)
  • using external standards of legitimacy
  • developing a good BATNA

35
Getting to Yes
  • Make the most of your potential power.

Let us never negotiate out of fear. But let us
never fear to negotiate. -John F. Kennedy
36
Getting to YesNegotiating Agreement Without
Giving In
Roger Fisher
William Ury
Bruce Patton
37
Beyond ReasonUsing Emotions as you Negotiate
Daniel Shapiro
Roger Fisher
38
Beyond ReasonUsing Emotions as you Negotiate
Written in the same remarkable vein as Getting to
Yes, this book is a masterpiece."           
Stephen R. Covey, author, The 7 Habits of Highly
Effective People   Powerful, practical advice.
It will put your emotions to good use.
            Desmond Tutu, Nobel Laureate A
brilliant guide.  Anyone who faces a difficult
conversation, let alone a formal negotiation, can
use this as a guidebook.             Daniel
Goleman, author of Emotional Intelligence 
39
Getting to YesNegotiating Agreement Without
Giving In
  • Thank you!
About PowerShow.com